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Old 05-25-2018, 05:22 AM   #16
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxuser7 View Post
Although I do use Linux, I have never taken the default configuration at face value. The fun of Linux is customization, and no matter which distribution I use, I change it extensively to make it "mine."
Then you should not have any problems. It is not a case of "configuring from scratch." Generally speaking, configuration is installing the applications one wants and making appropriate adjustments to configuration files.
 
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Old 05-25-2018, 06:22 AM   #17
Trihexagonal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatmac View Post
Once you have the basics of BSD under your belt, it would be worth looking at both OpenBSD & NetBSD too.
I've never had a NetBSD box, but if you can run a FreeBSD box you can run OpenBSD no problem. There is very little difference in the way things are structured and done, the only difference a few basic commands as I see it.

When I rebuild my OpenBSD boxen, and I always rebuild as opposed to upgrade any of my machines, I can have my base system and all my 3rd part pkg's installed in just over an hour or so, depending on what else I've got going. Then I can boot to a desktop, change things around so I can use Flubox, and it's basic document config and setting the options for the programs you've installed from that point.

When I rebuild my FreeBSD desktops using ports it's an all day thing, and I mean the better part of 24 hours on my machines, but what I prefer as opposed to pkg so I do all 4 at once to save time. I have a set number of programs I install every time and it's hard to get a more custom desktop than when you build that way.
 
Old 05-25-2018, 08:55 AM   #18
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With reference to OpenBSD, I've moved away from running -stable to just running -release with syspatch(8).

This is partially due to a lack of time and also due to the increased build times now that llvm/clang is part of base (and the base compiler for i386/amd46 and I can't remember which others) on my not-so-quick, aging hardware.

//edit: With OpenBSD it's recommended not to build packages from source, unless you're running -stable or -current. The packages you build from source should be identical to those installed via pkg_add(1). Unless you're changing compile flags or doing something else interesting, there's just no need.

Last edited by cynwulf; 05-25-2018 at 09:08 AM.
 
Old 05-25-2018, 09:28 AM   #19
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
With reference to OpenBSD, I've moved away from running -stable to just running -release with syspatch(8).
I also prefer to run OpenBSD -release. I have used FreeBSD since 5.x and OpenBSD since 5.0. I've taken NetBSD for a spin. My preference for BSDs is OpenBSD. The documentation for OpenBSD is second to none and OpenBSD is secure and very robust.
 
Old 05-25-2018, 01:17 PM   #20
linuxuser7
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Thank you guys. Everyone's responses are very helpful and gives me insight.
 
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Old 05-25-2018, 09:11 PM   #21
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From a structural perspective, the BSDs are cohesive operating systems. This is a different structure than Linux, which is essentially a consolidated kernel and a variety of distributions that package userland facilities, graphical systems, and other "infrastructure" services. Both Linux and BSDs are considered "Unix-like" operating systems.

From a technical perspective, each major BSD variant (Free, Net, Open, and Dragonfly) is now relatively unique. Open and Dragonfly were forks of Net and Free, respectively, and the code bases have diverged over the years. However, there is cross-pollination of select features and select technical components.

From a cultural perspective, they are each quite different. Though, as a group the BSDs are far more similar to each other than they are to any Linux system.

If there is one cultural aspect that sets the BSDs together as a group apart from Linux, it is their very robust, excellent published documentation. This includes their man pages, and the additional official handbooks/faqs found on each BSD project website. You will find far fewer unofficial "How To" documents published by BSD users than you will for Linux. This is primarily because of the excellence of the documentation, and secondarily due to the BSDs' general cultural tendency to strive towards end-user self-sufficiency as a goal.

Last edited by jggimi; 05-25-2018 at 09:40 PM. Reason: I can't type a single sentence without a typo
 
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Old 05-25-2018, 09:32 PM   #22
frankbell
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I recommended FreeBSD because of the learning experience of building it using the FreeBSD handbook. Doing so really is a great way to learn how BSD works.

Speaking strictly as user, well, I do have an OpenBSD baseball cap and tee shirt.

I may have misread OP's post, but I got the impression he wanted to learn about BSD, not just use it.

Last edited by frankbell; 05-25-2018 at 09:35 PM.
 
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Old 05-26-2018, 02:35 PM   #23
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
I may have misread OP's post, but I got the impression he wanted to learn about BSD, not just use it.
Indeed. He should try them out and see which BSD he prefers. They're all exceptional.
 
Old 05-27-2018, 02:48 AM   #24
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trihexagonal View Post
Makes an awesome .mp3 player, too. Here's mine running FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE-p10:
you have a laptop only for playing jimi hendrix!
 
Old 05-27-2018, 03:19 AM   #25
Trihexagonal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
you have a laptop only for playing jimi hendrix!
If you notice it's playing War Heros, too.

Harley Quinn has a screenshot of her own T400 posted in the BSD thread.
 
Old 05-27-2018, 09:14 AM   #26
linuxuser7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
I may have misread OP's post, but I got the impression he wanted to learn about BSD, not just use it.
You are correct. I do want to learn about it, but I also want to use it. Just like I do Linux. Right now, I am leaning towards openBSD, and I've been spending time on their website reading their materials.

Thanks again everyone for your kind advice! I appreciate it all.
 
Old 05-27-2018, 09:29 AM   #27
un1x
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The win$UCK$ of BSD: ghostbsd.org
keep that in mind...
 
Old 05-27-2018, 08:46 PM   #28
un1x
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https://ghostbsd.org/
 
Old 05-28-2018, 12:15 AM   #29
Trihexagonal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by un1x View Post
The win$UCK$ of BSD: ghostbsd.org
keep that in mind...
I have tried TrueOS but not GhostBSD. He provides an alternative to TrueOS, and personally is a pretty nice guy from what I know of him.

What's wrong with that? Aside from thinking:

Quote:
Originally Posted by un1x View Post
BSD is 4servers !
Though I will admit to once referring to PC-BSD as the "MicroSoft of the BSD world" in a rant. But that was after going to that place where the only definition of reason is causation.
 
Old 05-28-2018, 05:23 AM   #30
Randicus Draco Albus
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I took GhostBSD for spin years ago. I believe it was only the third release. That early in the project there were obviously bugs, but they were minor and very small in number. I have not tried it since, but I was thoroughly impressed by how good the system was considering it was still in its infancy and was a one-man project. With several more years of development behind it, I assume it is pretty good now. If I decided for some reason to install a pre-configured FreeBSD, I would choose GhostBSD long before considering TrueOS.
 
  


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