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Old 08-20-2018, 04:28 PM   #1
Lars Forss
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root login


How do I log in as root? Password?

necessary if you want to save system files from nano editor.
 
Old 08-20-2018, 06:50 PM   #2
yancek
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Bodhi is based on Ubuntu and does not have a default root user created but rather uses sudo which is explained on the Ubuntu page below.

http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/...do_root.8.html
 
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Old 08-21-2018, 03:18 PM   #3
enigma9o7
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type "sudo su" from terminal
 
Old 08-21-2018, 03:42 PM   #4
tristam
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Or sudo -s
 
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Old 08-21-2018, 03:50 PM   #5
Keith Hedger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars Forss View Post
How do I log in as root? Password?

necessary if you want to save system files from nano editor.
You Don't need to login as root just to edit system files just use 'sudo', if you don't know how to use sudo you probably shouldn't be mucking with system files anyway.
 
Old 08-21-2018, 03:56 PM   #6
tristam
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That is definitely true. I'm a sysadmin, so half my terminals are in some state of rootishness.
 
Old 08-22-2018, 01:59 PM   #7
Lars Forss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Hedger View Post
You Don't need to login as root just to edit system files just use 'sudo', if you don't know how to use sudo you probably shouldn't be mucking with system files anyway.
One of the reasons I like running Linux systems is the ability to "muck" around. I understand that it is safer to have root locked but have been using it on previous Linux installations.
 
Old 08-22-2018, 02:28 PM   #8
tristam
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On a personal system, knock yourself out. Just keep in mind the fearsome, awesome, destructive capabilities of root. I once deleted the entire openldap directory with a couple of stray keystrokes.
 
Old 08-24-2018, 02:11 AM   #9
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars Forss View Post
One of the reasons I like running Linux systems is the ability to "muck" around.
fair enough!
it's your machine.
but as far as these and most other forums are concerned, the following rule applies: do what you want - but don't expect us to help when things break due to your adventurousness.

PS:
most "mucking" is perfectly possible without root privileges.
 
Old 08-24-2018, 02:31 AM   #10
pan64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enigma9o7 View Post
type "sudo su" from terminal
using sudo and su together is deprecated.
 
Old 08-24-2018, 03:51 PM   #11
enigma9o7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
but don't expect us to help when things break due to your adventurousness.
So far people have been fairly helpful... I wouldn't necessarily say that applies to everyone.
 
Old 08-27-2018, 06:38 PM   #12
RonCam
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by tristam View Post
... I'm a sysadmin, so half my terminals are in some state of rootishness.
That has to be a 'classic', one of a kind expression. Congratulations. A DDG search of the internet seems to show it's never before been used. I shall have to figure out ways of dropping that expression into my casual conversations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by enigma9o7 View Post
So far people have been fairly helpful... I wouldn't necessarily say that applies to everyone.
I'm reading this and was finding it hard to realize no one was making the one suggestion that would completely eliminate the problem.

I have a new Bodhi 5.0 installation and as soon as I could, I installed TimeShift. It's not in the repo ... you have to install a PPA. Put TimeShift PPA into DDG, and it's on the first line, at the top of the search results.

I was a great fan of Systemback, but after comparing the two, I'm very comfortable with what I see in its replacement. IMO, it would be difficult-impossible to 'muck-up' anything this utility couldn't put right. Like Systemback, even if you crash or disable the desktop environment, you can run it, if you can get a terminal prompt. And, if you manage to completely kill the OS, you can run it from a LiveCD/DVD for an OS that includes it.

If one's 'adventures' include accidentally reformatting the drive, just keep a copy of its backup files elsewhere ... note, TimeShift is intended for system files, but not for data backup!

I haven't tried to kill my OS to test it, but I can say it's (visibly, at least) running fine in Bodhi 5.0, under Moksha.

Last edited by RonCam; 08-27-2018 at 06:40 PM.
 
Old 08-28-2018, 12:07 PM   #13
tristam
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Quote:
I have a new Bodhi 5.0 installation and as soon as I could, I installed TimeShift. It's not in the repo ... you have to install a PPA. Put TimeShift PPA into DDG, and it's on the first line, at the top of the search results.

I was a great fan of Systemback, but after comparing the two, I'm very comfortable with what I see in its replacement. IMO, it would be difficult-impossible to 'muck-up' anything this utility couldn't put right. Like Systemback, even if you crash or disable the desktop environment, you can run it, if you can get a terminal prompt. And, if you manage to completely kill the OS, you can run it from a LiveCD/DVD for an OS that includes it.

If one's 'adventures' include accidentally reformatting the drive, just keep a copy of its backup files elsewhere ... note, TimeShift is intended for system files, but not for data backup!

I haven't tried to kill my OS to test it, but I can say it's (visibly, at least) running fine in Bodhi 5.0, under Moksha.
Kind of a Windows Restore Point for Linux on steroids. I usually walk the tightrope without a safety net when it comes to desktop OS. It's a matter of 10-15 minutes to reinstall and I usually end up configuring it better/cleaner the next iteration.
 
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Old 09-01-2018, 07:11 AM   #14
RonCam
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Angry

Quote:
Originally Posted by tristam View Post
Kind of a Windows Restore Point for Linux on steroids. ...
Well, this works like Windows Restore Point should work. I recall (in Windows 7?) more than one restore point failing completely. The Windows utility can run out of space without notifying the user, then the files become corrupt and since it's an incremental backup in an undecipherable format, now the 'whole thing' is 'toast'.

This utility operates more transparently, you can see what it's doing, and so, the above scenario is, IMO, quite unlikely.
 
  


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