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Old 09-11-2017, 10:40 PM   #1
hd_scania
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Smile Linux fs and BSD distro?


I have now a desire to try some BSD distro, but before trying them I need to clarify, which the kernels, the BSD-like licenses, the few etc files differently placed other than Linux, finally installing software packages are at least which we can tell Linux apart BSD.
However, I am quite puzzled, which the certain Linux fs are BSD compatible the rest are not, so which ones are ‘‘yes’’ here?
 
Old 09-12-2017, 04:28 AM   #2
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hd_scania View Post
I have now a desire to try some BSD distro
There are no BSD distros. Each BSD is an operating system with its own kernel, base system and ports/packages.

Quote:
However, I am quite puzzled, which the certain Linux fs are BSD compatible the rest are not, so which ones are ‘‘yes’’ here?
If fs refers to file system formats, like FAT32, ext4, etc., BSD systems can read and write to devices in most formats. (OpenBSD can read but not write to NTFS.)

Quote:
the BSD-like licenses, the few etc files differently placed other than Linux
I do not remember most of the details about the BSD licence, so I shall let someone else explain it. Basically, anyone is allowed to use the code for any purpose as long as they give credit to the source. Visiting the websites of the BSD projects would be helpful. They have this and much more information. (There is a copious amount of good documentation. Be prepared to read it.)


Quote:
finally installing software packages are at least which we can tell Linux apart BSD.
I do not understand what are you are trying say.

Last edited by Randicus Draco Albus; 09-12-2017 at 04:29 AM.
 
Old 09-12-2017, 09:09 PM   #3
hd_scania
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So which BSD systems are recommended to me, which I am experienced in Linux but new to BSD?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
There are no BSD distros. Each BSD is an operating system with its own kernel, base system and ports/packages.
Of course BSD system r/w Linux fs but are BSD systems RUN on these fs?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
If fs refers to file system formats, like FAT32, ext4, etc., BSD systems can read and write to devices in most formats. (OpenBSD can read but not write to NTFS.)
I remember the BSD licensing schemes are PERMISSIVE ones, including Apache for SourceForge and APSL for WebKit and X11Quartz, a significant CON is nonfree tolarance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
I do not remember most of the details about the BSD licence, so I shall let someone else explain it. Basically, anyone is allowed to use the code for any purpose as long as they give credit to the source. Visiting the websites of the BSD projects would be helpful. They have this and much more information. (There is a copious amount of good documentation. Be prepared to read it.)
I mean the packages mgt systems for the BSD systems, though of course they are commands like ones in Linux.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
I do not understand what are you are trying say.

Last edited by hd_scania; 09-12-2017 at 10:32 PM.
 
Old 09-12-2017, 09:24 PM   #4
frankbell
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I would recommend starting with FreeBSD. The FreeBSD Handbook is one of the best bits of documentation I've ever seen.

Work your way through it and you will learn more about BSD than with any other flavor of BSD.
 
Old 09-12-2017, 09:56 PM   #5
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FreeBSD can be installed as binary OS or it can be built from source - like Gentoo Linux. Building from source has its advantages, you can specify the CPU you are building for, etc. I do not think it can be reliably installed to a Linux filesystem. Not a good idea.
 
Old 09-12-2017, 10:07 PM   #6
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hd_scania View Post
So which BSD systems are recommended to me, which I am experienced in Linux but new to BSD?
The best advice is to visit the websites for FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD and DragonflyBSD and read the descriptions of the systems and some of the documentation, such as installation instructions, system configuration and package management. That will give you a good idea if one or more of them would meet your needs. If it appears to be too much of a learning curve, look at GhostBSD and TrueOS, which are pre-configured FreeBSD. There is not that much learning for someone with experience using Linux who knows how to use a terminal and do basic configuration. If a person's experience is limited to point-and-click and does not want to learn how to use a terminal, the best option is probably TrueOS.

Quote:
Of course BSD system r/w Linux fs but are BSD systems RUN on these fs?
BSD systems do not use Linux formats. OpenBSD for example, uses FFS. Although the format of the system's file system is irrelevant. It is the format of the files that matters. A .jpg is the same on Linux, BSD, OSX and Windows.

Quote:
I remember the BSD licensing schemes are PERMISSIVE ones, including Apache for SourceForge and APSL for WebKit and X11Quartz, a significant CON is nonfree tolarance..
Tolerance for non-free software varies. FreeBSD is probably the most tolerant, while OpenBSD has no tolerance.

Quote:
I mean the packages mgt systems for the BSD systems, though of course they are commands like ones in Linux.
Adding binary packages is the same as with Linux, using simple shell commands, such as "pkg_add name_of_package" (OpenBSD). The difference is that some applications need to be configured after installation. Packages can also be installed as ports, which is a more invovled procedure.
 
Old 09-12-2017, 10:51 PM   #7
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FFS? Do you stand this for the Unix-like Fast filesystems? I look these incompatible with Linux. There are nowhere to mount them on Linux? I have been also said, which ext2, btrfs, jfs, ReiserFS, xfs, zfs from Linux are also compatible (unsure) for BSD systems, but are they recommended to my BSD installations?

Last edited by hd_scania; 09-12-2017 at 10:52 PM.
 
Old 09-12-2017, 11:06 PM   #8
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Actually there is at least one FreeBSD distro: TrueOS. It's basic FreeBSD kernel, tools and utilities, and libraries, with a lot of defaults, and a few packages, set in advance to provide a lot of polish as a desktop. If you are going to start on the desktop and want something already put together, then it is the way to go. It is highly recommended, if you can find supported hardware.

If you need a file system to move between one of the GNU/Linux distros and FreeBSD then I would look at EXT2. It is probably available in FreeBSD, it certainly works in OpenBSD but as pointed out above that is a seperate operating system. Only use EXT2 for specific media or partitions that you will user for transfer between the two operating systems. For the main activities and system components stick with what the operating systems recommend.
 
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Old 09-13-2017, 12:47 AM   #9
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I think I need to try openBSD, TrueOS, kFreeBSD, NetBSD, pfSense as my first BSD systems, and I will be feed back here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
Actually there is at least one FreeBSD distro: TrueOS. It's basic FreeBSD kernel, tools and utilities, and libraries, with a lot of defaults, and a few packages, set in advance to provide a lot of polish as a desktop. If you are going to start on the desktop and want something already put together, then it is the way to go. It is highly recommended, if you can find supported hardware.

If you need a file system to move between one of the GNU/Linux distros and FreeBSD then I would look at EXT2. It is probably available in FreeBSD, it certainly works in OpenBSD but as pointed out above that is a seperate operating system. Only use EXT2 for specific media or partitions that you will user for transfer between the two operating systems. For the main activities and system components stick with what the operating systems recommend.

Last edited by hd_scania; 09-13-2017 at 12:54 AM.
 
Old 09-13-2017, 03:30 AM   #10
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Is it a fact which BSD systems NOT YET see ext4 OR ext3 filesystems, and is ext2 surely best one from Linux to install BSD systems?
 
Old 09-13-2017, 03:39 AM   #11
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EXT2 should not be used for the installation, just the partitions or removable media that you will share between the different operating systems.

FreeBSD can use EXT4 read-only. So if you want to write to the shared partition, use EXT2. Otherwise, for TrueOS(FreeBSD) you can stick with ZFS.

GNU/Linx might catch up with them on ZFS support, someday, but the original company with ZFS appears to have gone out of their way to intentionally create a license that is incompatible with the GPL.
 
Old 09-13-2017, 03:53 AM   #12
Randicus Draco Albus
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I admit the language barrier possibly prevented me from understanding the OP's intention. If it is for multiple OSes to share a partition used to store files, as Turbocapitalist states, then yes, ext2 or FAT32 will allow the two or more OSes to share the files. If the intention is to install a BSD system with a foreign file system, save yourself a lot trouble and do not attempt it.
 
Old 09-13-2017, 06:44 AM   #13
hd_scania
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Oracle now maintains the zfs which they have authored it when they were Sun Microsystems, and Linux needs fuse to mount the zfs partitions.
But what are the troubles installing BSD systems into ext2?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
EXT2 should not be used for the installation, just the partitions or removable media that you will share between the different operating systems.
FreeBSD can use EXT4 read-only. So if you want to write to the shared partition, use EXT2. Otherwise, for TrueOS(FreeBSD) you can stick with ZFS.
GNU/Linx might catch up with them on ZFS support, someday, but the original company with ZFS appears to have gone out of their way to intentionally create a license that is incompatible with the GPL.
 
Old 09-13-2017, 10:42 AM   #14
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Maybe you should tell us why. BSD use extended attributes on their native filesystems, I'm even not sure if ext2 complies with all requirements.
 
Old 09-13-2017, 10:46 AM   #15
un1x
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try this:

http://www.ghostbsd.org/

let´s say ... it is a win$UCK$ on BSD ... ah , u can install it on ZFS >>>

 
  


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