LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Reviews > Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password

Notices

Search · Register · Submit New Review · Download your favorite Linux Distributions ·
 

Slackware 10.1
Reviews Views Date of last review
48 235438 09-15-2005
spacer
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
96% of reviewers $25.00 9.1



Description: The first Slackware release of 2005, Slackware Linux 10.1 continues the long Slackware tradition of simplicity, stability, and security.

Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you'll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available today:
Xfce 4.2.0, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 3.3.2, the latest version of the award-winning K Desktop Environment. GNOME 2.6.1 with several upgrades and bug fixes compared with Slackware 10.0 is also included.
Keywords: slackware volkerding


Author
Post A Reply 
Old 06-19-2005, 09:34 PM   #1
gian2oo1
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: Slackware... Simplicity is bliss.
Posts: 62

Rep: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $25.00 | Rating: 10

Pros: All ascepts.
Cons: Some quirks such as keyboard issue in new Xorg but posted fix hours after.



I would use nothing else.
 
Old 06-21-2005, 08:19 AM   #2
koolmansam375
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.1
Posts: 8

Rep: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: It just works, very clean, programs look as developers intended
Cons: 2.6.x isnt default, no option to install GRUB instead of LILO, doesnt come with an official update tool


Installation:
In my opinion the install is very easy. It sure isnt flashy but it is still a very easy install. You partition your drive, enter "setup" and wham! installer. The installer guides you through everything very well. If you know what packages you need then you can customize it but otherwise a full install works fine. If you can do the Redhat/Fedora Core/Suse/Mandriva install or Ubuntu install you can do the Slackware install.

Theres no option to install GRUB from the installer (you can from the site). So I just installed LILO and then GRUB later

Post-Install:
This is where it is trickier. X isnt configured yet and it drops you into a command line with only the root user available. Then you have to log in, add a user, and configure X (if you want a window manager). You can edit inittab to boot straight into a graphical interface if you want also.

Use:
I love using Slackware. Most of the stuff just works (my wireless card didnt and I had to get ndiswrapper up). Sound only required an "alsaconf" to get working. Well since everything was working perfectly I decided to mess it up (^_^). I compiled a new 2.6.x kernel to replace the 2.4.x kernel. This stopped alsa from working because alsa needs to be compiled against the kernel. I also needed to recompile ndiswrapper. I also decided to try out the window managers I had installed but never used. I didnt install GNOME because I never like GNOME but when I installed Dropline Gnome I knew that was my perfect GUI. Keeping it updated is fairly easy, theres no default tool to do it but theres a bunch on the internet (two big ones are Swaret and Slapt-get).

IMO Slackware is the best distro. I <3 Slackware
 
Old 06-25-2005, 02:25 PM   #3
zWaR
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware, Alpine Linux, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 219

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: clean, smooth, fast and stable distro
Cons: 2.4. kernel


My first contact with Slackware .... i am amazed!!!! Tried once, addicted forever :)

What can i say - everything works perfectly fast and stable.
 
Old 07-01-2005, 11:50 AM   #4
Atrocity
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Distribution: FreeBSD, Slackware
Posts: 308

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 0

Pros: lightweight
Cons: long time between releases


I just recently returned to slackware, I have not used it since version 8 and I have to say i am liking it, you can install anything in slackware and it doesnt complain or give you errors like some other linux distros I have dealt with
 
Old 07-06-2005, 11:49 AM   #5
Linux_n00b_57
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Distribution: Slackware 11.0
Posts: 148

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 8

Pros: First Linux i've used.
Cons: From failed installations to unmountable burned CDs...


Well well well...I just started using linux and i'm confused. But i have to say i'm having so much fun learning, and so much fun being a total noob!
But 5 out of the 9 times i've installed this(Yes 9 times) i ran into this weird problem...when it should get to lilo it went:
99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99...
For three and a half lines.
And right now i'm having a problem trying to mount my burned CD that has WINE and some other crap on it...
I haven't found very many things on the internet that has been useful with helping me learn. but i'm posting uber noob questions all over the forum.
I'm not sure what to get it so i will say 8
 
Old 07-09-2005, 05:20 PM   #6
dangerboy
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware 12.1, Slackware Current, Ubuntu Hardy Heron 8.04
Posts: 110

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, everything works, up to date
Cons: X sometimes hangs under Kernel 2.6.10


For my purposes, Slackware 10.1 was easy to set up and I had little to no problem getting around. Even being a first time Slack user.

After learning how to fix the myriad of problems associated with Mandrake (Mandriva), getting everything set up was painless and stress free. Despite what many people think about Mandrake, if you want to use it for any serious purposes, you actually wind up learning linux well because of its buggy nature.

Which brings me to the reason I switched to Slack: I got absolutely tired of the many broken aspects of Mandrake and have found Slack's simplicity and stability refreshing. Seeing that I use my Linux Box for video editing, stability is a must because time is money.

The only con I have seen to this version is the fact that the X Env. hangs sometimes when envoked from the prompt. I'm sure this is something that is easily fixed, but it often requires a hard reboot which leads to journal recovery. But I am in no way perturbed. At least it's just one glitch, not the many problems associated with Mandrake.

As a side note, I found pkgtools to be much more intelligently designed than urpmi despite not having thousands of package choices. No more curl errors or bad signature messages to prompt you to update your sources which takes forever anymore as you never know which sites are up and maintained. I also like the fact that packages just install and the dependencies are left solely up to you. With Rpm2tgz you never have to go without something you want.

I give it a 10 because I can't give it a 9.6.
 
Old 07-14-2005, 12:32 PM   #7
AresXP
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 34

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: No bloat, text install
Cons: Comes with 2.4.29 kernel, requires a lot of initial configuration...


I don't why people still think installing Slackware with floppies is the only way to do it. I don't know... Slackware rocks. There's no bloatware, it doesn't rely on it's own packages like Ubuntu and Red Hat. The only thing that sucks is that pkgtool can't install packages from the web, you need to download them yourself. There is a fix for that however, swaret! swaret --upgrade -a will upgrade all your packages, just like debian's apt-get :)

The ncurses install is elite, straight forward and extremely fast!

Note: if you want gnome, install GSB and FRG
 
Old 07-19-2005, 03:35 AM   #8
r_x
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: slackware 10.1
Posts: 21

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: best distro...........lots of support
Cons: cant get ati radeon9200 to work with dri


this distro has the best support you can ever get ...ask 1 question and get 10 answers is what they say about slackware...and thats real !!
installation is not as difficult if you know your hardware well and the partitions are prepared beforehand.
plenty of scope for customization.
a fast system. very stable. plus you get to learn the real linux !!!
cons : needs to be shipped with 2.6 kernel
 
Old 08-04-2005, 04:47 PM   #9
digitalboy74
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: slack currrent
Posts: 61

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $25.00 | Rating: 10

Pros: simple, no dependencies, stable
Cons: requries work. Not for the lazy user that wants plug and pray


I have used slackware since version 4 that I bought online for 2.00 off of one of those cheap distro sites. The install was so painful that I installed RedHat shortly after that. After I learned what RPM was, and why package management was so broken, I reinstalled Slack and have not looked back.

If you desire full control over your library dependencies, and want to know every part of your system, slack is for you. The learning curve is steep, but the knowledge you gleam will apply across all other distributions (and BSD) and is very worthwhile.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 11:34 AM   #10
tuxombie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10, Ubuntu, Debian Sarge
Posts: 53

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Easy install, fast, no crashes
Cons: Not oriented for productivity initially, package management,


I have never had problems with Slackware since using it since 10.0. 10.1 is identical on the outside except for kde 3.3 which is not much of a change.

My very serious gripe with Slackware is Elvis, which took forever for me to get colored. The same with vim, which is fortunately much easier to color (the .vimrc file), and my choice editor. These are things that seriously affect productivity. The same with Gnuplot which doesnt have tab completion. It makes it pointless to supply gnuplot without this feature. A recompile is necessary to get it right. And I have only recently figured to make the default vi to vim by changing the symlink pointing vi to vim. But it was fun.

Slackware does the basics right, it gives a fully functional computer on which to build upon, unlike debian which could go wrong in ten thousand places and can make it look like a marathon race.

Still I think I prefer Debian because of apt-get which saved my Masters project because I cant get log-log plots in Slackware's gnumeric (again that stupid thing of not putting in important features), and its irritating downloading package after package. Like getting prosper for presentations, Open Office, Auctex (not really worth it, emacs is a comtraption anyway).

But overall, it is a nice distribution and once settled, there are no hiccups like 'Nautilus has crashed unexpectedly' or something like that. I am a big gnome fan, and it is sad to use the konsole which doesnt open in pwd in a new tab (there has to be a way out here)
 
Old 08-27-2005, 01:52 PM   #11
boudoirius
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware 12, OpenSuse 10.2, Mandriva 2008, Debian
Posts: 8

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: simplicity, speed, easy to administer without any GUI help
Cons: none


Slackware 10.1 is the first slackware linux distribution I've ever tried, having been a Mandrake (at home) and Red Hat (at work) user for years. I had some doubts trying Slackware because of its reputation as a very 'difficult' and complicated distribution. On the contrary I found slackware to be a very flexible and easy to install and use distribution.

During the installation process I didn't have to consult any FAQ's or user forums. It was speedy and each step was properly documented. Everything was in the right place and after a full installation I had my system running in a couple of hours. Needless to say that all the hardware components were correctly recognized.
The features of Slackware I like the most are its simplicity, its flexibility and its stability. The BSD-like organization of start-up scripts is very helpful and easy to manage. The packages it contains are very carefully selected and satisfy a very large scope of possible uses of a Linux System. The libraries that accompany Slackware are everything one needs to compile applications without any problems.

I have used slackware for many purposes: at work I have two DNS servers and one web development server running Slackware, at home its use is Desktop oriented. Until now nothing has gone wrong with it, not even when experimenting at home.

I recommend Slackware to everyone who wants to build a solid linux system and wants to have full control over it.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 11:36 AM   #12
eatmars
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Posts: 18

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: easy to install and all hardware was detected
Cons: you have to migrate to the new kernel by your own


it was easy to install, all of my hardware was detected so far and did not put an effort installing it. Running the os wow its very stable like the other slackware user said

but my only problem with slackware is that they dont use the latest kernel in installing it you have to install it using the 3rd cd and for a noob like me it will be months before i become familiar with this os and learn how to experiment with the kernel.
 
Old 08-30-2005, 02:29 PM   #13
mdkusr
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
Posts: 72

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 7

Pros: ATI drivers are quick to work, little configuration required
Cons: Better package management, maybe updgrade to apt


Well slackware excellent distro, but not excellent in areas that i like such as package management capability. Tgz is good and what not, just that it is not able to satisfy depency problems as apt is cabable of. My thoughts are that if slackware were to include apt, well this distro would be perfect. On a positive not, kernel compilation is most easiesty on this. Lilo is good with auto-updating the boot to kernel, except it is also a nightmare to try and dual-boot with.
Try this distro if you like having a pre-compiled distro but you still the option of adjusting different options
 
Old 08-31-2005, 09:33 PM   #14
digimafia
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Posts: 17

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: nice package manager, controlled installation
Cons: not for lazy people


the huge difference between slackware and other distributions is that you have to get your hands dirty in order to get things to work - unlike some distros where most drivers come pre-installed or automatically detected and configured for you; using slackware means you have to at times download the latest drivers, upgrade the kernel, edit configuration files, etc.

after finally fixing everything and getting all my hardware to work under slackware i made the decision today to get rid of windows forever... well not really. i will be using VMware Workstation under slackware to run windows and other operating systems and at times wine to run small applications. i even d/l slax today i'm sure it'll come in handy on the road - stupid me didn't even realize that those mini-cdr's work in your standard cd-drive! i thought they required special hardware. i plan on putting slax on one of them mini's - ultra light and ultra portable :-)

in choosing a windows manager i've decided to use neither KDE nor GNOME and will stick to the many smaller wmanagers like xfce and fluxbox i dont like to over work the cpu especially for nonsensical things such as running a windows manager - rather use that power for applications.

i'm sure most of you know this already but download checkinstall for slackware if you haven't yet. basically checkinstall is used in place of 'make install' during the 'configure && make && make install' process whereby checkinstall creates a .tgz file out of the .tar.gz extracts. then you can do 'installpkg package.tgz' which will be listed under pkgtool's package removal - its a great little program.

definetely try out slackware if you haven't and if you don't want to bother with repartitioning your hard drive or anything like that try slax.
 
Old 09-02-2005, 07:02 AM   #15
Vampirite
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Arch Linux
Posts: 223

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Stable, powerful, always worked with my system!
Cons: Kernel 2.4.29, Setup Program


Slackware Linux was always initmidating for me, but when I finally worked it out, it turned out to be better than I thought.

I have tried many distributions, Fedora, Ubuntu, SuSE, Mandrake, Conectiva, SLAX, and lots more! I have always found faults with them, Fedora didn't have many video/audio codecs and file compatibility, Ubuntu didn't configure my bootloader properly, SuSE slowed down my computer for some reason, Mandrake wouldn't boot up, Conectiva went out of business, and it was only when I got to SLAX that I found out about Slackware.

I had heard that Slackware was one of the most stable and powerful Linux's. Automatically I thought, "You're going to have to pay!" (Think Redhat) but no, Slackware was free, and I wanted to know more, so I goes to Slackware.com and click on the Install section, this is when I dismissed it, It was complicated with strange install, with "disk sets" and other strange things, so I'm like "eh?" so I goes and tries to find screenshots, I can't find much, so I leave it.

After circulating through hundreds of Linux Distributions, I go back to Slackware, and browse through one of it's mirrors. I find "Slackware-HOWTO" And I read it. I find that Slackware is easy to install, (I had been looking at an old install guide) and I dowloaded it. Then I got "Slackware Linux Essentials" After reading through that (With Screenshots!!!) I put the CD in, then begin the install, after flying through the installer, I then wait only about and hour or so for the install to complete. I then go through the config, and reboot.

I find a command line. I run "startx" and I see my GUI - KDE. After browsing around I decide I like it and add users, set up a graphical login, and now it is the best distro I've used.

After many customizations I thought Kernel. I tried to upgrade with the one on the Slackware CD (2.6.10) but then it wouldn't recognize my External HDD. So I revert back to 2.4.29, however I couldn't, after I remove the 2.6.10 kernel, I tried to boot up my Linux, however it died on me because of no Kernel, so I boot my system up with the recovery CD and remove all kernel packages, I then re-install them, and my Linux was saved!!!

Overall Slackware is one of the best Distributions I've used, though the installer could do with a remake, and a good Kernel would be nice, but overall Slackware is the best!
 
Old 09-10-2005, 12:45 PM   #16
Eternal_Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Distribution: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 573

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: The installer. It does'nt spoonfeed you. Stability is paramount but allows you freedom
Cons: a few niggles, but understandable ones.



With Slackware you get what you see and you see what you get. No smoke and mirrors

Unlike every other linux distro I have tried, the installer just _works_. It does it's job of getting Slackware up and running, nothing more nothing less. It detected and set up all my hardware, and Slackware is the _only_ distro of all I have tried that does this.

I would like to say that there is nothing odd about my hardware. Everything is standard stuff, nothing unusual apart from the remarkably ugly case :)

X worked perfectly in 1024x768 first time, just had to change driver to radeon from vesa to improve preformance.

Another reviewer complained about not being able to install OpenOffice. Can't talk about OOo 1.9.x, but OOo 1.1.4 installed and works without a hassle for me, just used the official binary package and followed the manual.

Sound is muted by default, which confuses newbies, but considering what a hassle setting up sound can be in distro's that claim to be multimedia friendly, I'm not heartbroken.

Yes, the package management tools are basic, but that forces you to keep track of eveything you have installed. If you want something fancier, there is slackpkg in /extras and at least 3 others freely avaliable on the internet.

Yes, It installs a 2.4 series kernel by default, but there is a 2.6 series in /testing. I have to say, now I know about the change in the kernel development process, I'm not surprised.

If something is not included, it is usually for a good reason (like having to recompile the kitchen sink). In any case you can usually find a slackware package or build it yourself.

The only problems I have had have all been caused by my own actions.

I've tried 2 versions of SUSE, 2 of Mandrake and 2 of Fedora, all recent. None of them detected my Microsoft USB mouse during install and about half couln't find my Cherry PS2 keyboard _during install_!. Have you ever tried to install without a keyboard? Never completed a Mandrake install.

Only Debian Sarge and Ubuntu installed without grief.
Even with those I had to setup my internet connection afterwards and do some major configuring (Sarge) or reconfiguring of XOrg (Ubuntu).

commandline and curses for installation without tears :)

I could not recommend Slackware to someone without patience, an allergy to manuals or straight from windoze, otherwise it is my perfect choice.

Edit: Spelling
 
Old 09-15-2005, 05:46 AM   #17
tankertuff
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: Slackware for now
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 3

Pros: None found yet.
Cons: Doesn't recognize my sound or mouse. Will not connect to my network.


Like I said, I haven't found anything to rave about with this distro. I'll admit, i did get away from the basic linux type system as i was using Mandriva, then Suse, so that's part of my problem, but it would be nice to be able to get your sound working after an initial install without having to configure all kinds of stuff. Since I've installed Slackware, I've been forced to use windows, and there's not really any mind blowing stuff included in the install. But I'll give them the benefit of the doubt and not rate it a 1. Again, maybe I just haven't spent a lot of time with it, but IMHO, I don't think you should have problems with sound or mouse functions right off the bat, and it doesn't recognize most of my hardware, not recommended for laptop users.
 
Old 09-15-2005, 09:13 PM   #18
Charred
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 816

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Incredible flexibility.
Cons: intermittent problems with the ID10T Interface.


My first Linux experience.
Finally, I have come across an OS that allows me to find out the "hows", "whys", and "wherefores" of my computer! And it COMES with documentation; no more drool-proof "help" file entries!

What a welcome breath of fresh air after so many years of Windows eXasPeration and getting sMac'd around!

Definitely not for everyone, but it met my needs perfectly.
 
Page:  1 · 2 




  



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:07 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement

My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration