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MEPIS 7.0
Reviews Views Date of last review
20 119582 01-22-2009
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
95% of reviewers $34.98 9.1



Description: The final release of SimplyMEPIS 7.0 has not yet been finalized, but as is often the case, the test versions of SimplyMEPIS 7.0 have worked quite well. There are still a few bugs to work out before the final version is released, but I found the test versions to be quite usable for basic stuff like reading Email and browsing the Web or editing a text file. That is what I do 90% of the time anyway. This is one of the more stable test releases you are ever going to run across, so I expect the final release to be rock solid.

This release returns to the use of Debian repositories as the basis for the custom kernel and Debian provides the source code for the applications found in SimplyMEPIS.

I recommend this release, but I will write another review when the final comes out and provide a few more details.
Keywords: SimplyMEPIS, Live CD, desktop distro, easy


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Old 11-09-2007, 09:31 AM   #1
masinick
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: Debian, sidux, antiX, SimplyMEPIS, Kubuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, Xandros, Arch, and many others
Posts: 560

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy, stable, reasonably responsive
Cons: Sacrifices individual product selection



SimplyMEPIS is one of the top ten distributions viewed on DistroWatch. While that is not a definitive indication of anything, it does give an indication that SimplyMEPIS is of interest to a large number of people.

What impresses me especially about SimplyMEPIS, and I have been testing it dating back to 2003, is that regardless of the version, Alpha, Beta, or released version, the bulk of the functionality works. Rarely, even during testing, does Warren release a build that is full of issues. While the test versions may have flaws within some applications and while some interactions need to be worked out during testing cycles, SimplyMEPIS can be characterized as a well organized system, never shoddy, and always on the side of stability and conservatism. Occasionally Warren will provide bleeding edge features that his testers (and he) can experiment with, but these are never part of the core functionality, nor are they built in such a way that they would interfere with routine operation.

Because of these things, SimplyMEPIS, regardless of the version, is always worth having a copy nearby.

SimplyMEPIS 7.0 adds new features in KDE, updating to a much newer and more stable version. It also brings Open Office to a much more current version. At the time I am writing this, the final release has not been posted because final KDE and OpenOffice testing is still underway. However, the core system has been stable for some time and a spin-off version called AntiX (which uses lightweight applications and window manager on top of the MEPIS core and instead of the MEPIS desktop), has already been released as version 7, so you can see that the core components are as solid as a rock.

I recommend SimplyMEPIS for a stable desktop experience and AntiX if you need a somewhat lighter footprint and you don't mind giving up Open Office and a desktop environment.
 
Old 12-05-2007, 02:02 PM   #2
namida12
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Distribution: 64-bit Mepis
Posts: 129

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: RC2 is downloading as I post
Cons: Nvidia driver install for new cards


I have been running two systems side by side; one a 6.5.02 X2 AMD and the beta also a AMD X2 to compare a 64-bit final release with the 64-bit beta...

Returning SimplyMepis 7 to Debian from Ubunta dependency used in 6 and 6.5 releases was a good step in my opinion. The longer shelf life using the debian repositories will be good for the user and certainly for Warren the developer...

The change to a newer Kernel allows more wireless support, and with both Nvidia and ATI releasing newer Linux drivers this is good news for everyone.

I have never run the 32-bit systems, and now with AMD's Quads selling with both the 770 and 790 AM2+ motherboards under 300 USDlrs as a combo the 64-bit Linux systems will continue to be more important. SimplyMepis provides the user a choice of a 32 bit for the older single processor and a 64 bit version for the dual core and quad CPU users.

I like the newer release of gimp, and the 64-bit release of Opera is also on the horizon.

I have loaded RC1 on most brand name computers and it works out of the box, still a few things, with some laptops but I expect Warren will have a very dependable Linux Distribution available with a longer shelf life using the Debian repostores when SimplyMepis 7 is final...

I understand KDE 4 will be released mid January and SimplyMepis 7 has been designed to accommodate an upgrade to KDE 4 when it is ready...

JR
 
Old 12-05-2007, 06:32 PM   #3
masinick
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: Debian, sidux, antiX, SimplyMEPIS, Kubuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, Xandros, Arch, and many others
Posts: 560

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Works well, very stable
Cons: No final release announced, no regular schedule


I continue to have a very high regard for the SimplyMEPIS project. The pace of the effort has slowed down because Warren Woodford, the founder and principal developer, is doing consulting work to support himself because MEPIS revenues alone have been insufficient to do so. I am not surprised at this. Selling a distribution alone is not a good way to make money or to run a full time business. Selling subscriptions, having a support model, and having layers of applications to sell and support is a much more profitable way to go.

In spite of this, none of this is a negative reflection upon SimplyMEPIS. As long as you are looking for a stable, very usable desktop system and you are not particularly concerned with the schedule or the timing of it, I recommend going with this one. In fact, I have confirmation that you can seamlessly update from the Release Candidate to the final version. Therefore I recommend downloading SimplyMEPIS 7.0 Release Candidate 1, run it live from the CD to see if it works as well for you as it does for me, then if it does, install it. When the final release comes out, if there are any changes, just periodically perform updates as you should with any system. In this way, you can check out SimplyMEPIS with very low risk.

If you DO like it, I would recommend either subscribing to a SimplyMEPIS download service, purchasing a DVD or acquiring some merchandise from the MEPIS site. This helps to support Warren Woodford and decrease the amount of time he has to work as a consultant instead of working on new features for SimplyMEPIS. I bought the previous release, 6.5, plus I recently subscribed to the download service, so I practice what I recommend.

I just want to amend this posting to let you all know that the official version of SimplyMEPIS 7.0 was released just before Christmas. Since then, an update to a lighter version called antiX has also had an update. Like SimplyMEPIS, antiX is based on the 7.0 code and the antiX release has a 7.01 version now available. I want to further add that I have recently acquired another laptop - a Dell Latitude D600 and I can tell you that connecting SimplyMEPIS 7.0 - or AntiX 7.0, for that matter, to a wireless connection is about as easy as it gets. There is a MEPIS network utility that will let you add and/or configure additional interfaces or set up what you have. The first time you use a wireless device, if you use a WPA authentication scheme you provide the information to the utility and it remembers the information. If you are roaming and changes need to be made, these are easily done using the same tool. If using the same network, the system
Quote:
remembers
the settings. Very easy to automatically connect to a wireless network.

Finally, I want to note that I have followed my own advice. For the third time within a year, I have made a purchase from MEPIS to support their efforts. I bought the 6.5 DVD last year, then I bought a download service, and now that 7.0 is out, I bought another DVD to support the project. I encourage any of you that appreciate MEPIS to purchase either products or merchandise to support their efforts. Warren Woodford has recently had to accept consulting assignments to pay his bills. He commented that he can make more in a few weeks doing that than he can over a long period of time living off MEPIS, so the project is definitely a labor of love for him. But so that progress continues, please support not only Warren, but his small support team. I assure you that the price is modest and the product is first rate quality.
 
Old 12-15-2007, 08:08 AM   #4
Olle Gladso
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Distribution: Mandriva 2009.1 powerpack
Posts: 22

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $19.95 | Rating: 10

Pros: Very stable.
Cons: None


I am posting a reply simply to chime in and say that if you enjoy Mepis, please consider buying a download subscription or support Mepis otherwise.
This would give Warren more of an incentive and time to work on the distribution.
 
Old 01-22-2008, 12:10 PM   #5
newbiesforever
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Distribution: Distro-homeless. Lost.
Posts: 1,886

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0

Pros: Runs my wireless network stably
Cons: network difficult to set up; doesn't read my Windows partition easily; a little buggy


This version of MEPIS works decently, as MEPIS has since at least version 3.4, but I'm not sure it's a big improvement. Starting with MEPIS 6.5 and continuing through this version, the designers overcomplicated what had been an *extremely* easy network setup in MEPIS 3.4. There, I could set up my wireless network in five minutes. In 7 (and 6, for that matter), I could never get all the settings correct in the MEPIS Network Assistant.
I finally activated my network only by reinstalling 3.4 on another partition, setting up the network there, and copying all the settings over to the partition with MEPIS 7. (This consisted of finding all the files in 3.4 which could possibly contain network settings, copying them over without any certainty which ones were important (I am a newbie), and hoping they worked.

MEPIS has always had an annoying level of difficulty in reading the contents of my Windows partition, even after I reformatted it to FAT32 explicitly to avoid any Linux NTFS support problems. If I try to read the Windows partition in Konqueror, it claims there are no files and folders there. Kwikdisk is much more reliable in accessing it.
I don't understand the problem, and am not sure it's indigenous to MEPIS because at least one other distro (FC5) had trouble finding any files on the Windows partition. (Others distros, including PCLinuxOS and Knoppix, don't.) But whatever it is, the designers have not improved on it.

Finally, I have seen some odd behaviors which seem to be bugs. I have the taskbar set to auto-hide, and I notice that when I make it reappear by bringing the cursor down to it, some of the items on the right end of the taskbar (especially Kwikdisk and Kpowersave) are invisible. They immediately reappear when I mouse over them.
A more recent and more serious problem is that Firefox tends to freeze up for minutes at a time. I have no idea whether it's a MEPIS problem or a Firefox problem; only that that never happened in MEPIS 3.4.
 
Old 01-30-2008, 02:24 AM   #6
Alex2008
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


I was pleased with MEPIS's hardware detection and configuration. My display was correctly configured to use the desired 1280x800 resolution, a welcome sound greeted my first login, the volume controls worked on my keyboard, and my wireless Ethernet adapter was ready for the input of my Wi-Fi Protected Access passkey.

------------------------------
Accessories
 
Old 01-30-2008, 07:17 PM   #7
Brianfast
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Debian etch
Posts: 39

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Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: $50.00 | Rating: 1

Pros: Uses KDE enviorment, nice art
Cons: No commercial driver support, no official forums


MEPIS 7 is a terrible distribution. Out of the box nothing auto detects like most modern distribution and installing takes hours. Synaptic package manager runs slower then usual in MEPIS. It is extremely difficult to install commercial drivers. No COMPIZ, NO WIFI DETECTION, no graphics accelleration. The people who run the de facto support forums are morons and would not be successful running any other type of forum, and are only successful running mepis because they are the only mepis forum. The community is made up of jerks and liars.
 
Old 02-04-2008, 02:10 PM   #8
acesabe
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 5

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Pros:
Cons:


Quote:
MEPIS 7 is a terrible distribution. Out of the box nothing auto detects like most modern distribution and installing takes hours. Synaptic package manager runs slower then usual in MEPIS. It is extremely difficult to install commercial drivers. No COMPIZ, NO WIFI DETECTION, no graphics accelleration. The people who run the de facto support forums are morons and would not be successful running any other type of forum, and are only successful running mepis because they are the only mepis forum. The community is made up of jerks and liars.
You would say that brianfast (briang) - but that is because you are banned (again!) from the official forums for trolling.

As one of the 'morons' who runs the forum I would like to say how pleased we are be rid of you, as Mepislovers doesn't welcome people who like to post to offend and cause trouble.
 
Old 02-05-2008, 09:16 AM   #9
pardesi
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 7

Pros: Easy to Install, Fast
Cons: No Loader


I am a Newbie to Linux, I downloaded the iso and burn cd and installed on my computer. but it directly booted mepis ie did not ask for windows !! i tried a lot to get back to my windows. when i was googling to fix this i found that mepis does not have this facility by default, we need to edit the grub for this. Now i am afraid to touch this distribution, although i found it easy.

Later i had to install fedora to the mbr to boot windows.
 
Old 02-05-2008, 09:28 AM   #10
anticapitalista
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: antiX using herbstluftwm, i3, wmii, fluxbox, icewm and jwm.
Posts: 304

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Pros: Fast boot, very good hardware detection, easy to install and use.
Cons: Some people have problems with wifi setup


Actually Mepis does have that facility by default. On my box Mepis/antiX has not only correctly found my XP partition, but also various linux distros spread out across 2 hard disk drives.
It also did this successfully in VirtualBox, when triple booting antiX, arch linux and tinyme.

Maybe you just had bad luck. Give it another try.
 
Old 02-15-2008, 11:33 PM   #11
goofybritt
 
Registered: Feb 2008
Distribution: Linux Mint (Ubuntu-derivitive)
Posts: 6

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: ease of installation, superb hardware detection, debian-based, solid performance, great for noobs
Cons: lack of webcam support (but does any distro do well here? no)


As a fairly new linux user, I found the ease of installation amazing. Great hardware detection, wonderful support forum (mepislovers.org). One thing I've noticed that bothers me is my .bash_aliases doesn't stay activated between sessions. Weird.

The abundance of tools and apps that come pre-installed is by far the best feature of this distro besides stability and compatability with debian packages.

I am extremely happy with M7. This is my second time using Mepis. I had used version 3 for a while then went back to windows due to not being able to get wine installed (back then). I'm here to stay now. XD
 
Old 02-20-2008, 10:37 PM   #12
wb9smc
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Mandrake 10
Posts: 4

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: nice clean install, good hardware recognition
Cons: none


Simply Mepis 7.0 has an easy installation. Warren has done a nice job to configure the package to detect the most common hardware and install lots of useful software. All my systems use either usb or pcmcia wireless adapters so I have no problem using ndiswrapper if the adapter isn't natively recognized. Mepis works great on my T23 and T30 IBM laptops and also my homebrew Abit KU8 Athlon 64 3700mhz with Nvidia 6200 video card. I'm glad that Warren has gone back to the Debian core and dropped the Ubuntu ties. If I want Ubuntu I'll install Ubuntu....
 
Old 02-29-2008, 10:54 AM   #13
kazuya1977
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: crunchbang (debian squeeze), ubuntu 11.04, archbang (archlinux), salix 64, chakra, mepis
Posts: 42

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: excellent hardware detection, everything works, speed
Cons: none to speak of


This is simply the best OS, I have ever ran till date. The best for me many years back was Mepis 3.1 in 2004 i believe. I tried many other OS which i love as well, but mepis 7 takes the whole OS thing and features to a whole other level. I can easily mount and see data on drives almost unmountable. It is extremely fast and everything works with a massive array of apps to install via synaptic from debian. This OS is near unbreakable.
 
Old 03-10-2008, 07:37 PM   #14
angryfirelord
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Posts: 502

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: hardware detection, debian base, theme
Cons: network-manager doesn't work


After Warren decided that the Ubuntu base wasn't going in the direction he liked, he decided to switch back to using Debian Stable + a few custom built Mepis packages. (such as KDE 3.5.8 & a 2.6.22 kernel) Despite the change (again), Mepis still retains that easy-to-use installer that allowed me to install linux for the first time back at 3.4-3. Hardware detection has always been a strong point and this version is no exception. All hardware was working out-of-the-box and half an hour later, Mepis was installed on my harddrive.

As stated before, Mepis draws on the vast Debian repository, which counts for more than 18000 packages, plus a few Mepis built ones. Since it draws from the Stable repo, I know that program has been worked and hammered on so that it is nearly bug-free when I download it. There is the option of using the backports repo (must be added manually) which will give you some updated packages at the cost of some stability.

The only issue I had was using network-manager, which gets stuck at 28% when trying to connect. Fortunately, Mepis has a guide for using wicd, which immediately got my network back up and running. http://www.mepis.org/docs/en/index.php/Wicd

So, is Mepis worth your time? Well, if you want a distro that keeps compatibility with its parent distro without the post-install hassle, Mepis is something not to be passed by.
 
Old 03-16-2008, 10:48 AM   #15
Takla
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 188

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Easy Install, Fast, Light, Simple
Cons: i686 only. Mepis custom tools/configs may cause difficulties


My review is of antiX-M7.01 'Lysistrata' http://antix.mepis.org/index.php/Main_Page

Quote:
antiX is a fast, lightweight and easy to install linux live CD distribution based on MEPIS for Intel-AMD x86 compatible systems. antiX offers users the "Magic of Mepis" in an environment suitable for old computers
It's recommended to have at least 128 MB RAM to run antiX, though I hear it's satisfactory with half that + 128 MB swap on HDD.

antiX is a fluxbox respin of Mepis 7 and is based on Debian testing/lenny in preference to Mepis' Etch foundation. It does away with KDE, instead using fluxbox by default and also includes icewm. Like Mepis it's an installable live CD. The full version of antiX is just 310 MB and there is also an extremely stripped down version, antiX-M7.01-base, which is only 178 MB. I used the full version.

The CD boots up fast into the live environment. The log in manager is slim with custom theme (Live CD log in: user=demo, password=demo). The antiX desktop is a very nicely customised fluxbox. I'd used fluxbox before but only very briefly and I was impressed with how nicely set up this one is, it's surprisingly easy to use and of course very fast. Applications open instantly, removable drives automount as one would wish and so on. The default applications are well chosen, you can see the list here. It also includes all the Mepis utilities such as mnetwork, msystem etc and these are all available from the fluxbox menu, as is the option to install to HDD. The installer is the Mepis tool and works the same as on Mepis. I had one small problem, which is choosing to take over a pre-existing /home partition (from an old Xubuntu install) resulted in many important files failing to be written from the CD to /home so no .xinitrc or .fluxbox on first boot meant I had to startx manually and then try to figure out why I had no useable preconfigured Desktop Environment beyond icewm. My solution was to simply install again, allow the installer to format /home and then restore my data from backup. The install is very fast and this was speedier than trying to set up fluxbox the antiX way myself. Once installed I found that my zd1211rw based wireless adapter's driver was loading but it wasn't finding the firmware, despite it being there in /lib/firmware. I had experienced this with another distro and knew that the zd1211 firmware must be in its own folder /lib/firmware/zd1211 and not just in /lib/firmware/. This just took a minute or two to fix and then I was able to use the Mepis network tool to set up my WPA protected wireless and connect to my router. Very nice! Using the same adapter, driver and firmware in Debian Etch with network-manager I found WPA was broken/unavailable so this was a bonus (the adapater has worked with WPA for me in Zenwalk, Wolvix, Ubuntu etc....only Etch borked it). The install and config was otherwise without issues and thoroughly unexciting which is as it should be. I have also installed antiX on laptops using Intel ipw2200 and 3495 wireless and everything worked out of the box.

The first thing I noticed about antiX installed to HDD is how light it is, using very little RAM, perhaps 30-50% of the resources of a typical Gnome based distro like Ubuntu Gutsy. Of course fluxbox doesn't have the deluxe comforts of Gnome, so I added pyNeighborhood for browsing network shares and a few other applications. Fluxbox was very nice to use, I actually read some docs(!) and found I could tab together any applications I liked...wow! and that the default file manager Rox Filer is actually rather impressive and useful. It was easy to set up my own wallpaper, log in background, default applications for various file types etc. But ultimately I want Xfce so I used Synaptic to very easily install xfce4 and the goodies package and one or two other associated packages, following this excellent howto at mepislovers http://www.mepislovers.org/forums/sh...highlight=xfce to configure logging in, shutting down and so on. I was pleased at how easy this was. The result is that I have an Xfce desktop that's virtually as light on resources as the fluxbox default. I've tried various Xfce flavour distros (Xubuntu, Zenwalk, Wolvix, Debian-Xfce) and also installed Arch with Xfce. antiX has proven to be the most capable (i.e. my hardware is supported easily, everything works, there is every application I could ever need right from the repos) and also the lightest....yes lighter than Arch and lighter than Zenwalk....definitely lighter than Xubuntu Gutsy!!!!

Things that worked in antiX that don't always work (without intervention/configuration/wailing and gnashing of teeth) in other lightweight distros:

WPA!
Laptop power management (including screen dimming on battery)
Laptop CPU frequency scaling
Laptop suspend on closing lid
Laptop resume after suspend with no issues and full wireless connectivity! (I've used too many distros where suspend works but resume doesn't....kind of frustrating).

Also I added (for an easier life) Wicd:

I installed Wicd on my laptops for easier wireless roaming. On a desktop the mepis network tool is sufficient but if you routinely connect to different wireless networks it's nice to have it as quick and easy as possible. There's a strong possibility that Wicd will be included by default in the next antiX release.

On my desktop I installed the nvidia proprietary drivers using the nvidia method. No problems. I re-used xorg.conf from previous distro as I knew it to be good.

Testing/Unstable:

I found it extremely easy to upgrade(?) my 3 computers to sid/unstable from the antiX testing base. There is a good sticky at antixforums: http://antix.freeforums.org/upgrade-...what-t271.html and I had no issues.

Mepis peculiarities:

Mepis ships with its own custom kernel and has its own repos. So although I'm running unstable I am still using the Mepis kernel 2.6.22-18mepis1 (now patched against the vmsplice vulnerability). This is fine with me as it supports all my hardware very nicely (and it seems to me that the newest kernels are rather more resource hungry).

Mepis has its own custom set up for mounting external media (USB drives etc) and a rather unusual fstab with dynamically created entries on boot. Extra hard/flash drives (external and internal) will appear in the dynamic section and this can be a problem if you like to mount those drives/partitions in a particular place like a folder in ~/ So it's a good idea to edit fstab to cater to your set up, placing those extra drives/partitions in the static list in correct order (i.e. after /home if you want them mounted in ~/). There are also some anomalies with the mtab/fstab proc entries which generates errors at boot (no harm done, just messages). this can also be corrected while you edit fstab, guide here: http://www.mepislovers.org/forums/sh...ght=procbususb These will be minor or non-existent issues for many users and are easily fixed.

Mepis Networking:

mepis uses its own mnetwork tool and a highly customised /etc/network/interfaces file. This is fine for desktop/laptop use but may cause problems if you need to run DHCP server (i.e. you use your Mepis installed computer to share out your internet connection using NAT). I found it impossible to run DHCP server with this config as the static (LAN facing) network adapter must be set up with gateway unconfigured, while mnetwork requires the Mepis /etc/network/interfaces file to be default with gateway configured. This leaves you with either DHCP server always fails (default interfaces file) or no networking at all (modified interfaces file). My solution was to uninstall mnetwork, edit etc/network/interfaces to only show the loopback device and static ethernet adapter and then install network-manager. I assume that in the default Mepis with KDE tools this would not be an issue but I don't know.

Some other light distros I tried compared to antiX....

Debian: Warren Woodford's Mepis adds some nice ease-of-use polish to Debian in the form of the Mepis tools and the custom Mepis kernel seems fine to me. antiX does a great job of making the Mepis enhancements available in a very lightweight OS. Debian possibly has the advantage if you don't like the Mepis tools or customised configs, or you want/need a newer kernel from testing/unstable.

Zenwalk: Zenwalk is great, hard to criticise really, has excellent custom tools including its own very good dependency tracking package manager, but anything Debian based will always have the huge advantage of the Debian repositories and apt/aptitude/Synaptic. I would use Zenwalk if I wasn't so satisfied with antiX and familiar with Debian type distros.

Xubuntu: Xubuntu cannot really be considered a light distro any more. Its Gutsy incarnation is resource hungry, heavily Gnome based and lacks stability. The quality of many packages is questionable. Ubuntu uses fixed point releases and does very limited backporting so it's not possible to use it as a rolling release like you can with other Debian derivatives. Xubuntu probably has the prettier installer compared to Mepis/antiX but hopefully that's something you don't use too often. Ubuntu documentation is very good, and the Ubuntu forums are a great resource but I have fewer problems in antiX than Xubuntu so less need of vast forums....take your pick :-) antiX forums are actually very good and if you do have some difficulty or suggestion chances are you will be quickly be discussing it with anticapitalista himself (antiX is anticapitalista's project). I never chatted with Mr Shuttleworth on Ubuntu forums...perhaps he was avoiding me :-)

Wolvix: Wolvix is impressive as a live CD and is installable. While it has an excellent set of default packages it can't compete with Debian's repos. I found the documentation rather out of date, to the point that it wasn't applicable to the recent version in some important areas (such as the post install archive).

Arch: I used Arch very briefly while looking for a good rolling release distro. I had heard the hype so was eager to try it. It almost lived up to it ;-) I ran into some issues with hardware detection in the installer, no big deal but surprising with very widely used hardware. It seemed like a lot of work to get to a point that's usually achieved without fuss in other distros. I didn't mind too much because I don't mind reading docs and was eager for the legendary blazing performance.....hmmm..it was fast and light, but not amazing. With default Xfce desktop on top of simple base (no extra services) it used far more resources than antiX+Xfce, but I think this might be down to the newer kernel used by Arch. It was a lot of work to get to the same point as is default in antiX (i.e. all hardware correctly detected + configured, X configured correctly, desktop environment + applications installed) and there was no performance benefit, in fact antiX was faster and lighter.

Vector: I tried it a few times, if they ever get WPA configurable and working in a GUI I'd possibly have another look. I just didn't get along with it....am kind of nervous of projects from English speaking countries where the docs and website haven't been through a spellchecker and the English is..err...idiomatic and unique. Attention to detail is important, more important to me than cool messages scrolling across the installer. Again it's basically fine, good custom tools, and again it's not faster than antiX + Xfce, nor does it have the range of packages.

Slackware: see Arch, similar issues basically though I think Slackware's hardware detection was more reliable (from memory, it's been a while).

DSL, Puppy etc: I use them but never had the desire to install them to HDD, only to USB flash drive.

Overall I've found antiX to be easy to install, easy to use, requiring minimal configuration and is extremely stable even running unstable/Sid. I've outlined a few problems I encountered but the most important thing for me was that only one of them was serious (DHCP and NAT) and all were resolvable. There is excellent information available in the antix forums and at mepislovers. I've been running antiX for a few months on one laptop and recently moved my other laptop and my desktop to it. I have had far fewer problems with antiX and better performance than with any other distro. I had been using Xubuntu Feisty and Gutsy on my different computers, and before that openSuse and sometimes Zenwalk and a few others such as Wolvix, Arch, Slackware, Debian while looking for the right one. antiX has proven to be very easy to install, substantially faster and generally easier to work with than others. I like the fact that all the Debian testing and unstable packages are available to me and I've found the quality of many packages in Debian is superior to the same packages in Ubuntu, giving me a far more stable system. Applications which frequently crashed in Ubuntu stay up indefinitely in antiX. My networking is now completely stable, previously it would occasionally lose connection to the the router. I no longer find my systems freezing or X crashing. Stability is very boring and satisfying! Imo antiX makes for a first class OS for anyone wanting speed and stability on a proven base (Debian/Mepis) with vast array of applications available and easily accessible help and information. It is also close to ideal as a foundation for building exactly what you want on top of a stable base; the Mepis installer and tools get you up with hardware, X and networking good out of the box and then you can start mixing and matching to put together the desktop you want.

edit: just want to add that for many people the default antiX fluxbox environment will be ideal and antiX itself will meet all their needs on a desktop or laptop. I love Xfce so my review reflects the fact that I used antiX as a base to build on. I have no crtitcism of fluxbox or the antiX set up, it's excellent as it is. Fortunately me for me it's also very adaptable.
 
Old 03-16-2008, 03:07 PM   #16
lucky9
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 41

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Ease of install, fast, fully usable as is, easily added to
Cons: haven't run across it yet, must be one or two....



If you have a average computer it will zing along. Fits a lot of older stuff I hear.
 
Old 04-13-2008, 05:14 PM   #17
rich_c
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: Mepis; Maemo; openSUSE
Posts: 384

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: More of the same SimplyMepis quality.
Cons: 64 bit issues?


Installing as a dual boot with Vista 32bit was a breeze! If you've got 64 bit hardware, probably best to have a 32 bit OS alternative alongside the 64 bit version but is perfect for MOST things.
 
Old 09-28-2008, 06:23 AM   #18
dr_agon
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.04
Posts: 80

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: stable
Cons: too old versions of libraries


After trying Ubuntu I looked for more stable system, and decided to give Mepis a try.
Installation on my desktop with AMD64 went smooth, but I do not have any unusual hardware, so I did not expect troubles here.
Runs without any unexpected errors.
The only one problem, which can be considered a bug, is power management - it cannot properly suspend or hibernate and wake up. It may be related to my mainboard with NVidia chipset and AMD64 processor. I did not investigate this issue yet.
I made it a host system with couple of guest systems installed under VirtualboxOSE. In this way I have a stable system for basic needs and virtual machines as sandboxes for my development and testing tasks. Virtual machines run smoothly and I'm very happy with this configuration :-)
The thing that really can be a problem is the lack of recent libraries (KDE etc.). Mepis is based on repositories from Debian Etch, while many recent applications use version from Lenny. When I want to install a version of an application newer than existing in repository (e.g. due to bug fixes in newest version) it usually complains of many libraries which need update, beyond version in repositories. When you do update libraries you may end up with unstable system. (It happened to me. I reinstalled the system and now I test everything within virtual machine first). I realize this is the price for stability of the system, but sometime I just need something new. I hope that when current Debian testing (Lenny) become stable the next release will have more recent versions. For now I just must be careful with updates.
Overall impression: very nice.
 
Old 10-15-2008, 02:01 PM   #19
namida12
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Distribution: 64-bit Mepis
Posts: 129

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Installs on most systems I have tried
Cons: Would like a GUI for Yamal's ATI, and Nvidia Video Card install scripts.


SimplyMepis 7 was released in December 2007, and has matured with many users contributing or backporting newer/updated software packages that are a breeze to install via Synaptic, or apt-get.

I put groceries on the table cleaning or repairing computers systems with Microsoft Window or Vista installed. When I first receive a non working or very slow computer always try to boot them with Mepis 7, and I am surprised many times, that a non working system boots up, when the shop or owner has reported the system is non functional.

I use SimplyMepis 7, or Mepis 7 mainly for its outstanding hardware recognition, and the easy Live CD booting procedure to check computers I receive for work... Comming from a Microsoft Windows environment using the same CD to boot a computer system in less than a minute still makes me smile.

I use the Usenet and having updated versions of Pan, and Knode are important to me. Two programs I use every day, and these updated versions come from the testing or experimental part of the vast debian software collection. The dedicated Mepis community members that provide this software backporting have my fondest complements.

Mepis 7, in both the 32 & 64-bit releases are great, easy to use & provide a method to become familiar using linux with a live CD. The installation procedure is easy to understand and accomplish. The entire installation can be finished in 15 or 20 minutes, depending on the size of your hard drive and if your printer is on the list when adding a printer.

Customizing your splash screens, backgrounds & changing your taskbar/kicker about is simple and intuitive with a mouse right click in the taskbar/kicker.

I joined my local users group, to become familiar using Linux and to network with other Linux users. I have run Mepis since I first switched from Microsoft windows, and have a growing number of retired users in the area already using Mepis.

I believe when fixed income retired citizens, are able to learn & use this version of Linux, and keep their older computer systems with a copy of Mepis 7 keeping it running long after the original O/S was no longer supported, anyone can...

JR
 
Old 01-22-2009, 11:26 AM   #20
Okie2003
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 21

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Great community, simple install, works well with most hardware
Cons: Hummm...


Mepis made it possible for this non-techie to move my office, home, and laptop computers to Linux in 2004
 




  



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