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Slackware 12.0
Reviews Views Date of last review
31 653040 10-29-2008
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $49.95 9.7



Description: Well folks, it's that time to announce a new stable Slackware release
again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.0!
Since we've moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and
fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware
12.0 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 11.0) and is a
must-have upgrade for any Slackware user.

This first Slackware edition of the year combines Slackware's legendary
simplicity (and close tracking of original sources), stability, and
security with some of the latest advances in Linux technology. Expect no
less than the best Slackware yet.

Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you'll find
two of the most advanced desktop environments available today: Xfce 4.4.1,
a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy to use desktop
environment, and KDE 3.5.7, the latest version of the award-winning K
Desktop Environment. We have added to Slackware support for HAL (the
Hardware Abstraction Layer) which allows the system administrator to add
users to the cdrom and plugdev groups. Then they will be able to use items
such as USB flash sticks, USB cameras that appear like USB storage,
portable hard drives, CD and DVD media, MP3 players, and more, all without
requiring sudo, the mount or umount command. Just plug and play.
Properly set up, Slackware's desktop should be suitable for any level of
Linux experience.

Slackware uses the 2.6.21.5 kernel bringing you advanced performance
features such as journaling filesystems, SCSI and ATA RAID volume support,
SATA support, Software RAID, LVM (the Logical Volume Manager, and
encrypted filesystems. Kernel support for X DRI (the Direct Rendering
Interface) brings high-speed hardware accelerated 3D graphics to Linux.
We have switched from the older one-piece X11 Window System to the newest
modular X11 from X.Org, which should be simpler to maintain and will
likely speed up development of new features for X (such as translucent
windows and a few other things that are on the horizon).

There are two kinds of kernels in Slackware -- the huge kernels, which
contain support for just about every driver in the Linux kernel. These are
primarily intended to be used for installation, but there's no real reason
that you couldn't continue to run them after you have installed. The
other type of kernel is the generic kernel, in which nearly every driver
is built as a module. To use a generic kernel you'll need to build an
initrd to load your filesystem module and possibly your drive controller
or other drivers needed at boot time, configure LILO to load the initrd at
boot, and reinstall LILO. See the docs in /boot after installing for more
information. Slackware's Linux kernels come in both SMP and non-SMP types
now. The SMP kernel supports multiple processors, multi-core CPUs,
HyperThreading, and about every other optimization available. In our own
testing this kernel has proven to be fast, stable, and reliable. We
recommend using the SMP kernel even on single processor machines if it
will run on them.

From the beginning, Slackware has offered a stable and secure Linux
distribution for UNIX veterans as well as an easy-to-use system for
beginners. Slackware includes everything you'll need to run a powerful
server or workstation. Each Slackware package follows the setup and
installation instructions from its author(s) as closely as possible,
offering you the most stable and easily expandable setup.

Here are some of the advanced features of Slackware 12.0:

- Runs the 2.6.21.5 version of the Linux kernel from ftp.kernel.org.
Also included is a kernel patched with Speakup to support speech
synthesizers providing access to Linux for the visually impaired
community. The 2.6.x kernel series has matured into a stable
kernel, and provides reliable performance for your desktop or
your production server.

- System binaries are linked with the GNU C Library, version 2.5.
This version of glibc also has excellent compatibility with
existing binaries.

- X11 7.2.0. This is the X.Org Foundation's modular X Window System.
You will notice many more X package than before, and it's probably
best to install them all. There's been much activity in the X
development world, and the improvements here in terms of performance
and hardware support are sure to be only the beginning.

- Installs gcc-4.1.2 as the default C, C++, Objective-C,
Fortran-77/95, and Ada 95 compiler.

- Support for fully encrypted network connections with OpenSSL,
OpenSSH, OpenVPN, and GnuPG.

- Apache (httpd) 2.2.4 web server with Dynamic Shared Object
support, SSL, and PHP 5.2.3.

- PCMCIA, CardBus, USB, IEE1394 (FireWire) and ACPI support. This
makes Slackware a great operating system for your laptop.

- The udev dynamic device management system for Linux 2.6.x.
This locates and configures most hardware automatically as it
is added (or removed) from the system, and creates the access
nodes in /dev. It also loads the kernel modules required by
sound cards and other hardware at boot time.

- New development tools, including Perl 5.8.8, Python 2.5.1,
Ruby 1.8.6, Subversion 1.4.4, git-1.5.2.2, mercurial-0.9.4,
graphical tools like Qt designer and KDevelop, and much more.

- Updated versions of the Slackware package management tools make it
easy to add, remove, upgrade, and make your own Slackware packages.
Package tracking makes it easy to upgrade from Slackware 11.0 to
Slackware 12.0 (see CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT). The slackpkg tool in
/extra can also help update from an older version of Slackware to
a newer one, and keep your Slackware system up to date. In
addition, the slacktrack utility (in extra/) will help you build
and maintain your own packages.

- Web browsers galore! Includes KDE's Konqueror 3.5.7,
SeaMonkey 1.1.2 (this is the replacement for the Mozilla
Suite), and the immensely popular Firefox 2.0.0.4, as well as
the Thunderbird 2.0.0.4 email and news client with advanced
junk mail filtering.

- The complete K Desktop Environment (KDE) version 3.5.7, including
the KOffice productivity suite, networking tools, GUI development
with KDevelop, multimedia tools (including the amazing Amarok
music player), the Konqueror web browser and file manager, dozens
of games and utilities, international language support, and more.

- A collection of GTK+ based applications including pidgin-2.0.2,
gimp-2.2.15, gkrellm-2.2.10, gxine-0.5.11, xchat-2.8.2, xsane-0.994,
and pan-0.131.

- Large repository of extra software packages compiled and ready to
run. This includes various window managers, the Java(TM) 2 Software
Development Kit Standard Edition, libsafe (buffer overflow protection
for additional security), ISDN support, additional 802.11 drivers,
and much more (see the /extra directory).

- Many more improved and upgraded packages than we can list here. For
a complete list of core packages in Slackware 12.0, see this file:

ftp://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackwar...0/PACKAGES.TXT


Downloading Slackware 12.0:
---------------------------

The full version of Slackware Linux 12.0 is available for download from
the central Slackware FTP sites hosted by our friends at www.cwo.com
and osuosl.org:

ftp://slackware.osuosl.org/pub/slack...lackware-12.0/
ftp://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackware/slackware-12.0/

If the sites are busy, see the list of official mirror sites here:

http://slackware.com/getslack/

We will be setting up BitTorrent downloads for the official ISO images.
Stay tuned to http://slackware.com for the latest updates.

Instructions for burning the Slackware tree onto install discs may be
found in the isolinux directory.


Purchasing Slackware on CD-ROM:
-------------------------------

Or, please consider purchasing the Slackware Linux 12.0 six CD-ROM set
directly from Slackware Linux, and you'll be helping to support the
continued development of Slackware Linux! :-)

This is the official release of Slackware on CD-ROM, and has many enhanced
features, including:

- Easy bootable CD-ROM installation. If your machine can boot a
CD-ROM, just boot the first disc to begin the installation process.
- The source code used to build Slackware Linux 12.0.

The price for the Slackware Linux CD-ROM set is $49.95 plus shipping.

Slackware 12.0 is also available on a single DVD for $59.95 plus shipping.

Slackware Linux is also available by subscription. When we release a new
version of Slackware (which is normally once or twice a year) we ship it
to you and bill your credit card $32.95 plus shipping. Shipping is $5 in
the USA, Canada, and Mexico for First Class. Overseas is $9 PER ORDER.
There is an additional $3 COD charge (USA Only). UPS Blue Label (2nd day)
[USA Only] is $10 PER ORDER, UPS Red Label (next day) [USA Only] is $15
PER ORDER.

Before ordering express shipping, you may wish to check that we have the
product in stock. We make releases to the net at the same time as disc
production begins, so there is a lag between the online release and the
shipping of media. But, even if you download now you can still buy the
official media later. You'll feel good, be helping the project, and have
a great decorative item perfect for any computer room shelf. :-)


Ordering Information:
---------------------

You can order online at the Slackware Linux store:
http://store.slackware.com

Other Slackware items like t-shirts, caps, pins, and stickers
can also be found here. These will help you find and identify
yourself to your fellow Slackware users. :-)

Order inquiries (including questions about becoming a Slackware
reseller) may be directed to this address:
info@slackware.com

Or, send a check or money order to:

Slackware Linux, Inc.
1164 Claremont Drive
Brentwood, CA 94513
USA


Have fun! :^) I hope you find Slackware to be useful, and thanks
very much for your support of this project over the years.

---
Patrick J. Volkerding

Visit us on the web at: http://slackware.com
Keywords: 2.6.x KDE XFCE KDevelop Firefox Apache udev SeaMonkey speech development


Author
Post A Reply 
Old 07-02-2007, 05:52 PM   #1
bird603568
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Slackware current
Posts: 250

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, lightweight, simple and stable
Cons: No media hype



Just as fast and stable as the previous releases
 
Old 07-15-2007, 09:37 PM   #2
ta0kira
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: FreeBSD 9.1, Kubuntu 12.10
Posts: 3,078

Rep: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Linux 2.6.x, gcc 4.x.x, XFCE 4.1.1 (big advancements), very easy to install, works with old config files for the most part,
Cons: no choice to NOT install kernel, sometimes have to recompile kernel to get modules to load initially, NO MORE pthread REFERENCE IN info:libc OR manpages!, modular XOrg?, poor explanation of setting up speech<->text (not that I need it), Quanta still


Slackware is by far my favorite distro.&nbsp; Even though I have the occasional problems, I just can't deal with distros that try to use wizardry to "help you out".&nbsp; A very fundamental rule with Slackware, since it doesn't provide the nice tools like RedHat, etc. do for configuration is to AVOID KDE GUI-BASED CONFIG TOOLS!&nbsp; That isn't a Slackware caution; it applies to anything.&nbsp; Bugs have been known to sever hard links or delete things such as /etc/passwd.<br><br>I upgraded, in a sense, from 11.0 on my Compaq laptop by starting the install CD and running pkgtool to remove the old packages.&nbsp; To do this I had to mount all of my old partitions first.&nbsp; I left them mounted to run setup, but still had to provide a root partition to the program.&nbsp; This was not a problem, though, as it installed in the correct locations and let me pass up the opportunity to overwrite fstab.&nbsp; It didn't insist on overwriting anything else in /etc, and in fact left my /etc/rc.d/rc.local fully intact!&nbsp; It did not give me the option to skip kernel install, though, which upset me a little.&nbsp; I don't run lilo from my main installation; I run it from a bare "fix things when they break" text-only installation on the same machine.&nbsp; It's much safer that way, so do it!&nbsp; For some reason modules would not load after installation!&nbsp; I had to rebuild the kernel, which I have no problem doing since I've done it countless times and there are some great new kernel features.<br><br>KDE is pretty much the same as in 11.0.&nbsp; XFCE, however, has come a long way.&nbsp; It's on its way up toward the top, I think.&nbsp; It handles transparency A LOT better than KDE does, and even gives "you are root" banners when using as root.&nbsp; Yes, I run X as root sometimes.&nbsp; Don't tell anyone!&nbsp; The fish protocol is really the best reason to use KDE I think.<br><br>12.0 comes with a few more web browsers, but they are based on Mozilla/Netscape, so they aren't REALLY different.&nbsp; I do seem to have less X fonts, for some reason.<br><br>GCC seems more strict than that provided with 11.0.&nbsp; I seem to be getting a few errors/warnings I wasn't before, which is good (not by virtue, but because of what they say.)&nbsp; GCC is quite an impressive product to be getting for free.<br><br>I don't develop with KDevelop.&nbsp; I like to use Kate, Konqueror with one tab in Cervisa and one normal view with a terminal emulator at the bottom.&nbsp; This works extremely well, so I don't ever need KDevelop.&nbsp; That means I have no opinion of new vs. old.&nbsp; I can't seem to get Quanta to work, though, which is a step back from 11.0.&nbsp; I even deleted the config folder for it in my profile, but it still can't load my doc!&nbsp; I think it's the doc tree that does it.<br><br>I don't know Patrick's feelings on the politics of OpenOffice, but I really wish Slackware would come with it!&nbsp; I find KOffice almost unusable at times, especially KSpread with extensive calculations.&nbsp; And what about Gnome?&nbsp; Yes, yes, it is too difficult to maintain.&nbsp; Understandable.&nbsp; I think one would find this with KDE, too, if one were to pay attention to holes in the default state of KDevelop, though.<br><br>For some reason the libc infopages don't have pthread references anymore, and I don't have manpages for the functions.&nbsp; This might seem trivial to someone who doesn't write software, but for me this is HUGE!&nbsp; The previous docs were amazingly helpful.&nbsp; Chances are libc docs were generated without linuxthreads, but pthreads proper seem to still be there.&nbsp; Maybe the "portable" threads have replaced them and there is still back-comp linkage for pthreads?&nbsp; No depricated warnings.&nbsp; Hmmm...<br><br>A lot of formal reviews of Slackware detract from it's rating because it apparently doesn't have a large software selection included.&nbsp; This is VERY incorrect!&nbsp; In fact, some of the most useful tools are not found in KDE menus (pretty much only KDE and aesthetic X programs are,) but are hidden within bin directories.&nbsp; Take a look at the manpages in the help center or KPackage!&nbsp; Slackware has loads of useful command line tools and even some amazing X programs not found in the menus (such as XFig, which seems primative at first glance, but can take on nearly all "fancy" looking diagram tools.)<br><br>Something Slackware seems to be improving on is default support of alternative file systems.&nbsp; With Slackware 10.0, you pretty much had to load a module from a flash drive to install on an XFS partition.&nbsp; With 11.0 I had to do the same for JFS.&nbsp; Now I don't need to prebuild any modules.<br><br>It's nice to finally have a 2.6.x kernel and udev enabled by default.&nbsp; I've used encrypted file systems since 10.0 and with 12.0 I don't have to upgrade anything just to get to my partitions.&nbsp; With udev rules and a few scripts, I'm able to have many encrypted loopbacks that automount when I attach a flash drive with the encryption keys.<br><br>A lot of what I mention seems like basic functionality, but Slackware makes it very easy for an experienced Linuxer to do what they need to do.&nbsp; No fancy config tools and a well thought out configuration layout.&nbsp; Nothing says "Slackware would like to help you" or "Please wait while Slackware scans your computer for your convenience".&nbsp; I don't want any of that crap!<br><br>For newbies out there, Slackware is a great way to learn Linux.&nbsp; What makes Windows break (among other things) is it's covert manipulation of configuration with pretty little messages; the same goes for improperly-designed Linux tools.&nbsp; Slackware makes you get into the weeds and ask questions, and when you finally figure it out you can do it on any system, and eventually you will be irritated at how a lot of distros make you feel just as stupid after a year as you do on the first day.&nbsp; Slackware is a great investment of your time, and though you have to edit config files by hand, it builds character, and that's really what protects your system from you.&nbsp; If you are scared to edit a config file, you should be!&nbsp; GUI tools don't give you that fear of messing it up, so that's what you end up doing.<br><br>All of my complaints aside, Slackware is a very secure and stable system, which cannot be tangibly explained in a review.&nbsp; That's the main reason I use it.<br><br>This has gone on long enough.&nbsp; Download Slackware 12.0 and be happy.&nbsp; Don't believe their site when it says "ISOs on torrent only"; just search for "Slackware 12.0 ISO" and you will find a fast download somewhere.<br><br>One more thing!&nbsp; The latest version of GTK+!&nbsp; If you've ever tried to upgrade GTK+, you know that it's quite possibly the biggest ass-pain of an upgrade you will ever attempt, asside from building KDE or XOrg 7.x from source.
 
Old 07-20-2007, 05:18 PM   #3
manwichmakesameal
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 800

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Lightweight distro, easy to customize (I guess that could go for any distro), it's Slack
Cons: None


I've been slackin since 10.0, and this is the best one yet. I don't know about the installer, as I've just upgraded since 10.2. I like the addition of hal and the 2.6 kernel.
 
Old 07-21-2007, 03:37 PM   #4
gargamel
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Slackware, SLAX, OpenSuSE
Posts: 1,601

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Consistency, ease of use, ease of administration
Cons:


Version 12.0 continues the philosophy of Slackware, which is based on consistency. There's no other distribution outthere that can be upgraded without any hassle over so many years. And: You can still use your admin knowledge with version 9.x in 12.0. That's conservative in the best sense, as technologically there are lots of big changes in this release. I really appreciate the way HAL, D-BUS and KDE collaborate.

Slackware 12.0 is the best Slackware ever, which means damn good. Because Pat V. and his team achieved the impossible: Slackware is now up-to-date, regarding end-user experience, while it still keeps things simple and pure for system administrators and software developers. It's now possible to use USB sticks and drives without issuing mount commands on the CLI, just like in "modern" distros. For people with lots of removable storage media this really eases some pains.

With the latest advances Slackware 12.0 can now be recommended as a distribution for Linux users with little experience. At the same time it's what it always was: A top-notch distro for admins and developers. This hasn't been spoiled a bit with the new release.

And the extended collection of software means that one can get a job just done, because the tools that needed to be downloaded, installed and configured before, are now part of the system. The packages included with version 12.0 resemble end-users demand, more than ever.

One key feature of Slackware always was to avoid vendor specific patches as far as possible. And that means, that Slackware Linux is probably the purest of all distributions. Practical advantage: Everything that runs on Linux can run on Slackware Linux.

Very good, and highly recommended!

Alex Bär
 
Old 07-27-2007, 12:33 AM   #5
linuxismanshobby
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: superfast and very stable ; could leave your rig on for weeks
Cons: no official 64-bit version ; although slamd and bluewhite64 exist


slick and superfast with total control .. need i say more !
 
Old 07-27-2007, 08:30 PM   #6
tellef
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Distribution: Slackware & Debian.
Posts: 23

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Simple installer, very easy to configure, very stable.
Cons: Not so aesy installation if you have linux-raid-drives.


Read Pat`s introduction, needless to say anything more.
 
Old 08-01-2007, 08:00 AM   #7
ahmed gamal
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Distribution: slackware + XP
Posts: 591

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


slackware is my best OS
i like it than other distribution
 
Old 08-09-2007, 06:58 AM   #8
D.A.
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 6

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Very stable, no bugs; working fast; offers a lot of opportunities;
Cons: maybe a little bit difficult to use - comparing with mandriva; otherwise nothing against it;


I've tried RH Liunx 9, Mandriva 2007.0 and 2007.1, and... Slackware. I think it's the best distribution, and it has everything I need. I'm sure I won't switch to another Linux distro.
 
Old 08-12-2007, 07:10 AM   #9
spoon
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Slackware 10.2, 11.0 and 12.0
Posts: 14

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, Fast. HAL
Cons: THe HP Printer install program. No Gnome..


Works on all computers I have tried it on. I miss Gnome but thats fairly easy to get with Garnome or such installers.
THE HP packages that is to make it easier to install HP printers is a mess, but it's a mess no matter what distro it's in, not specific for SLW12.

//Spoon
 
Old 08-26-2007, 04:34 PM   #10
yoron
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Posts: 120

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Pros:
Cons:


Does anyone know if there is a ready made xen distribution for
Slackware 12? I would love to have it virtual :) Sort of..
 
Old 08-26-2007, 04:35 PM   #11
yoron
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Posts: 120

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: The coolest
Cons: Xen


Sorry I will corect this..
 
Old 09-23-2007, 12:46 PM   #12
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $49.95 | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure Linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn Linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert.
I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other Linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Thanx to people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 09-26-2007, 05:56 PM   #13
dafunks
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Distribution: Slackware 12
Posts: 62

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0

Pros: It's Slackware .. nothing else matters!!!!
Cons: shush .. the politically correct term is prisoners


Fast, configurable, reliable .. simply Slackware.

Genuine thanks go to the creator, maintainers and contributors of the Slackware project.
 
Old 09-26-2007, 05:59 PM   #14
dafunks
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Distribution: Slackware 12
Posts: 62

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


Dammit, I forgot the rating.
 
Old 10-02-2007, 10:47 AM   #15
Su-Shee
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 509

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: very well equipped, but no clutter, excellent base for own builds
Cons:


Well, I'm a Slackware die-hard in any case since the early 90ies, but this is really one oft the best Slackwares so far.

This time, I judge from a different point of view, because I started to play around with graphic software of any kind while waiting for Slackware 12.

Slack 12 is very well prepared for everything you might want to have: Gimp pre 2.4, Inkscape from SVN (pre 0.46), synfig, Cinelerra - you name it, Slack 12 is ready for it, compiles it or even got ready to install packages on slacky.eu or elsewhere.

The Italians over at slacky.eu offer a recent non-intrusive Gnome for Slack 12 (&quot;GSlacky&quot;) which makes this Slackware to a visually pleasing experience Linux hasn't offered so far. (Boy, do I LOVE to sell Slackware.. :)

Compiz fusion and emerald worked out of the box swareted from slacky.eu (based on AIGLX), a new XGL from CVS compiled childlike with closed eyes and despite all this it is still a lean, nice Slackware.

A Unicode environment is no problem either; the scim input method can be easily installed afterwards - the right fonts are already included and with a few environment variables (which I didn't change since .. 2005) all is up and running.

I really love Slackware especially for the reason that things JUST compile: pre-4 KDE from source? Yes. Garnome? Yes. My Perl 6 stuff? Yes.

If this is plain vanilla Linux, then I don't need triple brownie chocolate chunk cookie dough belgian truffle Linuxes. :)
 
Old 10-10-2007, 09:22 AM   #16
mpyusko
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Distribution: Salckware ver 10.1 - 14.1, Debian too.
Posts: 364

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy install. Rock solid! Ready to go as a workstation or a server.
Cons: My only problem is I don't have anything to put in this field.



I started using slackware a few years ago. I just recently upgraded all my machines to 12. It runs as well on my k6-2/400 as it does on my p3/1GHz. As with most distros the more RAM the better, but I don't have any real issues running it with 128MB. Still works great on the older stuff. HAL makes it much easier for the novice user. I can't wait to see what Pat has in mind for the next release.
 
Old 10-25-2007, 11:50 PM   #17
trebek
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu, gOS, Debian & Slack 12
Posts: 426

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Simplicity, documentation, stability, long time in the scene
Cons:


I can't believe i used other distros before Slackware. Of course it's not as easy to get used to, but just by being a Linux user before, you can get on the right track with just a little effort to read about what you need.

I must say that sometimes i get lost and can't find answers, but the people here in LQ have always risen up to the occasion!!! Sorry if i didn't put a lot of techie information, i am not that savvy, but at least i do get around with Slack and so far it's been a nice ride.

Can't wait to learn much more with the help of all you Slack users out there and of course, RESEARCHING and READING.
 
Old 11-08-2007, 11:34 AM   #18
vtel57
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Distribution: Slackware64
Posts: 858

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: SPEED and STABILITY
Cons: Not recommended for new users of the GNU/Linux operating system


Slackware is one of the oldest, best-maintained, and highest quality distributions available. It's stability is legendary. The only other distro I've found to be this stable is Debian. Slack is FAST, too! Very FAST! Once understood, Slack is easily manipulated and customized. It's a "tinkerer's delight" to use and play with.

Enjoy! :)
 
Old 11-19-2007, 12:43 PM   #19
dkpw
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: LinuxMint16 & Ubuntu 12.0.4 LTS
Posts: 218

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, stable, powerful and configurable
Cons: Like everybody has said - not for those new to Linux


Read the reviews here on LinuxQuestions, read the problems people have in the forum and if you are up for a bit of learning and hand tweaking you will be amply rewarded with simply the best version of Linux out there.

If you are scared having done some research, plump for Ubuntu.
 
Old 12-13-2007, 06:17 PM   #20
BiafraRepublic
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 6

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Fast, stable, configurable, probably one of the last distros to come with all the usual development tools needed to compile programs and kernel.
Cons: GNOME series gone, still f@#%!ng using LILO to boot


Quite simply put, the custom cycle shop of Linux distros.

Now if only Patrick Volkerding could just switch to GNU GRUB...
 
Old 12-28-2007, 01:35 PM   #21
meetscott
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 411

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, stable, flexible. Don't kid yourself. There's nothing better out there.
Cons: Sometimes requires extensive customization... oh wait! I think that just what I do with it.


I have been using Slackware for 13 years. I have tried many other distros at work and at home. There's simply nothing that even comes close to Slackware. It's easy to build anything from source and it's easy to customize. I also prefer BSD init rather than System V and Slackware is one of the few BSD init distros left.

If you want to *learn* Linux, use Slackware. If you want to *use* Linux use Slackware, unless you're a *wimp* then use Kubuntu. Kubuntu is what I recommend to people who don't want to get their hands dirty. I don't recommend Gnome-based anything to anyone.

Not sure why the previous person is stuck on Grub. I've used Grub and Lilo. I like Lilo better because I know it better but to be honest, I only see the Lilo boot screen once every few months.
 
Old 12-30-2007, 12:55 AM   #22
jjthomas
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Distribution: Slackware 14
Posts: 242

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: It just works!
Cons: Lacks Gnome.


Installation is simple and straight forward. Once installed it just simply runs.
 
Old 01-01-2008, 06:31 PM   #23
sonichedgehog
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: Fedora Core 17
Posts: 296

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 7

Pros: Comprehensive without much configuring
Cons: Installing new apps!! Some skill needed.


Slack was by far the easiest distro to install even on my flaky machinery- just put the disk in & go. After that, I had a good system without much adjustment.

Trouble is, if you need extra apps, eg KmyMoney2 in this case, you need to read everything there is on the subject including LQ & Slackbook, then make sure you've read the README in the unzipped package- as that gives you chapter & verse which might differ from advice from other sources. A dedicated Linux user will probably think nothing of it, but if you don't intend to spend a fair bit of time expanding your skills you may be better off with a distro that does your new package shopping for you.
 
Old 01-14-2008, 02:37 AM   #24
drspock
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: slackware,pclinuxos,sabayon
Posts: 3

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Rock solid, fast, easy install,no media hype
Cons: You have to know how to read


I always install a fresh version of slack on one of my computers each year, just so I don't forget what real linux os is all about
 
Old 03-16-2008, 04:46 AM   #25
baal.daemon
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Distribution: Zenwalk 5.2
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Mean and lean...
Cons: Takes a little longer to set up than say Ubuntu or Fedora


If you want to really want to learn Linux - or have a fair knowledge of *nix operating systems, then Slackware is the distro of choice.

It doesn't have heavily patched kernels, doesn't include flaky programs that appear in one version then vanish in the next.

It will do everything you ask of it if you are prepared to put in that little extra.

What is there not to love?
 
Old 04-16-2008, 12:39 PM   #26
redjokerx
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 303

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Rock solid, fast, no magic
Cons: Initial setup can be a pain, no magic when you are being lazy.


Initial setup can be a pain... especially with more exotic hardware, but after that, the OS runs fast and solid.

I like the lack of auto-magical tools that hide problems from you. You always know what's going on in Slackware if you know where to look. You are always able to fix stuff without magic tools getting in your way.
 
Old 04-22-2008, 01:52 AM   #27
snakeapple
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: easy to use gratifying to use when you solve problems.
Cons:


very good. ive been having some minor problems, but i love slackware!!!
 
Old 04-29-2008, 04:06 PM   #28
Cuetzpallin
 
Registered: Feb 2008
Distribution: Slackware since 3.4 and love it!!!
Posts: 162

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, strong, secure, stable, flexible, powerful and configurable, you really learn linux.
Cons: a few of hard work toconfigure in some cases.


I'm a slackware user since 1997, I'm impress the way slackware works on old machines, and this release is not an exception.

I've a PIII 1GHz with 128Mb and works very well, of course I don't run any graphic environment on it, but Apache, PHP, MySql, a little firewall, etc.

For all the new users, I recommend only if you would like to learn, read, practice very hard and the most important, enjoy linux.

Cya guys
 
Old 05-28-2008, 03:01 PM   #29
aricshow
 
Registered: May 2008
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Simple, Secure, Powerful, Perfect!
Cons: Not stupidly user friendly like some OS's strive to be, so computer illiterate people should stay away


I am a big Slackware fan, it is simple and gives you what you need and not to much. I don't like how big it is to be honest, but it seems all operating systems are getting big today. I am a big fan of Slax, which is a small, live-cd, under 200 megs, Linux system with full KDE - based on Slackware. Personally I like how Slackware doesn't automatically boot the X server, because I usually just use the shell, and start X if I'm feeling lonely. =P

Slackware has to be the most complete operating system out there, it has everything you could need, and strives to be simple and secure.

I actually recommend to people (nerds) who want to start on Linux, to start with Slackware rather then say Ubuntu because it requires you to learn how the file system is organized, and how to use the shell properly. And then move onto the X server. And if they want, at that point to move on to a more streamlined OS, that is more then well, because then they have the knowledge they need if something goes wrong. On the other hand, if they are just wanting to try Linux out to get a feel for it, and not really wanting to become a 'power user' then I'm more then happy to point them in the direction of a more simpler OS, because this one is not for complete strangers to Linux.
 
Old 09-30-2008, 09:28 PM   #30
shammont
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 4

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: lightweight, solid, fast,
Cons: none really ... i just like it


I have a few machines running 12.0 or above. Servers and workstations. I tried Suse, Fedora, Red Hat, Centos, Ubuntu, etc. just to name a few. This is my pick.
 
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