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2018 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2018 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite projects/products of 2018. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 12th.


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View Poll Results: Open Source File Sync Application of the Year
Cozy 0 0%
FreeFileSync 12 14.81%
Nextcloud 21 25.93%
ownCloud 20 24.69%
Pydio 0 0%
Seafile 6 7.41%
SparkleShare 0 0%
Stacksync 0 0%
Syncany 1 1.23%
Syncthing 21 25.93%
Voters: 81. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-05-2019, 01:00 PM   #1
jeremy
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Open Source File Sync Application of the Year


A new category last year.

--jeremy
 
Old 01-06-2019, 02:40 PM   #2
wpeckham
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It is difficult to beat RSYNC for file/folder sync. Since sync is exactly what rsync is DESIGNED for I am confused by its exclusion from this list and inclusion on the backup list when it is not really designed (although often used) for backups.
 
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Old 01-07-2019, 12:51 AM   #3
YesItsMe
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Seafile is probably the best "Dropbox alternative" on the market. Granted, it does not support all the extra features of nextCloud etc., but it does a very fine job synchronizing files.
 
Old 01-09-2019, 10:28 AM   #4
Medievalist
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpeckham View Post
It is difficult to beat RSYNC for file/folder sync. Since sync is exactly what rsync is DESIGNED for I am confused by its exclusion from this list and inclusion on the backup list when it is not really designed (although often used) for backups.
Yes, these seem to be remote storage apps with some synchronization capability, and not file/folder sync utilities at all. I too am confused!
 
Old 01-10-2019, 11:30 PM   #5
NachoLord
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+1 for rsync.
 
Old 01-11-2019, 04:26 AM   #6
linustalman
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Question

Why no Luckybackup or Grsync?
 
Old 01-11-2019, 05:02 AM   #7
chrisretusn
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Hmm. Well I don't see it, but I use rsync mostly via scripts (mirroring task for the most part). I also use Grsync as a front end to rsync to backup to USB from a laptop used at an organization I belong too; which in turn gets synced as a backup to my backup server at home (off site storage). Rsync is also use for backups using Rsnapshot.
 
Old 01-11-2019, 08:48 AM   #8
hydrurga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpeckham View Post
It is difficult to beat RSYNC for file/folder sync. Since sync is exactly what rsync is DESIGNED for I am confused by its exclusion from this list and inclusion on the backup list when it is not really designed (although often used) for backups.
I suppose that there is quite a bit of cross-over between backup and sync applications because many pieces of software possess both functionalities. It's a bit like categorising library books - which category to put multi-category applications in?

Anyway, as I prefer using the GUI when I can, FreeFileSync for me. If only it would incorporate FTP and syncing to zip files then I could use it for *all* my syncing needs and get rid of one of the last pieces of Windows software that I own, namely SyncBackPro.
 
Old 01-11-2019, 09:26 AM   #9
Medievalist
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Rsync is a transport and sync utility not a backup application

Look at it this way... backup systems like dirvish, time machine, shootsnap (my favorite) and rsnapshot use rsync riding on ssh or rsh riding on TCP riding on IP riding on a mix of transport layers and hardware. The rsync layer is near the top of the stack, but it's not the top, there's a script or cron job (in the case of shootsnap or rsnapshot) or the rsync libraries are called by a program (as in the case of Dirvish) or the rsync algorithm is implemented separately (as in Time Machine). There is at least one layer between the end user and rsync, although sometimes that layer is simply cron or busybox.

If we're going to randomly choose a middle layer when we describe or categorize a process by assigning it a name, we will lose the ability to communicate precisely. Either describe the whole stack, or the visible top surface. Rsync is only the visible top surface when copying files with the rsync algorithm; calling it a backup utility is fundamentally imprecise. Rsync can be used for backup, just as a tractor can be used to drive a sawmill, but it is not a backup application.

Mad props to Mike Rubel.

Last edited by Medievalist; 01-11-2019 at 09:27 AM. Reason: fix title
 
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:22 AM   #10
onlyonemac
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I use NextCloud for calendars and stuff but I voted for Syncthing because I tried it out once and I like the distributed nature and the fact that it can work over the internet without needing a domain/dynamic DNS. I hope to see their Android app fixed/updated and I've actually considered using it myself on numerous occasions.
 
Old 01-12-2019, 09:38 AM   #11
chrisretusn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Medievalist View Post
Look at it this way... backup systems like dirvish, time machine, shootsnap (my favorite) and rsnapshot use rsync riding on ssh or rsh riding on TCP riding on IP riding on a mix of transport layers and hardware. The rsync layer is near the top of the stack, but it's not the top, there's a script or cron job (in the case of shootsnap or rsnapshot) or the rsync libraries are called by a program (as in the case of Dirvish) or the rsync algorithm is implemented separately (as in Time Machine). There is at least one layer between the end user and rsync, although sometimes that layer is simply cron or busybox.

If we're going to randomly choose a middle layer when we describe or categorize a process by assigning it a name, we will lose the ability to communicate precisely. Either describe the whole stack, or the visible top surface. Rsync is only the visible top surface when copying files with the rsync algorithm; calling it a backup utility is fundamentally imprecise. Rsync can be used for backup, just as a tractor can be used to drive a sawmill, but it is not a backup application.

Mad props to Mike Rubel.
Well I agree to some extent however, this poll category is about Open Source File Sync Application of the Year.

Of the programs listed in the poll, I have only used FreeFileSync. I used it to perform the exact same task that I now use Grsync for. Which is to ensure important files from the computer of a non-profit I am a member of are backed up (saved). A second hard disk was installed for backups. We used Cobian Backup for that (run on shutdown). This computer was an "old" Pentium computer with Windows XP installed. FreeFileSync was used to sync those important files to an USB stick for transfer to my home computer which runs Slackware. When the computer finally gave up the ghost a member donated a new laptop. This laptop came preinstalled with Windows 10. I imaged that, wiped it and install Slackware (I am the primary user) on it. Since Grync does what I need, I went with that.

Rsnapshot does a great job on doing backups. As far as I am concerned it is a valid backup application. I voted for it in the Backup Applications of the Year. Rsnapshot has saved the day several times. Especially when it comes to single file restores or checking old logs. I have even done a few full restores from snapshots created by Rsnapshot, included to new and different computers. Rsync is just one of the tools that Rsnapshot uses. Rsync could not do that by it self, so in that respect I do agree that rsync it self is not a backup application.

Since I have used FreeFileSync in the past, It gets my vote. It an excellent program that does a great job with synchronization task.

Quote:
shootsnap (my favorite)
??? Can't find that one.

Last edited by chrisretusn; 01-12-2019 at 09:43 AM.
 
Old 01-15-2019, 02:27 AM   #12
trosdejos
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I started with OwnCloud few months ago with good results. Very simple setup.
 
Old 01-15-2019, 12:53 PM   #13
DaneM
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Can we add rclone?
 
Old 01-15-2019, 01:04 PM   #14
Cyberjackal
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Rsync... but since it's not there, I say Seafile. Great Dropbox alternative!
 
Old 01-28-2019, 10:05 AM   #15
oldrocker99
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Grsync is my go-to backup program.
 
  


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