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Slackware 12.1
Reviews Views Date of last review
30 107288 12-05-2008
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $49.95 9.9
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Description: Well folks, it's that time to announce a new stable Slackware release again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.1! Since we've moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware 12.1 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 12.0) and is a must-have upgrade for any Slackware user.
Keywords: slackware linux easy expert learn friendly newbie best stable performance


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Old 05-26-2008, 02:23 AM   #1
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,223

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $49.95 | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure Linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.



Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn Linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert.
I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other Linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Big thanx to Patrick Volkerding and all other people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 06-26-2008, 12:45 PM   #2
BobNutfield
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Distribution: Fedora , Ubuntu, Slackware-Current
Posts: 1,477

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Fast, stable, configuable, and true to the Linux fundamentals
Cons: No hand holding for the beginner


I first tried Slackware with 10.1 and did not return until this year with 12.1. I am glad I did return as it is better than I remembered. I installed on a Toshiba A210 laptop with a dual boot using grub (dual with another Linux, not Windows.) Slackware is not known to be laptop friendly, but with some help from the forum, I was able to configure virtually ALL of the hardware to work (even one that would NOT work with the original Vista installation.) I am not a Linux expert nor am I in the IT business. Just an everyday desktop user who loves Linux and I was able set everything up quite easily. I use quite a few distros on other laptops and a desktop, and Slack 12.1 is BY FAR the fastest and most stable. I have settled in to using it as my main system and I intend to continue with Slack from here on.
 
Old 06-26-2008, 02:50 PM   #3
mostlyharmless
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 (multilib) with kernel 3.13.2
Posts: 1,467

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Slackware doing what slackware does
Cons: see above


There's a reason why Slackware has longevity. Don't be put off by the ncurses install and the few manual steps needed to install Slack 12.1. Some things, like partitioning your disk, are probably better done manually anyway. If you have unusual or old hardware, Slackware is probably the easiest distro to customize. The latest version brings the kernel up to 2.6.24.5, adds additional support for LVM, RAID and LUKS and works as solidly as any previous slack. No extras you don't need, fabulous support for anything you do need. No dependency handling means no dependency heck - but it's hard to appreciate until you've tried it and the alternatives.
 
Old 06-26-2008, 03:00 PM   #4
slackass
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Distribution: Slack64-C ML
Posts: 876

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable - Fast - Never Breakes - No Udate Nanny
Cons: Wont cut my grass


Quite simply put, this system is the best there is after you get past a slight learning curve. Theres no auto-updater popping up from the tool bar saying Do ya feel lucky ?. I can't count the number of times I've had the updater on other OS's hose my system. No more of that stuff for me now. I'll just stick with Slack and don't worry about updater nannies anymore.
 
Old 06-26-2008, 11:54 PM   #5
phantom_cyph
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: WinXP for designing, Linux for life.
Posts: 2,329

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Its....Slackware. That should say everything.
Cons: I wish it came with Grub instead of Lilo...


I liked that the audio worked right out of the box this time. That was a minor disappointment with 12.0. Definitely a Slacker now, tried BSD and Solaris as well as Debian again, had an empty feeling. :D

Other note...I like that you have time to customize Slackware before another version comes out...*#%ub^un!tu#$^
 
Old 06-27-2008, 01:00 AM   #6
TL_CLD
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Posts: 342

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $49.95 | Rating: 9

Pros: Stable, fast, mature, simple.
Cons: Not THE most newbie-friendly distro.


There's very little, if anything, that Slackware does wrong. It excels in most areas, specifically in regards to stability, simplicity and speed.

There's one thing though I feel would benefit Slackware: A "I'm a complete NEWBIE" install setting. When you select that option during install, Slackware should just install itself using the entire harddrive (with proper warning of course). No manual partitioning, no package selection, no asking anything but the most basic questions. Perhaps even automatically setting up X and boot directly into KDE.

I think a lot of new users could be tempted to try the oldest surviving Linux distro, if they didn't feel they had to overcome all sorts of "impossible" obstacles, just to get it up and running.

Besides that minor thing, Slackware is by far my favorite distro. I use it in my company (currently 8 desktops and 13 servers) and I use it at home. It just works.
 
Old 06-27-2008, 07:26 AM   #7
brianL
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 6,690

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Everything
Cons: Nothing


Contrary to rumour and myth, Slack is a suitable distro for newbies, provided they are willing to engage their brains a little now and then. My first experience with GNU/Linux was installing Slackware 10 in 2005, I was a relative newbie to computers in general then, but I had little difficulty. Since then I've used 11, 12.0, and now 12.1, and each issue has been easier to install and configure. Personally, I just find Slackware a lot more interesting than other distros I've tried. I always do a full install, since I never know what aspect or field of computing I will get interested in next. No hunting through Package Managers for bits and pieces. I would recommend Slackware 12.1 to anyone, whatever their level of experience or needs.
 
Old 06-27-2008, 08:02 AM   #8
apex.predator
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: Slackware 12.1
Posts: 22

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stability, intuitiveness
Cons: may intimidate at first try, seems plain until you gain experience with it


Slackware 12.0 was the first version I ran, and I decided to go with a fresh installation of 12.1. I have been glad. No problems with installation, and I have been happily adding packages in the last few days. Slackware simply runs better than any other Linux I have tried.

Slackware certainly isn't for everyone. I have found, however, a certain amount of DIY to be necessary with every distribution I have used, regardless of how trouble-free and clean they seemed to me initially.

Slackware's DIY is on the front end; once done, it will run trouble free until you remove it. The debian-based and rpm distributions I have used were slick on the front end, but gave problems later.

When it comes to fixing debian-based or rpm-based distributions, I simply don't have the motivation; I do come back to Slackware.

Edit: I had a subscription with v 11.0 and v. 12.0, but downloaded 12.1.
 
Old 06-27-2008, 08:49 AM   #9
Cuetzpallin
 
Registered: Feb 2008
Distribution: Slackware since 3.4 and love it!!!
Posts: 162

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, fast, strong, secure, adaptable, expandable, simple, Unix like, etc, etc, etc....
Cons: Need to read a lot, before be satisfied (just a joke) :P


My first linux distro was slackware 3 or 4 (don't remember) on a magazine in 1997.
After read the magazine and the README on the disk i try to make my first installation of linux, I remember it wasn't easy and it's that I like from this, it was a goal to comply.
After few hours reading and trying and falling, finally I achieved my objective with this distribution, making work my first graphic environment, myself.

I loved since the first moment.

Currently is my desktop environment and I still working with it, upgrading and reinstalling as needed. I recommend it also for newbees. Just take a look.
 
Old 06-27-2008, 11:52 AM   #10
onebuck
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 10,882

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: As close to UNIX as you can get! Sorry BSD users. :)
Cons:


Slackware 12.1 is great! The oldest and Stable GNU/Linux. I would recommend that everyone read the provided documentation; Slackware-HOWTO, ANNOUNCE.12_1,RELEASE_NOTES, CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT, UPGRADE.TXT to name a few. All the .txt files are on your install cd/dvd. Most people run into 'Gotchas' because they fail to read the documentation to get information that is relative to their needs.

My review would not be objective since I have used Slackware since the early days. We used it in our laboratory for instrumentation pc platforms, it was a lot cheaper than a SYSV license for a pc platform.

I really enjoy the use of Slackware on my bench machines along with my desktop machines.

As for the myth that Slackware installation on a laptop is hard. No way! It will and does install without too much effort on a Laptop. I've got it installed on several Laptops like Gateway Laptops and several IBM ThinkPads that are used as controllers. READING and some research will get you an install of Slackware to just about any machine of choice.
 
Old 06-27-2008, 02:54 PM   #11
adriv
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 658

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: fast, stable and secure
Cons: fast, stable and secure


The pros are the usual suspects (on Slackware), the cons too, in a way. Because a properly set-up Slack box hardly needs any looking after and just runs and runs without any trouble, you could say Slackware is actually quite boring.
Just kidding. ;)
 
Old 06-28-2008, 02:04 AM   #12
fastestOS
 
Registered: Jun 2008
Distribution: Slackware forever
Posts: 29

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: blazing fast, ROCK SOLID, customizable, 100% pure Linux OS, simple, secure
Cons: nothing so far


Even if you're a newbie, I'd suggest you give it a shot. What Slackware actually does is, it will take you to the level you can't imagine you can reach.

Believe it or not, Slackware is my first Linux OS even though I was a complete newbie that time. I have read several articles that says it's hard to install blah blah but that didn't hold me back. Many newbies would probably think it's hard but the truth to the matter is it's not!

I think the main source of their problem is that they didn't read the documentation until they got frustrated.

The RULE is simple: read the doc, follow the instructions, and USE your common sense. :)

ENJOY slackware!
 
Old 06-28-2008, 09:12 PM   #13
manwichmakesameal
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 800

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Simplicity, stability, easy of use
Cons: None


I've been using Slack since 10, and haven't looked back. I've tried other distros, but they just don't have the certain "something". The package management system is soooo easy, yet extremely powerful. No dependency hell. Solid as a rock. Just got a co-worker using Slack as well. Hopefully he'll be writing one of these soon. I think that Slackware is the perfect distro for Linux newcomers because it makes you so how everything actually works under all the point and click fluff. I've learned much more from using Slack than any other distro (except LFS).
 
Old 07-03-2008, 06:15 PM   #14
penfoldTHIS
 
Registered: Mar 2006
Distribution: Slackware 12.1
Posts: 7

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: It does what you tell it too. And if you ask it correctly, you never have to ask for it again.
Cons: Doesn't fetch beer?


I believe I started on Slackware 7(2000 or so). It is the perfect distro for learning linux. Once you start using it and learn the advantages of running a system without complication, you never want to leave it. Slackware has been running on my servers constantly since the day I discovered it and wouldn't want it any other way. I have tried and still play with many different distros(Some good, some bad) and I always come back to Slackware. It works, it's solid, and it's Slack!
 
Old 07-03-2008, 06:34 PM   #15
C-Sniper
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 507

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, great community, fast, good learning tool
Cons: Decent learning curve when you first start


I have been using Slackware since 11.0 and i must say that even though the learning curve was a bit steep at first, i learned so much about how my systems works. The online community is great and helpful if you are willing to learn and read the manual a bit. I think though that the main pro of Slackware is the fact that it is as stable as hell. You have to TRY to break it to do so, and most the time it will end up being a UI (user to interface, aka YOU) error that screws it up.

I would not recommend this distro to people who just want an OS, but i would recommend this to anyone who wants to learn about Linux and have a chance to see how everything works together and what a well rounded, stable OS looks like.
 
Old 07-04-2008, 02:39 AM   #16
H_TeXMeX_H
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: fast, stable, secure, simple, does not get in your way
Cons: people think it's hard to use, but that's cuz they don't RTFM



I think it's currently the best distro in existence. If you think all distros suck, then you haven't tried Slackware. Do try it before you go back to Window$, and do RTFM before you begin or you are much more likely to fail and say Slackware sucks like many reviewers have done, and will probably continue to do.

To date there hasn't been a single Slackware release that has not met my expectations or surpassed them. How does Pat V. do it ? I dunno, guess that's why they call him "the man" :)
 
Old 07-04-2008, 03:11 AM   #17
bgeddy
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Distribution: slackware64 13.37 and -current, Dragonfly BSD
Posts: 1,810

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, fast, great community,unobtrusive,easily configurable
Cons: None


Yet again a superb release from the Slackware team. Following the standards by keeping things simple and not trying to automate procedures i.e. it never gets in the way.

The best distro by far...
 
Old 07-05-2008, 12:09 PM   #18
hartz4ever
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Distribution: Slackware64 13.0
Posts: 5

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: short installation time, rock solid, never locks you out
Cons: very addictive (a day without slack and i'm flat on my back)


Why do people blather on Slackware being not suitable for newbies? If newbies had to install MX HindOS manually, wouldn't they start to cry? I guess so. I started my Linux live with a SuSE 6.x in 1999 and fumbled nearly a week to get all things running. Since 2001 i'm a happy Slackware user without configuration files overwritten by obscure tools or upgrades leaving you alone with rip and eip messages from the kernel. A big pro is the usage of vanilla kernels and packages (patches only if necessary), thus making it easy to compile additional software. If all distros were as valuable as Slackware, we wouldn't have had discussions about GNU/Linux being an OS for gurus only.
 
Old 07-21-2008, 10:40 AM   #19
exkor5000
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 51

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: super stable, very simple, great distro for beginners
Cons: none in my opinion


Best distro for beginners who WANT to learn how to work with linux systems (leave Fedora for the yuppies and wannabes :))
 
Old 08-11-2008, 01:07 AM   #20
maravi
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 13

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Functionality, stability... it's simply awesome.
Cons: ... it doesn't make me breakfast?


Slackware can be very intimidating for a Linux newbie, sure. I'd been bouncing around between distros for a couple years (Mandrake/iva, Fedora, openSUSE, Ubuntu, you name it), and always wasn't quite there. I love Linux, and each distro had a unique flavor... but nothing really grabbed me yet.

I was a little intimidated by Slackware, but it was completely worth it. This is my first Slackware, and while I'd highly recommend having a book/laptop nearby for some advice along the way.

Take your time, read a lot, and get ready for the smoothest, sweetest OS you've ever had the joy of installing.

Viva la Slack!
 
Old 08-12-2008, 12:43 PM   #21
charlie0313
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Distribution: Slackware 12.0, Ubuntu 8.04
Posts: 47

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Rock solid, great for learning
Cons: Not as lean as I would like


Slackware was the first distro that I stuck with. I used it to learn Linux and set up a web server, FTP, and SSH. The only times that machine has ever been off has been power outages. It has never crashed, never even hic uped. It just keeps going. The only complaint I can think of is during the installation there are too many packages to weed through. I like to have a very lean system so it takes a while.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 06:22 PM   #22
maravi
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 13

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Almost everything (stability, what you learn, performance).
Cons: Tough for newcomers, but not too much so.


I've bounced around various distributions since 2004, when I made my first foray into the Linux world. From Knoppix 3.5, to Mandrake/iva, to Ubuntu more recently, I'd covered most of the spectrum. Then I tried Slackware.

Simply put, it feels stronger and more complete than any other operating system I've used. It's lightning fast on my mid-to-low grade laptop, I feel completely in control of my machine, and I feel like I've learned a lot during my trials with it.

I was an intermediate user upon trying Slackware, and went through a good chunk of documentation early on, even with the installation. Slackware does have a learning curve that may turn off many Windows expatriates, and that's both a good and bad thing.

With Slackware, especially your first Slack, you need to be willing to a)ask for help, b)read help files/documentation/forums, and c)look for and try different ideas. Slackware won't hold your hand, and while that's scary at first, it ultimately makes you a stronger Linux user.

Slackware is a distribution that simply works. And works well. If you're willing to invest some time into learning the ins and outs, and learning how to do everything you want to do, you'll love Slackware.

As has been said many times, if you learn Red Hat, you can use Red Hat. However, if you learn Slackware, you can use Linux.
 
Old 08-16-2008, 01:49 PM   #23
ingerudo
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: not hacked software, very strightforward setup, not as hard as most say, pretty stable and one of the best performances on linux
Cons: not commercial third party support (there are a lot of rpm and deb software out there but too few official tgz packages)


Is very good for the people who likes knowing exactly what is their OS running, the software which comes with this distro is not altered so this distribution can be considered as "source compatible" as I like to call it, meaning almos any source code you try to compile will run without breaking your linux setup.

The Slackware setup might be scary for some people because it is text based but most of the time you will find yourself just hitting enter instead of configuring something.
 
Old 08-24-2008, 10:26 AM   #24
soppy
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Distribution: Arch Linux
Posts: 165

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, reliable, easy to use
Cons: Can't use it to pick up chics


I started using Slack 12 when it came out and really hated it. Mostly because I was new to Linux and knew nothing about anything. I tried other distros and later found myself back at Slackware 12. Since I had some experience then, it was like love at first site for me. I have used Slack ever since (not long) and have no intentions of EVER switching my distro. The upgrade from 12 to 12.1 was absolutely painless and easier than the actual install. Anyone on any other Linux is definitely missing out.
And the myth about Slack not being good on laptops is not true. I'm on one right now (kinda old) and when it had Windows, I called it the craptop because of the speed. With Slackware, it regained its status of laptop.
 
Old 09-08-2008, 06:31 PM   #25
mbvo
 
Registered: May 2006
Distribution: slackware-current
Posts: 220

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Very fully featured yet light distro. Easy to learn linux with.
Cons: no package manager


I've been using linux off and on for about 2 years now. The first thing I noticed after installing and running for the first time(other than the fact that by default it has a text login), Is how fast it ran, and yet how complete it was. I've only installed upgrades sofar(ff2 to ff3 and kde3 to kde4) except for ndiswrapper and nvidia drivers. It comes with everything I need sofar. I've used Ubuntu, tried DSL and OpenSuSE. But I think I've finaly found a distro I can leave windows xp for(except for gaming).

I would recomend this distro to anyone who is looking to learn the ins and outs of linux, or anyone who wants a distro that will run on old hardware and not have to be stripped down to do so.

My PC:

1 Ghz AMD Duron
398 Mb RAM pc100/133
NVidia RIVA TNT2/TNT2 Pro
hdb1(40gb) windows xp pro
hdc1(23gb) slackware 12.1
hdc4(11gb) ubuntu 7.04
hdc5(4gb) DSL 4.2.5
hdc6(2gb) swap
hdd1(40gb) data
 
Old 09-15-2008, 05:01 PM   #26
merciful
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Distribution: Slackware 13.1 / GSB / Compiz | Slackware 12.1 KDE
Posts: 15

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, powerfull
Cons: None


Hmm, laptop install a problem? I'm running 12.1 on a Acer 5315 without any problem and more stable than Vista.

After my Atari years (XL, ST(fm), STe, TT, Falcon), only Slackware (started with 10.2) made me decide that it was time that the Falcon should retire. Until then I used the Falcon for the main work an some kind of windows machine for the more heavy graphical work. The stuff 16 mhz Falcon could not do as fast.

So Slackware replaced my Atari's. No other distro made me do that. Should I say more?
 
Old 10-01-2008, 12:07 PM   #27
mighty-d
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Posts: 1

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: I only have two words to describe it... IT WORKS
Cons: I think PAM support is really a con of slack


As i said in the Pros Slackware WORKS, i have written a lot of reviews of the previous versions of slack (mainly 11.0 and 12.0) and i think it just gets better, kernel 2.6 by default on slack 12 was a great move, and 12.1 is as best (if not better) than its predecesor 12.0.

One of the best things about slackware is that you can move almost everything with it, i have several pentium pro 16 MB RAM boxes runing 11 and both my laptop and desktop running 12 and 12.1 respectively, i use it almost for everything i have a slackware box virtualizing a pfsense server, i also use slackware to serve my openldap and gosa applications over the network for remote auth (which is used by pfsense on proxy and for some debian boxes).

I would really like that slackware came with pam, since getting pam into a slackware box isnt painless, i dont know about you, but slackware just rocks, it has proven over the years to be a good choice for servers, as a vitualization host or desktop system and almost everything you can imagine.

If you have the time to learn some real Linux SKILLS get into slackware you wont regret it.
 
Old 11-05-2008, 12:58 PM   #28
barn63
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Distribution: Slackware 13.1
Posts: 150

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, stable, powerful.
Cons: Slight learning curve


I have used Slackware since version 10 and I always come back to it. I hear the latest greatest distro, give then a try and I always come back.

I like how with Slackware, if you want it to function a certain way, you MAKE it function that way. There is no wizards or fancy GUIs that "assist" you. You jump in and configure. Best way to learn Linux. I would recommend this to anyone.
 
Old 11-16-2008, 12:10 PM   #29
mipia
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Debian, Mint, Slackware
Posts: 457

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Near pristine binaries, fast, simple, clean, solid and stable. Greatest server setup I have ever worked with.
Cons: anything outside the official repo can be time consuming at first. Slackbuilds help quite a bit with this.


I'll keep this short. If you want to spend all your time installing, purging, updating software instead of being productive go with something using apt, yast, emerge, or some other package manager.
If you want to get your system set up, configured, and ready for production this is it. It took an afternoon to get everything I wanted but after that it's up to you what you want to get done.
It's a tinkerers delight, an unsurpassed learning tool, and a speedy and simple workstation just begging for developers to pound out some code.

And yes, it does handle dependencies, it's what some call an error message.
 
Old 12-05-2008, 06:11 PM   #30
deltabrown
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Best server platform available
Cons: Needs openLDAP, 64 bit version


All of the basics have already been covered so I won't repeat them, I'll just present a blanket agreement.

One of the best features of Slack is the startup scripts. It seems that all other Distros use the RH "spaghetti scripts" that are impossible to follow (If Slackware ever starts using those I will start my own Distro).

I have current systems running Slack 9.0 through 12.1. They only go down when the power fails and the UPS runs dry.

Have looked at other distros but nothing else is as easy to configure. Nothing else goes into production in this shop except on 64-bit hardware (forced to use RH).

Been a Slacker since 1996 and Slack_3.0 (kernel 1.3.something).
 




  



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