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Slackware 10.2
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45 226482 01-12-2007
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98% of reviewers $24.95 9.5
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Description: Slackware 10.2 includes the Linux 2.4.31 kernel, with Linux 2.6.13 available in the /testing directory. For the first time, a 2.6 kernel with support for SCSI, RAID, and SATA is offered as a boot option in the installer (called "test26.s"). Slackware 10.2 also sports a new revision of glibc (2.3.5) with NPTL support for improved thread performance when using a kernel with NPTL support, the latest KDE 3.4.2 and XFce 4.2.2 desktop environments, updated development tools, and new additions like SASL support in sendmail, the Subversion version control system, the Firefox browser, and the Thunderbird email and news client.
Keywords: Slackware Slack Linux Best Distro 10.2 New Frugalware Rubix Ware


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Old 06-03-2006, 11:04 AM   #1
_invader
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 25

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Best distro I've used so far, pure clean linux, relatively n00b friendly
Cons: Odd bits left for you to configure post install, tweaks galore, no default automount (aka Mandrake), other minor problems (below)



As you can see, it's impossible to summarise Slackware 10.2 just on 'pros and cons' one-liners :) . Speaking as a relative-reborn-again-newbie user (started on Windows, migrated to Mandrake 10.0, shifted back to Windows XP, now moved onto Slack), I found Slackware overall a very satisfying distro. This is partially due to my old hardware (a PIII 1-GHz machine) which translates to highly stable driver/software support.

The only other distro I've seriously used before this was Mandrake 10.0 CE, a much (perhaps the most?) n00b-friendly Linux, so bits of my experience here will be comparing with Mandrake. Installation was very clean despite the absence of fancy GUI's - partition, choose packages, install, post-configure. Boot was much cleaner and faster compared to Mandrake (which paused for 2+ minutes trying to load eth0 despite the network being absent). Slackware was able to boot into KDE straight away (after console login) and was pretty much functional in every aspect - the sound and network card worked straight away, which was not the case in Mandrake, so I was quite pleased. The only whinge I have at that point was the absence of an 'automount' feature for CD-ROMs and ejectable media as seen in Mandrake (although it could be argued you the system is less prone to mount stuff-ups if manual un/mounting is used, which I have experienced).

However the bits that perhaps frustrate newbies most is the many tweaks needed to get Slackware to boot/run the way you want. For me, I had to tweak LILO's boot up delay (I am still on dual boot with XP, which frustratingly had earlier mucked up my primary/logical partition settings forcing a total reformat of the HDD and clean reinstall), install NVIDIA's graphics drivers, enable the mouse scrollwheel (I still can't get the 'forward' and 'back' buttons on the optical Intellimouse to work as in Windows), and set mount points for my USB drive and the second CD-ROM drive. None of these involved much hair-tearing work fortunately (again due to my past experience with tweaking Mandrake), although a few config files were different (e.g. xorg.conf replaces XF86Config.conf - yes, I have been out of touch with Linux/X11 for a while!). Also having an iPAQ PDA, I to download and compile SynCE to transfer files to and from the device, which didn't present as a major issue though I cannot get 'hotplug' to work with that device. Overall there was more time spent tweaking compared to Mandrake, although I do still think there is quite a learning curve involved with Slackware as other users have experienced.

Funnily enough, I still can't assign the 'Windows' and 'Menu' key to activate the KDE and context menus respectively.

Software included with the distro covers everything I would ever need in daily use, although I had to install my own personal favourites not included in Slackware - XMMS and OpenOffice.org 2.02 (sorry KOffice ;) ). OpenOffice would not install through RPMs smoothly so I had to recompile the packages into .tgz's which worked although Gnome/KDE GUI integration is now absent (so OpenOffice looks somewhat crap at the moment with dull-grey widgets). It would be better if these two packages were included in the CD on its next release. So far, I've also been unable to find an applet to monitor network card traffic (similar to kppp) which docks into the panel - no doubt including something like that would also improve its appeal!

So the bottom line - Slackware is one awesome Linux distro despite the need for (numerous) subsequent tweakings - once it's running as you like it, its likely you WILL like it :p . As far as concerned, its likely I'm going to live with this distro for a few good years (maybe until my PC finally carks it?). I would recommend it to any Linux user, newbie or expert, though I would be still sympathetic if newbies still flock towards the likes of Mandrake or Ubuntu. Cheers to the folks behind Slackware!

(PS If anyone can help me with my little issues i.e. automount, mouse buttons and key assignments, I certainly appreciate your help! Thanks)
 
Old 06-05-2006, 12:11 PM   #2
varaahan
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Distribution: Puppy, Arch Linux,Absolute Linux
Posts: 83

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Rock solid distro
Cons: nothing I Know


Slackware has always been my favourite. It made me learn linux.
I have tried quite a number of distros and at any given point
of time I have more than one linux distro apart from windows and
definitely I will be having either Slackware or one of its
derivatives like Vector linux.
And I love it. It never makes you a slave of the distro but
you get addicted to it. If you are comfortable with Slackware,
you can boldly try any other distro. Slackware is the base of
linux learning.

Boovarahan S
 
Old 06-07-2006, 04:05 AM   #3
 
Registered: Dec 1969
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy to use, very well designed, A good round based linux for newbies and pros.
Cons: kde is a bit bloated, Doesnt support Microinnovation mice, gnome no longer comes preinstalled, no emerge feature


Great Linux Distro.. This was my first Linux distro ever, I heard good things about it from a friend and decided to give it a try. Being a linux noobie it spoon fed me all the information required to install on the slackware cd. I admit it took me 3 or 4 times to get the hang of it, but everything worked itself out. Anything really hard to fix I just asked someone in the #slackware irc channel under freenode network, and most of them knew right off what the solution to my problem was. codyzapp
 
Old 06-07-2006, 09:30 AM   #4
jeelliso
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: OpenSUSE, Ubuntu
Posts: 250

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Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 7

Pros: Fast, configurable system; quick boot times
Cons: Bad hardware recognition


I tested Slackware 10.2 on a Compaq Presario M2105US laptop. It has a 1.6GHz Mobile Sempron Processor w/ 1GB RAM and, of coure, a CD/DVD Drive.

The installation went smoothly and, for a newbie, would prove to be a very valuable learning experience. A big plus was that I was able to strip down my installation to exactly what I wanted and nothing more. You get to choose every package other than the 'core' packages. This makes for a very fast, consistent system.

After the installation, my opinion changed a little. First of all, I think Lilo is bad; it has its limitations, thus I think Grub is better. Then, Slackware did not correctly configure either of my mice (touchpad & USB), my sound, or my X server. I had to manually rework my xorg.conf file basically from the ground up. For a fully developed distro, this should not be the case. In addition, my system clock was misconfigured as the clock was running almost twice the speed it should. I've had this problem with Debian, but not with Fedora, PC Linux OS, Gentoo, or FreeBSD. I have yet to find a workaround or permenant fix. To me, this is just another sign of bad hardware recognition. Other than that, it seemed just like Linux should, only faster than I'm used to.

Conclusion: If speed is an absolute must, and you will sacrifice anything to get it, the Slackware may be the distro for you. Otherwise, I just don't think it can compare to the other distros available. Unfortunantly, I will be moving back to my previous distro.
 
Old 07-23-2006, 07:18 PM   #5
nykey
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Distribution: OpenSUSE 11.1 / echo "Windows XP" > Trash
Posts: 360

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: The best: fast, most stable, newbie friendly but get's your hands a bit dirty, just how I like it
Cons: none worth to be mentioned, in my opinion


Slackware is by far the best GNU/Linux distro. I've tried them all (Red Hat (Fedora), Mandrake (Mandriva), SuSE, (K)ubuntu, debian, gentoo, and many more and none satisfied me as Slackware did, so they didn't last more than 24 hours on my PC. Since my first install, I only had minor problems, like my Digital Camera, All-In-One printer, and few others not worth mentioning, but all felt into place pretty fast, thanks to the Slackware community on this forum which is a very BIG pro for Slack. Thank you Patrick and thank you all Slackware users.
 
Old 08-19-2006, 10:15 PM   #6
harrygraham
 
Registered: Apr 2001
Distribution: Ubuntu Gnome
Posts: 153

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Works well on older hardware
Cons: Not a huge selection of apps


Slackware is really great for restoring old Pentium IIs and Celerons to very serviceable machines. Even with limited space you can still install everything. I did a full install on an 8 gig hard drive and it's quite well-matched. It runs almost as well on the old Cleleron 333 as on my Pentium 4!

Slackware is very stable. You can tinker with it and it won't self-destruct. After installing the works, you can recompile the kernel to get better performance. Also, you can download program's source code and roll your own programs with ease. It's a lot easier than making packages or recompiling the kernel in Debian. Making your own ALSA drivers in this way is far better than the automatic sound configurations in most distros. Just follow the instructions at the ALSA website. It works well.

So if you're after stability and good craftsmanship, Slackware will make you happy. If you want everything working out of the box, however, maybe Ubuntu would be a better choice for you.
 
Old 08-25-2006, 02:28 AM   #7
toby.harvey
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Slackware10.2
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: clean, robust and straightforward
Cons: masses of sw included (is that a con?)


I have been using Slackware since 8.0 and always enjoyed my Slack experience. However these older versions were not always perfect on default install (no surprises there) so needed some tweaking and config work to meet my needs. This is actually one of the things I initially liked about Slackware as it always worked on any of my boxes.

In my opinion 10.2 is vastly improved from 10.0 and I have been very pleased with the included software. I am still running my first install and playing with all the bits, before planning a serious install sometime down the track. I know that once configured my Slack box will run fast and stable for whatever task I assign it and I love being Slack :)
 
Old 08-31-2006, 09:20 PM   #8
Ryuga Akikawa
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Posts: 12

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Very fast, clean and stable distro. Friendly community that is always willing to help
Cons: Minor tweaks needed to have everything functional, may be daunting to newbies


My first experience with any linux distro would be SuSe and PClinuxOS. Both very n00b friendly and windows-esque, leaving me very little to do in my end. I was very dissatisfied with this and decided to try Slackware.

I installed Slackware on my 6518GZ Gateway Laptop. Installation took roughly 20 minutes, including making my own partitions. Afterwards I was left with a shiny new Slackware system.

Was it happily-ever-after? NO WAY! After install I had a lot of work cut out for me, namely getting my wireless, power monitor and sound to work properly. Unfortunately since I am very new to doing this sort of thing I was very lost and confused.

But the forums and various slackware sights were able to solve my issues in no time at all. The people in the forums were very friendly and patient with my newbie questions.

All in all I am very satisfied with my Slackware system and recommend this distribution to anyone and everyone.

If you are a newbie to Slackware or Linux in general I highly recommend for you to try this distribution. It is not as daunting or as scary as it may initially seem and there are always people willing to help.
 
Old 09-04-2006, 12:57 PM   #9
fireedo
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Posts: 342

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: stable and fast
Cons: hmm.......I dont really not what this mean... :)


just a few word.....I installed and run it....really great distro.
happy slaker :)
 
Old 09-05-2006, 04:05 PM   #10
johnbradley66
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $24.95 | Rating: 9

Pros: Simple to install, fast, stable and easy to use
Cons: What are they?!


I have used Slackware ever since Version 4.0. The latest one is the easiest yet to install and run on an Athlon XP 2000 straight out of the box and that includes X Windows.
After install the default fonts are clunky but that can be fixed by a very easy tweak.
I use Lilo withouty problems the config file is only about 6 lines. I Dual Boot my machine with Linux/Windows XP using a floppy disc to boot Linux using Lilo occasionally I have to replace the floppy - big deal!
The Sound is OK but is not easy to get working probably because I have an Audigy sound card which I don't think is fully supported in Linux.
The new package system is fantastic.
I have to use Eagle to get Broadband to work.
Its a great distro for compiling downloaded source software.
I use kernel 2.6.13 which was easy to recompile myself.

All together a very satisfying sytem to use, makes me get irritable when I have to use Windows XP.

When do we get the next version Pat, 10.2 seems to have been around quite a time.
 
Old 09-06-2006, 10:19 AM   #11
proliant_fan
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Fedora Core 1,4 and mandriva 2006
Posts: 31

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0

Pros: Not Bloated, Unixy
Cons: .tgz is a bit of a pain


I ran this on my Thinkpad and my Compaq Proliant as well as my Dell and other then the winmodem, graphics card (ati) and some odd server hardware it woks great.

I am studying computing in College and so Slack was a great way to get into it.

One question though, Is Dropline GNOME stable and modern? - i much prefer GNOME to kde.
 
Old 09-16-2006, 04:21 AM   #12
gani
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Distribution: OpenBSD, Slackware, XP
Posts: 347

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: easy, flexible, reliable, stable, secure, easy update through slapt-get update, gives Unix-like experience
Cons: i still don't know what to say here


Honestly I'm not fully utilizing Slackware as a desktop but more fully as an internet web, mail and e-mail anti-spam and anti-virus SMTP proxy.

What I've appreciated with Slackware is that it is built-in with most of the necessary support libraries that makes compiling of programs from source easy and will never disappoint you.

Its BSD style Unix-approach is what had attracted me since Iím also a user of OpenBSD. Slackware is really true with their words of creating a stable and easy to manage Linux distro and Iím attesting to that. Iím sure that this is attributed to Slackwareís good project leadership.

Their plain and simple rc.* shell scripts really provides greater flexibility like letting you shutdown automatically an application that was compiled from source (that doesnít have start/stop script) during reboot or shutdown by just editing and inserting (by just copying existing scripts) for your application. This is easy indeed even for average users or users with only few basic shell scripting background.

Slackware is a highly reliable and functional Linux distro built in simplicity.
 
Old 09-25-2006, 12:33 PM   #13
c4onastick
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 51

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stability, modularity, simplicity
Cons: Steep learning curve may frighten linux new commers


Slackware is the "purest" linux distro out there. Really it comes down to this. Slackware is the foundation onto which you build your server; its rock-solid, reliable, and modular. I really like that it doesn't have the frilly lace that comes with most other distro's. I've used Debian and a little bit of Gentoo, and I still prefer Slackware. It does take a little more learning and tinkering to get everything working right, but it is well worth the experience.
 
Old 10-03-2006, 05:18 AM   #14
warchibald
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Distribution: Slackware,SuSE, RHLinux-8
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Everything works just fine including installation procedure
Cons: Gnome not available except thru FreeRock Gnome; lprng relegated in favour of CUPS


Have been using Slackware since 9.1 (2003) The main advantages it offers are ease of configuration and simplicity especially in the package building/handling area.

I have had the advantage of possessing Naba Bakarti's excellent book called "Linux Secrets" since 1995. The book was distributed with a Slackware 3.1 (??) disk but still remains relevant today. Does anyone know what happened to the author?
 
Old 01-12-2007, 04:41 PM   #15
gte836q
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 1

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0

Pros:
Cons:


Hi Everyone

Ok, I am a new comer, I would like to use Slackware. I used it a long time a go, with the help of a friend. he did the download and installation for me. Now I dont know how to even get an ISO copy of the program. So that my computer will boot from the CD-ROM and then install Slackware on my un-partitioned portion of my hard drive.

COuld someone please help me with this?

Thanks

Nur
 
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