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Slackware 9.1
Reviews Views Date of last review
67 243859 03-24-2005
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
99% of reviewers $31.02 9.5



Description: Slackware 9.1 contains many updates since 9.0. Also, its 2.6 kernel ready ;). It contains many new products and many updated ones, such as new AbiWord, Yelp for Gnome, newest KDE 3.1.4 and Gnome 2.4. It also contains Glade 2.0 and newest Gaim for slack. 0.68 i believe.....
Keywords: Slackware 9.1 linux


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Old 03-14-2004, 06:05 PM   #1
andzerger
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: slackware && freeBSD && rh9
Posts: 92

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: it boots fast and doesnt make arbitrary choices on my behalf
Cons: the HD installation was pickier than i expected it to be, and it took a while for me to get it straight



This is by far the best linux distro ive played with so far. Unlike on my RH based boxes, only root can reboot it. Im sure thats just the tip of the iceberg. Im using it primarily to force myself to learn more about linux, and so far its done a great job. Thanks slackware!
 
Old 03-16-2004, 06:25 AM   #2
Justin_Time
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Posts: 53

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy (KISS), no pre configurations, no changes to it's original owner
Cons: Only one developer


I use slackware now for almost 5 years and it has better and better. It let's you really get control of your system. And when you have configured your system to your need's it is so simple to make backup's or to install it on other systems.

The package management system is also great. No dependancy hell's way to go!
 
Old 03-16-2004, 07:48 AM   #3
thew00t
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: Slackware 9.1 and BSD 5.2
Posts: 28

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


 
Old 03-16-2004, 10:38 AM   #4
mhchavez99
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Distribution: Mandrake9.1
Posts: 18

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: fast, simple package management, not mdk-ized
Cons: not easy enough for most newbies


I'm using Mandrake 10 on my main machine, but one day I decided to try Slackware 9.1 on another machine. I was pleasantly surprised. Despite the lack of a graphical installer, installation was fairly easy. The package manager is also quite simple but effective even though it doesn't handle dependencies. I was suprised by the vast number of packages available from a single source, linuxpackages.net.

I've installed KDE 3.2 from linuxpackages.net and installed kernel 2.6.3 that I compiled from source. Having done so I now find that I prefer this machine to my other one running Mandrake 10. I would highly recommend this distro to anyone who already has a fair amount of experience with linux.
 
Old 03-16-2004, 01:21 PM   #5
c0reDump
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: fast, stable customizable
Cons: hard to get the ISO's


Been using Slackware since 3.1, like usual this distro is well thought out and runs very well and fast even on gimpy hardware.

Very good support for most hardware as well, some cutting edge hardware support not yet available, like Sata or Scsi 320 and some optical devices and integrated chipset devices (like sound or video)

Hard to find ISO's and using bit torrent what ever that is. Should have eveything on home site as most mirrors dont have ISO's either.

Over all not for noobs but awesome for experienced users.
 
Old 03-17-2004, 08:38 AM   #6
Nigel_Tufnel
 
Registered: Jul 2002
Distribution: Debian, Kubuntu, Arch
Posts: 116

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy install, fast startup, not bloated, very customizable
Cons: Doesn't automatically configure cdr/dvdr's


Slack is one of the original old guard distros like Debian. This is the distro to user after you've 'played' with RH or Mandrake. Swaret addresses my only gripe with Slack in the past. Being able to upgrade/install easily. Setting swaret to 'current' and sporatically updating your kernel will give you a cutting edge system. I just did a 2.6.4 kernel compile with no problems. Adding linuxpackages.net to your swaret repository list will enable you to get the latest/greatest precompiled packages: mplayer, kde 3.2, etc..
 
Old 03-17-2004, 09:34 AM   #7
jagerhans
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: debian lenny , lubuntu 11.10
Posts: 10

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: light, stable and clean
Cons: the procedure of adding software packages might be improved


In my experience it's the best linux release ever. Easy to install and rock solid. BSD-like init style allows easy vi-based maintenance, and it makes a good chance to learn more about it. The software packages included are stable and reliable. I am using it for qt development on an old home-assembled p200 and it works just fine. The only (forgivable) flaw I was able to spot is that pkgtool forces the user to review all the packages from the beginning up to the needed one... or did I misunderstand something?
 
Old 03-17-2004, 05:42 PM   #8
andrewlkho
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 548

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Ultra-configurable, good layout of filesystem
Cons: None!


As ever, Patrick and the rest of the Slackware team have managed another solid release. Slackware is by far my favourite distro and, despite what my profile on the left says [I'll have to update that at some point], I no longer run Debian because I am so satisfied with Slackware.

Slackware aims to be the most POSIX-compliant distro out there, and I can certainly say that it couldn't really be much better. After sesarching through many distros, I settled on this one, and I've never looked back. 9.1 is 2.6.x ready, which is something that not many distros can fully claim to be on their latest release.

The package system of .tgz files in Slackware is perfect. It goes along with the whole ethos of solid but minimalistic. The packages don't do any annoying dependancy resolve attempts that some package managers do, and furthermore, the packages aren't so extremely out of date, unlike the Debian stable tree.

The package browser on the website is also brilliant. It's the best package browser of them all (although you could argue that apt-get is something that doesn't even _need_ a package browser). The website is simple, and so loads fast.

All in all, the best distro IMHO. Great in every respect, and the install could hardly be called difficult. Despite the fact that it's text-based, it's configurable, enables for a minimal install, and installs a good initial kernel.

All hands to Patrick and the team.
 
Old 03-20-2004, 09:57 PM   #9
Razza2004
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10
Posts: 32

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, Easy to use once configured
Cons: Confusing if you moved from using Red Hat or Fedora


I was previously using Fedora Core 1 and decided to give Slackware 9.1 a try, and so far it's been great. Ive got everything to work I wanted, and got the 2.6.4 kernel running perfectly.
The only problem ive had with it, which isn't exactly a problem, is that I was used to using the GUI configuration tools in Red Hat and Fedora and was a little confused at first on how to set up things such as my network card. The slackware site however has some great documentation which guided me through setting these things up.
Overall a great Distro and I recommend it to anyone.
 
Old 03-20-2004, 10:00 PM   #10
slackwarefan
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 273

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, Efficent, Reliable
Cons: ?


Slack 9.1 is great, it comes with everything you need for anything. From Webservers to GUIs Slack has everything you need. I would Highly recommend this distro to anyone.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 05:40 PM   #11
verdeboy2k
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Distribution: Gentoo amd64, CrunchBang amd64
Posts: 350

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Works right off the CD, quick install, easy to customize
Cons: poor post install setup


I love Slackware. I am new to the distribution with 9.1 having migrated from RedHat 9. I like the fact that it has a very verbose boot display (tells one anything and everything). It also simplified install time customization by organizing the packages into series and leaving the packages in bigger chunks instead of RedHats having 20 packages for python 30 for perl etc. Just checking yes or no for perl or python or whatever is very nice.

However, post install setup is a pain. The install program dumps one into a bash prompt logged on as root. You have to run a configuration program for X (which usualy has to be manually tweaked) and most configuration has to be done by hand (unless you download a third party utility). However, most of the configurations worked out of the box, and if you are not new to Linux this a great distribution.

Despite all of the bloat, RedHat is very newbie friendly--slackware is not. If you are looking for stablilty and low overhead and quick installs, slackware is the way to go.
 
Old 03-24-2004, 06:10 PM   #12
tireseas
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Distribution: Slackware 10 & 10.1
Posts: 149

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stability, transparency, security, damn it - it just works!!!!!
Cons: what was that again ???


Man - I LOVE my Slack Machine!!!
I'm not biased, but I must say that it has been using Slackware for the last year and a bit (since 8.1) that has made my Linux experience so pleasurable. I don't mean to poke at the other distros yet somehow, I feel shortchanged (too molly coddled, perhaps) after each time that I have installed MDK or RH (now Fedora Core), Debian (sorry guys, nothing personal), and even FreeBSD4.8 (although, I confess I didn't give *BSD a fair chance). Especially with RH and MDK the branding of the distribution takes over the applications and one is reminded that one is working with MDK or RH. I like my Linux naked!!!
I am amazed at how stable the distribution is. I like that all configuration files can be tweaked. I like that things "just work" and it is this which reflects the Linux that I have come to know and to love.
Although it might happen, I really can't see myself changing distros at any time soon.

Patrick and team: thanks guys!!!
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:39 AM   #13
 
Registered: Dec 1969
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy installation; stable system; helps you to learn Linux
Cons: no one came to my house and "did it all for me" ;)


This was the third Linux distro that I tried. The first one was too bloated, had too much dependency upon GUI's for my taste, and used the RPM system which usually failed an upgrade because of dependency problems. The second one wasn't bloated, but getting new packages was sometimes a pain, because it has many developers working on packages and their use of different libraries, etc. sometimes conflicted. So...

I tried Slackware because the more I used LinuxQuestions, a saw a trend developing. Most or the Mods use Slack, and most of the posts I read that had results that fixed the problem were by Slackers.

Slack 9.1 has everything you could want in 2 iso files. Most of the packages are quite up-to-date. I installed everything, and my system is still quite fast. Every app I've tried that was installed is stable.

I originally used KDE as my window manager, but switched to Fluxbox for a faster, leaner wm. Flux can be customized very easily by editing the file ~/.fluxbox/menu and there are many styles for the person who doesn't want to create his own.

Slackware uses a package management system called pkgtool that "just works." Read more by issuing "man pkgtool" without the quotes. I've found that the easiest way to update a package is using the tool upgradepkg and I have never had a dependency problem when doing so. If you want to install a new package, look for a Slackpack - it will have .tgz as it's file extension, and you can find quite a few at www.linuxpackages.net and other places.

I also use the package checkinstall, which allows you to compile from source, and instead of issuing make install as the last command, you do checkinstall and it will convert the package to a Slackpack and store it on your comp. That way you can easily remove it later by doing removepkg <packagename>.

Slackware also provides some very good documentation. On their website at http://www.slackware.com/book/ you can find The Official Guide To Slackware Linux. With this one single document, one can install Slack, recompile the kernel, and get just about anything running. There is enough information in that doc to move one from newbie to guru.

I also like the Slack community. I've found that Slackers at LQ have learned much about *nix, and are generally very willing to help.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 09:43 PM   #14
LinuxBlackBox
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Slackware 9
Posts: 243

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $7.00 | Rating: 8

Pros: Reliable, Attractive looking, Fast
Cons: Difficult to install, No package manager


Slackware is my favourite of all of the distros, because it gives me the most freedom with being able to control my system and customize it anyway I want. Slackware has been very depandable for me, and I have not had any problems with hardware or upgrades. However, installing Slack and setting up my disk archetecture took a long time. Also, I do miss being able to use apt-get to download new packages. Programs for Slackware must be compiled from the source. I would reccomend this to any person who has had some experience with linux and is ready to move on to a more challenging distro, but total newbies may find it too confusing at first.
 
Old 04-01-2004, 05:43 AM   #15
garbagedisposal
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Posts: 8

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $39.00 | Rating: 9

Pros: Zippy. Stable. Easy to maintain. Knowledgeable userbase.
Cons: Undeserved reputation of difficulty. Inadequate Package management.


Achieves it's stated aim of simplicity & speed by implementing BSD style init system. This is a mature distro with a long heritage and a NO LONGER deserved reputation for being only for Techo's.

After trialling apporx 18 other distro's I can say what a pleasure it is to use Slackware. The installer is simple & well thought out, requiring only minimal Linux knowledge. The installed OS is quite zippy. Maintaining slackware is easy becuase of it's simple design & knowledgeable users. I am no longer afraid of editing config files.

The default package tool is OK but makes NO attempt to resolve dependancies. Swaret should be included dammit! as it works well for the most part.

Pro's :
Zippy.
Stable.
Easy to maintain.
Mature.
Kernel 2.6 ready. (ALSA etc)
Knowledgeable userbase.
3rd party packages consistant quality.

Con's :
Undeserved reputation of difficulty.
Inadequate Package management.
 
Old 04-03-2004, 07:49 AM   #16
dushkinup
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: Computer I : Slackware 9.1 ; Computer II : Windows XP
Posts: 144

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, no lack of packages, compiles just about anything, 2.6 ready
Cons: not so easy



Thank you slackware!

Slackware is simply the best distro. It's fast, simple and popular.
Try it.
 
Old 04-06-2004, 01:48 PM   #17
Kaniaz
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Slackware Linux 9.1
Posts: 6

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy To Use, No "Fluff"
Cons: None that I can think of...


I tried every distro I could find- Redhat, Mandrake, you name it. I hadn't tried Slackware because I was a Linux newbie (moving from Windows), and apparently Slackware is "hard to use" for newbies.

However, I tried it on a whim and after a painless install, which pretty much consisted of just reading the instructions and using some common sense, and messing about with configuration files a bit (something that was also very easy), I booted it up. I was amazed at the speed and simplicity! It was everything I wanted Linux to do; and it did it.

It was also a great learning experience for me; I learnt everything I now know about Linux from Slackware- it encouraged me to edit configuration files directly, mess with /etc/fstab or whatever, without the aid of configuration tools to do most of the work for me.

I still use it now and it's stability and speed is perfect for me. I reccomend it to anybody, even newbies who don't mind spending a few days learning how to do new things, and don't expect some kind of install that does pratically everything for you.
 
Old 04-08-2004, 01:08 PM   #18
loadedmind
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Red Hat/CentOS
Posts: 232

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, reliable, fast and fully customizeable
Cons: Not the ideal choice for the linux-inexperienced.


Obviously, from the rating, this is my preferred distribution. Words can't effectively do this distribution justice. Slackware is one of those distro's that will NOT release an updated version unless it has stood the "trial-by-fire" tests time and time again. Hence its rock-solid integrity. The distro does not ship with an automatic package updater, but isn't necessarily needed for some. I use something called "swaret" (http://swaret.xbone.be/) for this task which works quite nicely. I believe what really sets Slackware apart from the other distributions is its tried and true, ever-reliable ability to tweak/customize and configure. It's extremely package-friendly, not to mention its package handler being quite capable of adding/removing existing packages. I don't consider this a negative, but, because of its interface and its reliance on the user to configure it, Slackware is unforgiving to the linux neophyte. However, one way to look at plunging into new things is that you learn more if you're patient enough to endure the learning curve. This is how I learned Slackware. Debian is a lot like Slackware in this regard. If you have any questions getting started or Slack-related issues in general, feel free to fire off an email my direction - tau_zeppelin@yahoo.com.
 
Old 04-11-2004, 04:26 AM   #19
American Psycho
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: LFS
Posts: 88

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: stable, fairly fast, good selection of packages but not bulky
Cons: not THE fastest, not for newbies


This is without a doubt my favorite distribution. It is stable, fast, has good packages to chose from, and helps the user transition from redhat's graphical sea to learning how to use a command prompt (or it did for me anyways). Perfect as a first or second linux distro and definitely one to keep!
 
Old 04-16-2004, 05:18 AM   #20
bm1
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Distribution: freeBSD, slack
Posts: 156

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


slackware teaches you. At the time you are trouble shooting something it doesnt seem that way. i have just installed slack 9.1 on my good computer(no more windows) with dual monitors and an ati card. It took me 6 days troubleshooting. and i cant help smiling when im on my computer.
slackware is satisfying
 
Old 04-22-2004, 01:22 AM   #21
kam1su2
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Slackware 9.1
Posts: 5

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Packed with everything you need to get started.
Cons: Not for the faint at heart. O_o


Very nice soild distro. If you dont mind getting your hands dirty this is one of the best way to get under the hood and learn what linus really is about. Not for the timid or the average user who just wants to put the cd in and let everything go on its on. But even with its manual configuration needs, alot of it is still done automatically. Love this distro, i have used it at different times during its evolution along with others and i can't help but to keep coming back for me :-_
 
Old 05-10-2004, 05:23 PM   #22
bartgymnast
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: slack 7.1 till latest and -current, LFS
Posts: 268

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: fast, reliable, stable
Cons: not easy for newbs


I use slack since 7.1

and it always works good, fast.
I would never switch.
it is configurable.
never failed me.
 
Old 05-11-2004, 02:06 AM   #23
Nz_Boy_2004
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 258

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $5.00 | Rating: 10

Pros: Theres to many over my old distros.
Cons: NONE


This is the best distro hands down i love it so far, get slack over any other distro u look at none compare.
 
Old 05-13-2004, 11:40 PM   #24
xanas3712
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Slackware/Mandrake/Debian (sarge)
Posts: 266

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Stable, Good learning distro for linux, swaret is a great upgrade tool
Cons: Requires one not to be afraid of the console


I'm giving slackware a 9 for some problems I had with swaret earlier on. But once I got used to it and figured out things it's a great tool. I think there is a bit of a learning curve to slackware but if you are someone that is fairly reasonable and willing to go out and try and ask questions when you fail in this forum you will be successful at running this system. Now, if you are someone who can't fix basic problems in windows this may not be for you, but if you are tech savvy at all and know how to install drivers, windows, format your system, maintain it and all then you'll do great with slackware.

Slackware is stable and it is fast. It also gives no problems at all when you go to upgrade your kernel version should you desire to. It has support for the latest software and has one of the best package management systems along with the tool swaret and the great website at linuxpackages.net

I do think there could be a few more GUI tools released and some things made easier for slackware but much are not so much the fault of the distrubtion itself but of others. Thing is there are easy tools to find (like alien and rpm2tgz) that will convert software designed to be installed on other linux versions and usually make them relatively painless to install. It could be easier (why I give it a 9) but it's problems are not unresolvable.. and when you are resolving them you will learn something. Which is always a good thing no?

I highly recommend slackware and would say that linux newbies should first do this. Download and install mandrake. If you can get it up and running and understand the partitioning wizards and get everything the way you want it, format again.. and install slackware. Really the only hard part of slackware is the first installation wizard. Once you get past that you are good to go.

 
Old 05-17-2004, 04:28 AM   #25
Theylan
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Slackware mostly, Gentoo is going on the games machine, Fedora on the TV websurfer
Posts: 17

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


What can I say that hasn't already been said? It's great for learning, it's great for running applications - heck, it's just great full stop.

One thing I will say though, is that, unless you are prepared to do a lot of reading before hand, setting it up could be a bit daunting for a first time user. I started on redhat 9 (and, more recently, Fedora) and I still have these on a couple of my comps (though I think that they will be replaced soon with Slack) and these allowed me to learn the (very) basics of Linux, whilst still giving me a working systemat the end, no problems. I think I would suggest that to the majority of first time users (i.e. people coming over from windoze) to ease thenselves into it, Slack might be a bit of a shock :). This is not a bad reflection on Slack in any way shape or form though, indeed setting up your Slack box will be a pleasureable experience, as long as you have the basics under your belt from either reading (having another comp with internet access helps enormously) of from a bulkier, easier dist (i.e. Fedora, Mandrake, SUSE).

Have fun, and keep Slacking!
 
Old 05-17-2004, 02:45 PM   #26
MrPhreak
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2004.3
Posts: 1

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Simply the best
Cons: none


Like everyone else has said, Slack is stable, fast and doesn't come with all kinds of stuff you don't need. It takes a little getting used to editing config files but in the long run is much better than using GUIs like in other distros. I have tried other distros but since I installed Slack about a year ago I don't think I will try anything else. I love it.
 
Old 05-20-2004, 03:37 AM   #27
kittani
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 20

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Requires a GED in stability resolution.
Cons: Requires a PHD in package management


Why a 9 and not a 10? 10 would imply the absolute best distro that every newbie in the world could pick up and run... it would imply the death of Micro$oft and all other OS manufacturers. Someday... someday... but not today. Slackware needs just a few more things... and I will list them off here.

A) Annaconda-style installer....anyone want to get porting?

B) though 2.6 ready it says nothing anywhere about actually HOW-TO do this... hint hint hint.

C) A control applet that allows starting and stopping of services and configuration of firewalls and other daemons. Make admin easy cause unix administrators...well... we're lazy

D) PACKAGE DEPENDENCY CHECKS!!! This is the second biggest issue with Slack, next to the archaic installer (Which has not changed since I started using it in the 3.x series.)

Ok... I KNOW NOONE LIKES TO PROGRAM SYSTEM INSTALLERS... but guys... c'mon... If I was a programmer I'd be jumping at the chance to port Annaconda over or make a new one. This is the biggest problem with this distro for newbies and could take Slackware beyond anything imaginable.

So... That's what it needs... here's what it delivers...

A) Stability - Nuff said... it don;t go down... no matter how bad it flips out when you get errors in X or something... the core stays running. Awesome, Rock-solid, 10 out of 10 in stability.

B) 4 CD's, 2 bins, 2 srcs +, very very cool.

C) Comprehensive package selections. Everything is GPL or otherwise free. All of it is compatible... (except the usual KDE and Gnome bugs) And there isn;t alot of distro fodder that some crimson capped (I know that's bad) distros throw in to make it 3 disks. All of what you need, none of what you don't.

D) Tagfiles... Though it doesn't Solve package deps I did notice that after i made a custom tagfile and ran the setup with it... the install was as fast as if i had selected the everything tagfile" tres chiq and i can just pop in the disk... run through the partitions... and bam.... come back to an almost finished install. 10-15 minutes tops for the whole thing... Red hat still takes me an hour to do a custom install on.

E) last but not least... I have a brand spanking new sound card... Audigy 2 ZS... ALSA saw it right off the bat... and i was listening to MP3's immediately. Granted i had to go into the terminal to have ALSA detect the card and adjust the mixer settings (Someone please make a modified install script that does this by default or with a single command) Not only did Red Hat have problems with this card... but it also had MP3 playback off by default. Lame...

All in all I would reccommend this distro to anyone that wishes to learn alot about the OS... almost if not more than you learned about running DOS and win 3.x in the old days. It's not for the click and point generation of computer users yet... (If you don;t know what Q-basic is at least then you might want to consider Linspire or even a Knoppic CD. Give it a shot of your're tired of the commercial distros jacking up the price on free software because of one new prog that they are actually charging you the 13000 dollars for. I won't say what ones those are but that's what it amounts to.

Extras I would Like to see....

OpenMosix support built in (That's for all you people with 6 or 7 clunkers that want to seriously juice up your main heheheh)

bareacpi.i and bare.i kernels pre-compiled under the 2.6.6 source. (at least downloadable packages with the mods and such already set-up) For some reason when I try to compile the kernel i get "No rule to make BzImage" Wierd since I have everything else up-to-date and can still compile 2.4.x kernels in my sleep.

And Finally.... a descent collection of KDE themes. I'd love to see some of the ones that Knoppix includes in it's distro in Slack. By default you only get 4 i think... and none of them are that great.

9 out of 10... cause a 10 is really saying more than ANY linux distro can offer... Slackware is king in my book... even if I do screw it up every 3 or 4 days...

I am a prime example of the saying... "He who plays around too long in root eventually kills tree."

P.S. DON'T ever issue the commands as root... under /

rm -rf *
chmod -R 666 *

Both of these commands will force you to dig out your re-install disks... ort at the very least the first one will.

tee-hee....ooops...F$%&
 
Old 05-25-2004, 12:02 AM   #28
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert. I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Thanx to people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 06-05-2004, 12:24 PM   #29
OC_eobard
 
Registered: May 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.2, Ubuntu 6.10
Posts: 94

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Solid releas, not full of holes
Cons: none (see below)


This is a very good distro.

I've used Mandrake 9.2 for about 6 months and in that time I didn't learn how to become proficient with Linux, I've just learned how to compensate for it's flaws (and there are many flaws in Mandrake). Slackware's only flaw (that I can see) is that it expects the user to actually apply themselves instead of spoon-feeding them results like Mandrake (tries to) do. People say Slackware is much harder than something like Mandrake but I prefer to actually learn how to get the results I want instead of having them handed to me.

Slackware remains consistent with older versions of itself so as not to trip up users. I've tinkered with Linux a bit over the years and now that I'm seriously getting into learning my way around it I'm using an 8 year old book for Slackware 3.0 to teach myself and I'm amazed that while things have gotten better with Slackware they still are similar. It gets better, not different.
 
Old 06-15-2004, 01:04 AM   #30
frob23
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Distribution: Ubuntu, FreeBSD, NetBSD
Posts: 1,449

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Smooth install and very clean
Cons: Some people might not like Text installs even easy ones


I am a FreeBSD user... but in the long long ago... the before-time... I ran Slackware.

I had a spare computer and it seemed to be crying out for something different. And, to be honest, I missed Slackware. I downloaded the isos for 9.1 and installed them. It went just like I remembered it. And it is hard to dislike such a streamlined install. Even though it expect you to know what needs to be done.

It is now running. Personally, I like that it defaults to INIT3 and not 5 (GUI). That is what I prefer. But it isn't hard to change that (inittab) if you want the graphical startup.

This distro probably isn't for someone moving right from windows to the Linux world without assistence. But it is still very nice and I would recommend it to anyone.
 
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