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Old 06-13-2002, 03:40 PM   #16
sewer_monkey
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Quote:
Originally posted by sancho5

The problem with my point of view is that they rely on my preference, and influenced by the fact that they are the distros/builds that I know and use daily.
Well, I don't know... I am a Linux user right now, I prefer the Linux kernel over the BSD kernel, the major reason being the absence of dynamic loadable module support in the BSD kernel... But that's not the point. The point I want to push across is that choosing an OS should not be chiefly a matter of preference. One has to thoroughly research the capabilities and features of the contender OSs and choose the best option. Unfortunately, this is a luxury not all can afford...

Here's a crude and oversimplified example: if you're running a server with a lot of hot-pluggable devices, then you're probably better off with Linux, because it supports kernel modules. If you don't change the hardware configuration on the fly, then maybe *BSD is a better choice for you... Choosing Linux over *BSD due to your personal "preference" is unwise (to say the least) in my opinion.

The problem nowadays is that when a sysadmin is trained on a specific flavour of *NIX, he/she is already accustomed to it, and when time is of essence (which in most cases is certainly true), choosing an alternate flavour of the OS which may be better suited for the job at hand, but will require the sysadmin to go through a time-consuming learning curve may not be a viable option. In this case "preference" is the way to go, but at the same time it has to be noted that probably you're sacrificing some features at the same time (e.g. the possibility for better performance, security, e.t.c.).

Furthermore, one has to think about the cost of implementing a new (supposedly better-suited) OS, and compare it to the gains associated with it. Do the gains justify themselves? For example, does switching to OpenBSD because of its tight security justify the fact that your sysadmin has to go through a learning curve and be inefficient for a month? Maybe this inefficiency and lack of knowledge on his/her part will actually make your server less secure (we all know that any server is as secure as the sysadmin that maintains it) for a while... Can you afford that?

As you can see, it all depends... on a number of factors. In my opinion, "preference" should definitely not be one of these factors.
 
Old 06-14-2002, 08:12 AM   #17
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FreeBSD has kernel modules which can be loaded while the kernel is running.
 
Old 06-19-2002, 04:37 PM   #18
Pingo
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According to Dialtone, Linux 2.4.18 kernel is better for databases than FreeBSD (maybe OBSD as well?). Don't know whether formal tests have been done. FutureQuest sysadmins say that some server-related software packages are unavailble for *BSDs. Linux currently has better SMP support than FreeBSD, but this is only an issue where a server has 2 or more processors. However, the upcoming FreeBSD 5.x is supposed to have much better support for SMP (possibly better than Linux).
 
Old 06-19-2002, 04:51 PM   #19
orgcandman
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interesting...

hrrm...well, I've used FreeBSD, and linux, and what I've found is this. FreeBSD has much better support for the hardware that it does support. It may not have the SMP support that Linux has at the moment, but I think 5.x is supposedly going to fix that. FreeBSD also has some really nice security features built into the kernel (limiting shared memory and causing all processes to automatically fork as well as limiting the amount of concurrent processes something can have). Linux, however, supports many more devices and has one thing that is keeping me with it... a naitive JVM. FreeBSD also has support for ELF binaries, but I don't think that running a linux program on a BSD machine will give you quite the same response. I ran FreeBSD 4.5-Release, RedHat 6.2, and Debian potato on my ALPHA, and I found that FreeBSD ran on it much better than linux. However, I also tried running FreeBSD 4.4-stable, RedHat 5.2-7.1, and mandrake 7.1 on an SMP machine and found that redhat 7.1 walked away with the victory (after upgrading the kernel, of course ;-). What I like about linux is that I can totally customize it....whereas with a BSD it makes sense to just install the system as they have it (No BSD from scratch is there?)
Well, there is my story...
 
Old 06-26-2002, 12:35 AM   #20
wartstew
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I think philosophy is the biggest difference between Linux and *BSD.

One example: Consider the difference between their open source licenses?

Another example is that *BSD is "designed" by a smaller group of people who have specific goals and direction that the OS should take. They are not much interested in other people ideas if it conflicts with these goals.

Where as Linux is specifically NOT "designed"; it is "evolved". There is no specific direction to it, so it is going off in several directions at once. There is work being done to make it run well in large super-computer-clusters, as well as in small embedded devices. Work done to work well as a server, as well as a desktop OS. Although this anarchy has done amazingly well for Linux, *BSD is not stretched to these extremes.

Yet another example, which is really an extension of the above one: There few *BSD's, there are many Linux distributions. Some of the earlier comparisons have been made between *BSD and RedHat Linux. Although Redhat is very popular, *BSD would compare a lot closer to Debian GNU/Linux or Slackware. Lindows and Lycoris are trying to compare themselves to MS Windows. FreeBSD, OBSD, and NETBSD give you just one distribution for each of these three flavors. Linux gives you hundreds of different distributions. Both philosophies have their advantages and disadvantages.

In summery: *BSD is very good at a few tasks, if these tasks are what your computing needs are, then *BSD is a good choice. Otherwise look at Linux for a broader base of possibilities.
 
Old 07-01-2002, 02:43 PM   #21
MobyTurbo
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chijtska
but... what CANT you do with linux that you CAN do with BSD?
BSD UNIX can run many Linux binaries, while Linux can't run BSD binaries. So technically BSD has a larger software base. Source code too, most anything for Linux can be ported to BSD; and FreeBSD has a huge built-in ports tree of ready to fetch and install programs with no RPM dependency hell. (The other BSD's have ports and packages too.) BSD has a number of security features that Linux doesn't have. It also has a superior virtual memory system.

The main thing about Linux is that it makes a better workstation because many distributions have GUI configuration tools. Linux also has better hardware support, nVidia cards don't have reliable 3D OpenGL acceleration yet due to nVidia's binary drivers. I also had a bit of a hard time getting my USB keyboard to work; though it works now. Linux also has journaled file systems, though arguably BSD's soft update system and more robust FFS file system make journaling unnecesary.
 
Old 07-15-2002, 02:34 PM   #22
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Re: interesting...

Quote:
Originally posted by orgcandman
have). Linux, however, supports many more devices and has one thing that is keeping me with it... a naitive JVM.
FreeBSD since 4.5 (current version is 4.6, soon to be 4.6.1) has a native JVM. They require that you download the Java source and the Linux 1.3 JVM in order to install it because Sun won't let them distribute it on their CDs until it has hot-spot support (which FreeBSD is working hard on), but if you don't need that you can use native Java now.
 
Old 07-15-2002, 02:48 PM   #23
MobyTurbo
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Quote:
Originally posted by wartstew
Some of the earlier comparisons have been made between *BSD and RedHat Linux. Although Redhat is very popular, *BSD would compare a lot closer to Debian GNU/Linux or Slackware.
Or to Gentoo's Portage which is modeled after it. I agree that it's more difficult to set up, but once you've gotten it running it's easier to *use*. BSD inits and the port system make it much easier to maintain. You want to install a package? CD to the proper directory in the ports tree ("make search" at /usr/ports if you can't find it), and run "make install && make clean". It'll download it, and all required dependencies (no more RPM DLL hell) from the internet if it's not on your CD-ROM automatically. (If you don't want to compile it from the source you can run pkg_add -r)
Quote:
In summery: *BSD is very good at a few tasks, if these tasks are what your computing needs are, then *BSD is a good choice. Otherwise look at Linux for a broader base of possibilities.
A few tasks? FreeBSD has more programs available in it's ports tree than most Linux distributions, 7,001 programs currently. I've found a lot of stuff there that isn't even in my SuSE Pro distribution, and that distro is famous for having the most packages. If it isn't in the ports tree, Linux binaries usually run, and Linux source code is usually trivial to port. Though I haven't found many cases where that's neccesary since usually somebody else has done it for me.

Last edited by MobyTurbo; 07-15-2002 at 02:53 PM.
 
Old 07-17-2002, 09:25 PM   #24
sancho5
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True. Install FreeBSD and browse through your ports tree. It wont' be a quick task.

But porting, schmorting. If you really need an app, and don't see it in ports, big deal. There is relatively little today that is not availbable as source code relying only on a compiler and maybe autoconf, etc. Grab the tarball and go to town.

Interestlingly, one of the problems ppl run into is that some source (possibly designed on GNU/Linux systems) mysteriously doesn't compile on their *BSD system. HINT: install gmake and retry using gmake rather than make - it's solved a lot of my compilation headaches.

If you've hit the end of your line, hit the mailing list for your build and talk to the users. Chances are after you've hits wit's end with everything, someone can clue you in on what you're missing (source code edit, configure switch, etc.)

Using all this, I expect there's relatively little sofware you can't run on your *BSD system.
 
  


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