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sidux 2009-01
Reviews Views Date of last review
1 17111 02-23-2009
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated 10.0



Description: "A little earlier than originally planned, we now have the pleasure to announce the availability of sidux 2009-01, shipping with kernel 2.6.28.6-rc1. It concentrates on integrating the changes caused by kernel 2.6.28, stabilising the init optimisations accomplished by insserv, and in particular improving the reliability of the installer and the USB installers. Kernel 2.6.28 doesn't only improve and stabilise hardware support for newer devices, it also adapts the I/O scheduler support for SSDs in order to improve prioritisation of disk access and to speed these up. Another major accomplishment is the deployment of the open-source OpenFWWF firmware for Broadcom wireless devices."
Keywords: insserv installer SSDs OpenFWWF


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Old 02-23-2009, 04:31 PM   #1
masinick
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: Debian, sidux, antiX, SimplyMEPIS, Kubuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, Xandros, Arch, and many others
Posts: 560

Rep: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: cutting edge, fast, flexible, works
Cons:



This is the easiest, fastest, most reliable way to get cutting edge software, and keep having the latest changes, as often as you want them.

sidux 2009-01 is the latest in the series of (approximately) quarterly update releases. You really do not need to get and install the updated release each time one comes out - just install one, then update as a rolling release from there.

You can get a rather nimble implementation of KDE, which sidux developers call KDE-lite, you can get XFCE, both, or you can install, perhaps the xfce version, then get rid of it and put in what you want! The sidux and Debian Sid repositories certainly offer enough choices, and the optional (but really useful) smxi utility can help you install a variety of desktop and window managers, as well as many other applications and tools to tailor your system the way that you want it.

The base install is one of the fastest you are likely to find. Highly compressed, the sidux developers warn you to burn sidux CDs at low speed and using DAO as the method. However, copying the ISO image to USB is an even faster way to install the software!

I've had base installations take 2:45, that's two minutes and forty five seconds, then I've had some of the main stuff take anywhere from six to fifteen minutes to add in. Realistically, running smxi a few times and installing a bunch of other stuff, it could be 20-45 minutes to have the system just the way you want it, but you can have something that can at least access the wired network in under ten minutes, in fact, just a couple of minutes, if you run sidux live before installing.

Wireless access requires enabling the firmware, which sidux refuses to include in the base system, but does make it readily available.

sidux is a great, cutting edge distro. Yes, I know there are other cutting edge distros - Arch, Gentoo, Sabayan, maybe a few others. Debian Sid, of course, is the distro upon which sidux is based. I feel that sidux adds significant useful value to Debian Sid, at least if you are either an i86 or AMD user, which is most of us. What it adds is:

1. An extremely fast way to install a Sid based distro.
2. An outstanding collection of cutting edge kernels that have the very latest in hardware detection.
3. An excellent assortment of scripts that greatly assist in the management, configuration, setup, and support of sidux software. These scripts speed things up, but they also help to tame the extremely volatile nature of Debian Sid, harnessing its power and turning it into something even more useful and valuable. With sidux, Debian Sid truly becomes the most current OS that you can actually count on, and I recommend it highly, as long as you enjoy volatile software and are willing to update often.
 




  



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