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Old 11-09-2019, 01:59 PM   #1
zaivala
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Systemd-analyze blame results


Bodhi continues to be one of the slower boots on my system. I ran systemd-analyze blame on it, and it shows quite a few things taking some time to load. My question is, what the heck do I do about it?

I admit to being a bit dense at times, and might as well be considered a n00b despite decades of Linux use since I don't know diddly about using Terminal (well, I learned a lot more diddly in the past year, but still kinda dumb).

System is a System76 Galago Pro 2, 16 Gb RAM, 256 Gb M.2 SSD, 1.0 Tb spinning metal, i5 processor and Intel graphics. Ask for more info and ye shall receive.

Text file is attached.
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File Type: txt systemd-analyze_blame.txt (3.0 KB, 18 views)
 
Old 11-09-2019, 08:59 PM   #2
syg00
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zaivala View Post
Bodhi continues to be one of the slower boots on my system.
Meaningless.
12 seconds versus 10, or 90 versus 10 ?. If the latter probably waiting on devices - in a shared setup often swap has been reformatted and the UUID has changed. At the boot menu, highlight the bodhi entry and hit e to edit the entry. Go down to the linux (probably) entry and remove quiet splash - don't hit enter, use <ctrl>-<x> as it says to boot.
You will, for this boot only, see all the boot messages - let us know if anything relevant shows up.
 
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Old 11-10-2019, 12:30 AM   #3
zaivala
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I tried that, but did not have quiet splash on that menu to remove. I have a picture I could post, but don't see attachments on this forum.

And more like 35 seconds.

Last edited by zaivala; 11-10-2019 at 12:33 AM.
 
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Old 11-10-2019, 01:18 AM   #4
syg00
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I meant to mention I haven't used bodhi in a while - I was presuming the setup was common to other distros. You need to see those early messages - often there is a count-down that systemd chooses not to tell you about in systemd-analyze.
 
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Old 11-11-2019, 11:48 AM   #5
cordx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zaivala View Post
System is a System76 Galago Pro 2, 16 Gb RAM, 256 Gb M.2 SSD, 1.0 Tb spinning metal, i5 processor and Intel graphics.
my thinkpad T430s with an i5-3320, 8 gigs of ram and an ssd boots bodhi 5.1 in just over 40 seconds. i have ubuntu mate 18.04 and linux mint 18.3 on the same machine and don't notice that either of them is particularly faster or slower. i haven't run systemd-analyze on them in a while so i don't have exact times.

Quote:
$ systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 14.844s (firmware) + 3.924s (loader) + 10.795s (kernel) + 10.814s (userspace) = 40.378s
 
Old 12-06-2019, 11:22 AM   #6
kozaki
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bodhi 5 boots in 44 sec on my 10 yrs old Atom netbook:
Code:
$ sudo systemd-analyze blame && sudo systemd-analyze
          3.537s dev-sda5.device
          1.621s udisks2.service
          1.171s networkd-dispatcher.service
           874ms accounts-daemon.service
           859ms lightdm.service
           776ms keyboard-setup.service
           754ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
           733ms grub-common.service
           730ms apport.service
           700ms NetworkManager.service
           594ms avahi-daemon.service
           536ms systemd-journald.service
           521ms ubiquity.service
           469ms systemd-journal-flush.service
           435ms ssh.service
           406ms alsa-restore.service
           390ms dev-mqueue.mount
           358ms blk-availability.service
           355ms systemd-modules-load.service
           345ms kmod-static-nodes.service
           343ms dev-hugepages.mount
           343ms ufw.service
           332ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
           331ms wpa_supplicant.service
           323ms systemd-resolved.service
           311ms systemd-logind.service
           289ms rsyslog.service
           283ms systemd-udevd.service
           257ms systemd-timesyncd.service
           255ms systemd-remount-fs.service
           254ms user@1001.service
           241ms data-swapfile1.swap
           124ms systemd-fsck@dev-disk-by\x2duuid-xxxx.service
           119ms systemd-backlight@leds:dell::kbd_backlight.service
           116ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
           111ms systemd-backlight@backlight:acpi_video0.service
           104ms systemd-sysctl.service
           100ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
            99ms systemd-rfkill.service
            96ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
            82ms systemd-random-seed.service
            76ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
            73ms polkit.service
            72ms plymouth-quit-wait.service
            72ms systemd-fsck@dev-disk-by\xxxx.service
            69ms setvtrgb.service
            57ms systemd-user-sessions.service
            55ms console-setup.service
            42ms systemd-update-utmp.service
            35ms plymouth-read-write.service
            34ms home.mount
            33ms data.mount
            32ms ureadahead-stop.service
            31ms udisks.service
            13ms snapd.socket
Startup finished in 37.424s (kernel) + 7.106s (userspace) = 44.531s
From a good 90 sec before I removed what I don't use.
You might want to clean it up a bit, eg:
- do you use snap, lvm, graphical update (desktop bar icon), have a discrete gpu?

Note that when service has a timer unit with the same name, the later starts the former. eg 'apt-daily-upgrade.timer' starts 'apt-daily-upgrade.service' and therefore is the one to be disabled if and only when not used/needed:
Code:
$ sudo systemctl disable apt-daily-upgrade.timer
Note: I've always have had 'quiet splash' on the Bodhi and any Ubuntu based OS I installed in the past ten years at least. Editing them out helps "see" the boot process, especially the slower parts.

Last edited by kozaki; 12-06-2019 at 11:26 AM. Reason: Adding 'quiet splash' note.
 
Old 12-07-2019, 08:13 AM   #7
zaivala
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I will point out that systemd-analyze gives you different results as to whether you have automatic boot or need to login to boot. If you have it set to log in with your password, it is only timed from the login.
 
Old 12-07-2019, 02:22 PM   #8
kozaki
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zaivata where do you take that systemd-analyze is impacted by having user autologin on or off? It can be used to (taken from man) determine system boot-up performance statistics, retrieve other state and tracing information from the system and service manager, and to verify the correctness of unit files. If you ask I could set my user to login then launch systemd-analyze; the results won't change.

PS I just checked how long it takes for Mageia linux 7 to boot on the same Atom CPU machine after cleaning up the services:

Code:
Startup finished in 5.439s (kernel) + 23.983s (userspace) = 29.422s
 
Old 12-08-2019, 10:05 AM   #9
zaivala
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kozaki, from experience. systemd starts at autologin, or at manual login. Autologin is much sooner in the process, manual login is started after the graphical pocess is nearly complete. I ran a bunch of tests on that on a multiboot system, in various boots, and reported on those times, several months ago on mintCast.

Last edited by zaivala; 12-08-2019 at 10:08 AM.
 
Old 12-08-2019, 10:21 AM   #10
kozaki
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For whatever reason you made an inaccurate conclusion after your tests. Here's systemd-analyze [blame] on the same netbook without autologin:
Code:
~$ systemd-analyze 
Startup finished in 38.648s (kernel) + 13.406s (userspace) = 52.055s
graphical.target reached after 13.366s in userspace

~$ systemd-analyze blame
          7.301s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
          3.602s dev-sda5.device
          2.691s keyboard-setup.service
          2.072s udisks2.service
          1.872s networkd-dispatcher.service
          1.497s lightdm.service
          1.485s plymouth-quit-wait.service
          1.066s systemd-udev-trigger.service
           949ms systemd-journald.service
           883ms NetworkManager.service
           796ms systemd-journal-flush.service
           693ms grub-common.service
           656ms plymouth-start.service
           584ms accounts-daemon.service
           571ms apport.service
           533ms ssh.service
           ...
 
Old Yesterday, 02:10 AM   #11
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zaivala View Post
systemd starts at autologin, or at manual login.
This is totally, completely, and utterly wrong.
I suspect when you say "login" you mean something else. Even so I don't see how "it" (whatever that is) can impact systemd-analyze output. But if it does, that might be an indicator for you where you need to look to find the cause of the delay.

Last edited by ondoho; Yesterday at 02:11 AM.
 
Old Yesterday, 07:05 AM   #12
zaivala
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OK, you want to argue about what empirical evidence says, go right ahead. But I started this to get some HELP, like how to turn things off or disable thing which might be slowing my boot down that may not be essential. If you don't want to do that, I don't need the pissing contest.
 
  


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