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2003 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2003 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2003. This is your chance to be heard!

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View Poll Results: Distribution of the Year
Red Hat 178 10.46%
Slackware 448 26.34%
Debian 173 10.17%
Mandrake 276 16.23%
Fedora 95 5.58%
Libranet 27 1.59%
Suse 160 9.41%
Arch 37 2.18%
VectorLinux 8 0.47%
Knoppix 69 4.06%
Gentoo 198 11.64%
LFS 32 1.88%
Voters: 1701. You may not vote on this poll

 
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Old 11-29-2003, 11:16 PM   #121
wayneinmpls
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 23

Rep: Reputation: 15
Favorite Distributions


Being new to Linux, I am wondering if someone could tell me why Slackware got over 100 more votes than any other distribution? An answer a little more detailed than, 'its better' would be good
. What makes it so special? Maybe I shoud switch.
 
Old 11-29-2003, 11:21 PM   #122
Atmchicago
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Registered: Apr 2003
Location: Baltimore
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 219

Rep: Reputation: 32
I voted for and use Slack. I was surprised at its popularity myself, but I find it to be:
-Bloat-free
-Easy to configure
-Fully compatible with either KDE or GNOME or window managers
-Secure
-Fast
-Stable

It also has a nice package system. Like the rest of its configuration tools, it is not very graphically fancy - you run them in the command line. Yet the package system works great, and a program called swaret lets you upgrade online. There are other systems I haven't used but apparently work very well too.

It also is only on two CDs, and one of them is a rescue disk too.

I could be missing things, but that's why slack is great!
 
Old 11-30-2003, 12:15 AM   #123
Scruff
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Registered: Oct 2002
Location: Stoughton, MA
Distribution: Gentoo x86_64 & PPC
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Slack is also not near as buggy as the runner up

Last edited by Scruff; 11-30-2003 at 12:54 AM.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 12:48 AM   #124
slakmagik
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 4,113

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Re: Favorite Distributions

Quote:
Originally posted by wayneinmpls
Being new to Linux, I am wondering if someone could tell me why Slackware got over 100 more votes than any other distribution? An answer a little more detailed than, 'its better' would be good
. What makes it so special? Maybe I shoud switch.
Check out the Slackware subforum - lots of threads asking and answering just that question.

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=121100
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=118504
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=119883
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=117868
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=116051
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=116797
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=110137

and so on.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 09:06 AM   #125
Franklin
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2002
Distribution: Slackware, Windows 7
Posts: 1,253

Rep: Reputation: 55
A pointless argument, but ....

SuSE 8.2 (9 is a waste without 2.6 stable)

Very well done and can be debloatified with practice. YaST is really getting quite good.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 11:02 AM   #126
wayneinmpls
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 23

Rep: Reputation: 15
OK. Thanks for all of the input folks! Now I see why Slack is so popular.
And I can see that I probably need two distros for different uses right now. One workstation type for database development where I don't have to worry about the hardware, and one like Slack where even an old EE hardware guy can learn some new software.
Now I just have to figure out which will be the best for the db development!
 
Old 11-30-2003, 11:30 AM   #127
Scruff
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Location: Stoughton, MA
Distribution: Gentoo x86_64 & PPC
Posts: 949

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Quote:
Originally posted by wayneinmpls
OK. Thanks for all of the input folks! Now I see why Slack is so popular.
And I can see that I probably need two distros for different uses right now. One workstation type for database development where I don't have to worry about the hardware, and one like Slack where even an old EE hardware guy can learn some new software.
Now I just have to figure out which will be the best for the db development!
My suggestion: Pick one and go with it. Any distro can be the best at anything with a little tweaking. Slack simply can be the best a little easier than some of the others and can be a perfect distro for whatever your needs are; on any hardware.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 11:37 AM   #128
wayneinmpls
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 23

Rep: Reputation: 15
I'm a try it before you buy it type.....
And since I have lots of disk space on my test box maybe I'll burn the Slack isos and do a dual boot to see what it is like. I love to experiment anyway...
Now I just have to figure out how to repartition one of my disks to make another mount point for the new distr.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 01:27 PM   #129
cbarnes913
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: Upstate New York
Distribution: Working on LFS
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quick question: Why do so many of your favorite distros depend on the way it manages packages? I don't claim to be a linux expert or even a novice, but isn't one of the things linux boasts to be cross platform compatable, and isn't that the advantage of COMPILING software for your own unique machine, and isn't that worth the effort of learning to do it? Linux is a great and powerful operating system, but I don't think I can back up the use of precompiled packages. That is just one of the most non-linux things I can think of. I can understand being frustrated with dependencies, but then wouldn't it make more sense to go to Linux From Scratch? Then you have this wonderful familiarity with your system. You know what's installed on it, you know what isn't installed on it, and therefore, you know what you do need and what you don't need when you want to add new programs just by reading up on the dependencies on the developers site.

Sorry, that turned into a rant. Can somebody back me up, or am I in left field?
 
Old 11-30-2003, 03:52 PM   #130
Atmchicago
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Registered: Apr 2003
Location: Baltimore
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 219

Rep: Reputation: 32
Packages are nice because they are indexed and show what you have installed. They also make it easier to install things - I'm still a novice myself, but when I tried compiling Evolution it gave me a bunch of library errors. I prefer not to deal with that, and the Evolution slack package works great.

Compiling also takes more time - can be 10 minutes, while a package can be less than one.

That said, I did compile wine because the packages didn't work as well.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 04:25 PM   #131
cbarnes913
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: Upstate New York
Distribution: Working on LFS
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
It must be my control freak, minimalist "I don't want it unless I need it", sort of personality. I can see why they are quick and easy, but I like efficiency. Again, just my personality.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 04:29 PM   #132
slakmagik
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 4,113

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Well, I'll back you up, cbarnes913 - I like a package management system of sorts, but one that kicks in after I've made the stuff, like checkinstall. 'Slack now, LFS later' - yup.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 08:08 PM   #133
codec
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: mad.es.eu
Distribution: ubuntu 5.04 knoppix Slack91/10 freebsd51 vector4 redhat9
Posts: 304

Rep: Reputation: 30
I am pretty new in the linux world, my votes go for vector linux 4. It's slack9 based, the packages that it selected are ultra fast and effective.

Redhat 9 is also good for me, it has acceptable i18n and lots of 3rd party support.

My favourite OS is still freeBSD.
 
Old 11-30-2003, 10:32 PM   #134
rshadow
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2002
Distribution: Gentoo!,RHL 7.3, RHL 9.1, FreeBSD 4.5, Mandrake 9.1
Posts: 23

Rep: Reputation: 15
Gentoo all the way, their implementation of portage is bar none as far as updating and installing. So tired of fighting with RPM's from RHL and MDK.. finnaly a distro that builds around *my* needs, and is true to the OpenSource Community as well!
 
Old 12-01-2003, 01:42 AM   #135
GreenerLinux
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Olympia, WA
Distribution: Xandros, Libranet, Mandrake
Posts: 86

Rep: Reputation: 15
It seems like this is more of a popularity contest than a real vote on which distro is the best. There are more Redhat, Slackware, Gentoo, and Mandrake users out there than there are Libranet, Knoppix, and "all the other little-known distro" users. It also depends on what a person uses Linux for. There aren't going to be a whole lot of newbies using Slackware or Gentoo and there aren't going to be a lot of veteran users who take a liking to a distribution like Lycoris.
 
  


 


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