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Slackware 11
Reviews Views Date of last review
51 780127 04-02-2008
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
94% of reviewers None indicated 9.4
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Description: Announcing Slackware Linux 11!

The first Slackware release more than a year in the making, this
edition of Slackware combines Slackware's legendary simplicity,
stability, and security with some of the latest advances in Linux
technology. Expect no less than the best Slackware yet.

Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you'll
find two of the most advanced desktop environments available today:
Xfce 4.2.3.2, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy
to use desktop environment, and KDE 3.5.4, the latest version of the
award-winning K Desktop Environment.

Slackware uses the 2.4.33.3 kernel bringing you advanced performance
features such as the ReiserFS journaling filesystem, SCSI and ATA RAID
volume support, SATA support, and kernel support for X DRI (the Direct
Rendering Interface) that brings high-speed hardware accelerated 3D
graphics to Linux. Additional kernels allow installing Slackware
using any of the journaling filesystems available for Linux, including
ext3, ReiserFS, IBM's JFS, and SGI's XFS. Slackware 11.0 also fully
supports the 2.6 kernel series, with your choice of the well-tested
2.6.17.13 kernel in /extra (including a version of this kernel that
supports multiple processors, multi-core CPUs, HyperThreading, and
about every other optimization available), or the recently released
2.6.18 kernel in /testing. This kernel also spent a long time in
development and in our own testing has proven to be fast, stable,
and reliable.

All of these kernels may be used with Slackware's CD/DVD based
installation system, and NFS network installs may be done using the
2.6.17.13 (huge26.s) kernel.

From the beginning, Slackware has offered a stable and secure Linux
distribution for UNIX veterans as well as an easy-to-use system for
beginners. Slackware includes everything you'll need to run a
powerful server or workstation. Each Slackware package follows the
setup and installation instructions from its author(s) as closely as
possible, offering you the most stable and easily expandable setup.

Here are some of the advanced features of Slackware 11.0:

- Runs the 2.4.33.3 version of the Linux kernel from ftp.kernel.org.
Special kernels were prepared to support hardware such as SCSI
controllers, SATA controllers, USB keyboards and mice, parallel-port
IDE devices, IBM PS/2 machines with the Microchannel bus, and even
speech synthesizers providing access to Linux for the visually
impaired community. The performance of the 2.4.x kernel series
along with Slackware's track record of careful attention to system
security make it the perfect choice for running your production
servers.

- As an alternate choice, Slackware 11.0 includes Linux 2.6.17.13
and 2.6.18 kernel source, kernel modules, and binary packages,
along with the mkinitrd tool and instructions on using it to
install the new kernel (see /boot/README.initrd). When running a
2.6 kernel, Slackware supports udev. This is a system for
creating devices in /dev dynamically, greatly reducing device
clutter and making it easy to see what devices are actually
present in the system. Udev probes for and enables hardware on
the system, much like the hotplug system does for a 2.4 kernel.

- System binaries are linked with the GNU C Library, version 2.3.6.
This version of glibc also has excellent compatibility with
existing binaries.

- X11R6.9.0 (same codebase as Modular X.Org 7.0.0)
This is the X.Org Foundation's X Window System. The 6.9.0 version
includes additional hardware support, functional enhancements, and
bug fixes compared with the 6.8.2 release that shipped in Slackware
10.2, and we're added additional support for some recent popular
Intel graphics chipsets.

- Installs gcc-3.4.6 as the default C, C++, Objective-C, Fortran-77,
and Ada 95 compiler.

- Support for fully encrypted network connections with OpenSSL,
OpenSSH, and GnuPG.

- Apache 1.3.37 web server with Dynamic Shared Object (DSO) support,
SSL, and PHP.

- PCMCIA, CardBus, and APM support for laptops. (pcmcia-cs-3.2.8
and pcmciautils-014). Slackware also now includes hotplug and
udev support. This locates and configures most hardware
automatically as it is added (or removed) from the system.
It also loads the kernel modules required by sound cards and
other hardware at boot time.

- New development tools, including Perl 5.8.8, Python 2.4.3,
Ruby 1.8.4, Subversion 1.4.0, and graphical tools like
Qt designer and KDevelop.

- Updated versions of the Slackware package management tools make it
easy to add, remove, upgrade, and make your own Slackware packages.
Package tracking makes it easy to upgrade from Slackware 10.2 to
Slackware 11.0 (see UPGRADE.TXT). The slackpkg tool in /extra can
also help update from an older version of Slackware to a newer one,
and keep your Slackware system up to date. In addition, the
slacktrack utility (in extra/) will help you build and maintain
your own packages.

- Web browsers galore! Includes KDE's Konqueror 3.5.4,
SeaMonkey 1.0.5 (this is the new replacement for the Mozilla
Suite), and the immensely popular Firefox 1.5.0.7, as well as
the Thunderbird 1.5.0.7 email and news client with advanced
junk mail filtering.

- The complete K Desktop Environment (KDE) version 3.5.4, including
the KOffice productivity suite, networking tools, GUI development
with KDevelop, multimedia tools (including the amazing Amarok
music player), the Konqueror web browser and file manager, dozens
of games and utilities, international language support, and more.

- A collection of GTK+ based applications including gaim-1.5.0,
gimp-2.2.13, gkrellm-2.2.9, gxine-0.5.7, xchat-2.6.6, xsane-0.991,
and pan-0.14.2.91.

- Large repository of extra software packages compiled and ready to
run. This includes various window managers, the K3b CD burning
application for KDE, the Java(TM) 2 Software Development Kit
Standard Edition, libsafe (advanced buffer overflow protection for
additional security), ISDN support, additional 802.11 drivers, and
much more (see the /extra directory).

- Many more improved and upgraded packages than we can list here. For
a complete list of core packages in Slackware 11.0, see this file:

ftp://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackwar...0/PACKAGES.TXT

- Another Slackware exclusive: Slackware's ZipSlack installation
option is the fastest, _easiest_ Linux installation ever. ZipSlack
provides a basic text-based Linux system as a 70 megabyte ZIP archive.
Simply unzip on any FAT or FAT32 partition, edit your boot partition
in the LINUX.BAT batch file, and you can be running Linux in less
than five minutes. The ZipSlack installation includes everything you
need to network with Linux (including Ethernet, token ring, and
PPP), and extend the system with additional software packages such as
X. A ZipSlack system will even fit on a 250MB Zip(TM) disk, so you
can carry a personal Linux system with you to run on any PC with a
250MB Zip(TM) drive.
Keywords: Slack tgz Slackware 11


Author
Post A Reply 
Old 02-18-2007, 11:26 PM   #1
Slack1_more
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0, 10.1, 11. and now 12!
Posts: 54

Rep: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Stable, fast, does not require special packaging for new applications
Cons: Requires a little knowledge of Linux



I started on Slackware with version 10.0, and went through the learning curve required to adapt it to my requirements (video resolution, scroll mouse, symmetric multiprocessing kernel etc.).
Then I tried other distros, and didn't like any of them. Some are great if you want to have the same control (basically) as in Windoze, whilst others got me really frustrated because using their GUI utilities told me nothing about what was going on, and I invariably got into trouble trying to fix some error or other.

I'm back with Slackware 11 now, and enjoying it a lot more. Oh, and there's also the Slackware community here at LinuxQuestions, it's by far the best of any distro IMHO.
 
Old 03-07-2007, 12:10 PM   #2
KeithE
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Distribution: Mint, Slackware
Posts: 88

Rep: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 1

Pros: I'll assume that it's pretty much the same as always
Cons: CD won't boot by older BIOSes


It may boot on newer PCs but they broke something on this version to the point where an older BIOS won't even see the first (bootable) CD in the drive (10.2 works perfectly in the same drive). This has been widely reported but seems to be restricted to older PCs.

Between this and the fact that there are few real differences between it and 10.2, I won't recommend Slackware 11 or later until this is fixed.
 
Old 03-19-2007, 01:28 AM   #3
GrapefruiTgirl
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: Slackware64
Posts: 7,594

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy installation, loads of docs available, super-configurable.
Cons: None, but a default 2.6 kernel will be nice when it comes.


Being new to Linux after ditching Windows, I thought I'd be trying Linux after Linux after Linux forever in search of one that 'fit' me. Not the case. I tried Ubuntu, Slackware, OpenLX, Gentoo, Absolute-Slack, Knoppix 5.1, in that approximate order, but Slackware 11 is simply the most comfortable, usable, stable, and inviting distribution I've found. Now it's the only one I have installed. As the saying goes, 'it just works.' Maybe the next release will have a Slackpkg/Swaret type package manager; that's all I could ask for.
I'm not done experimenting with others, but I've found 'my' Linux. Pat has done a great job keeping Slackware at the top.
 
Old 03-20-2007, 01:16 PM   #4
Carpe_Noctem
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Posts: 0

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Simple, fast, stable
Cons: None encountered yet


The lack of a graphical installer and package manager may turn some users off.
 
Old 03-20-2007, 05:13 PM   #5
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert.
I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Thanx to people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 05:58 PM   #6
Tonus
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Distribution: Slackware-current 2.6 ;-)
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: so much
Cons: addiction advisory needed


Nothing to add. Just say to those who are afraid : read the fucking manual
Slackware is quite fully documented. :D
 
Old 03-30-2007, 12:50 PM   #7
nemestrinus
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 19

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: simple, versatile and solidly reliable compared to other distros.
Cons: you gotta be willing to delve into linux and learn a little something.


Started with linux in 1996 and a friend recommended that I use Slackware. Had some difficulties with stuff like disk partitioning but with some study I got it working. Since then I have tried suse, gentoo, ubuntu, and fedora with the idea that they were supposed to be "easier," but I always ran into problems that I couldn't seem to correct without causing other problems or conflicts. Ultimately I have returned to Slackware, and with a little time and effort (and help from people on forum sites like this one,) I've been able to configure a slack system to fit my needs every time.

Recently I built a new machine with a dual-core 3Ghz processor and a 1tB RAID-5 array. Installed Slackware 11.0, then had to compile a 2.6.19 kernel to support my new ethernet card but that went smoothly. My new box is now hooked up to a T1 running a router and firewall for a small network-- providing a webserver, mail server, name server, radius server, file server and databases. Plus, I can of course still use it for desktop functions all at the same time.
 
Old 03-31-2007, 07:34 PM   #8
Peterjs
 
Registered: Oct 2006
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, Educating, Fast
Cons: Time consuming


Well the time consuming part of my review is close connected to the educational value of slackware, so it's not a real con just need to get mentioned, that slack can be a bit time consuming ;-)
 
Old 04-10-2007, 01:45 PM   #9
bioe007
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Distribution: archlinux
Posts: 654

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: cool name.. l33t status.. simple installer.. _outstanding community_ + super fast/stable/scalable
Cons: cool name... l33t status.. simple installer..


I've tried some others: FC, '_'ubuntu's, Gentoo, DSL, Zenwalk

the old saying is still true, if you want to learn a distro...

some people think slack to difficult, but its really not. You just have to be willing to do some reading and _ask_for_help from a great community of slackers.

But to 'optimize' your box its easier and faster to do with slackware than _anything_ else.
 
Old 04-14-2007, 01:21 AM   #10
peterec
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Posts: 1

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: fast
Cons: no gnome


Slackware is faster than Ubuntu on the same hardware and easy to install. After that, it just works, with all multimedia codecs installed.

However, it is a weird distro, with software packages lagging behind (kernel, LVM, xorg) and some tools are difficult to install (Kolab messaging server, FreeNX terminal server).
Also I miss gnome, and when using DroplineGnome basically is forked, with is not good for installing software.

If you want to know how fast:
in a terminal type: hdparm -tT /dev/hda
this measures harddisk and RAM speed. On same hardware Slackware is 25% faster than Ubuntu and Redhat.
or in X, bring up a terminal and type: glxgears
this shows how fast the graphical system is.
Slackware is 35% faster than Ubuntu and Redhat on same hardware.
 
Old 04-20-2007, 05:54 PM   #11
manwichmakesameal
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 800

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: No fluff, great stability, package management, no dependency hell
Cons: Not for the faint of heart (newbies)


I've been using Slack since about '99 or '00 because so many people said it was hard to use. It is now my sole OS, and will stay that way. I love the simplicity of the package management system. It just works, nothing fancy. One thing that does kinda bug me though is the fact that it comes with a 2.4 kernel by default (I know, huge2.6 is there). That's usually the first thing I have to change.
 
Old 04-21-2007, 10:00 PM   #12
Hern_28
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Distribution: Slackware 12.0, Gentoo, LFS, Debian, Kubuntu.
Posts: 906

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Great install
Cons: packages require lots of research on dependencies


love overall. highly customizable.
 
Old 05-11-2007, 10:56 PM   #13
compengrh
 
Registered: May 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 0

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: not cluttered, lets you do the customizing, Very stable
Cons: not recommended for users who don't want to learn Linux


I've been using Linux for 8 years and have tried many distros (All flavors of Red Hat, FC3-6, Mandrake, openSUSE, debian, ubuntu, lindows, centOS, linspire, gentoo, zenwalk, and of course slackware).
Now I have had slackware on my laptop for 4 years, and while my desktop has been more of an experiment tool with different distros, I always revert back to slackware.
Emerde is a great tool for "package management" in slackware as well. You won't be dissapointed!
(p.s. try xfce, fvwm2, or fluxbox... they are all good)
 
Old 05-14-2007, 11:55 AM   #14
SCerovec
 
Registered: Oct 2006
Distribution: Slackware and Porteus
Posts: 648

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Right to the core of the stuff
Cons: in front of time (CLI wil return again to mainstream...)


It bends your head right to the core of the system:
After install You go to /etc/ with mc and read and edit the files your up to...
No cruft, no kludge,...
By default You get the tools that matter most:
screen, mc, netwatch, iptraf ...
So once You get the server up and running, you have controll over it where ever You roam. The other distros, IMHO, prefer fancy features over important ones.
If there where no Slackware, we had to invent it for us. Thank You Mr. Patrick V. for Slack ;-)
 
Old 05-20-2007, 02:13 PM   #15
Southpaw76
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Distribution: Slackware-13
Posts: 146

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Solid, Stable, Secure, Uncluttered and highly customizable...
Cons: Still using the 2.4 series kernel and the installer needs improvement...


After having lived with Gentoo and FreeBSD for over two years I always seem to comeback to Slackware. I can use it for just about any situation. Slack has always been known to be a secure, fast and yet stable platform and this is definitely no exception. After having kept up with the "current" changelogs, I am very much looking forward to the next release (11.1), which I believe is going to be a bigger update. Hopefully Pat will finally do away with the 2.4 series kernel. I am however, looking very much forward to the overall tool chain update centered around GCC-3.4.6 moving to GCC-4.1.

However, Slackware gets better and better with every release, slow and gradual but always a rock solid distro. For anyone whom is interested in developing a better understanding for Linux in general I say Slackware is the way to go.
 
Old 05-21-2007, 03:33 AM   #16
AM33N
 
Registered: May 2007
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: What can i say ? Its perfect ( My opinion though )
Cons: Nothing till now



Well this is the very first linux distro Ive ever used. I got stuck to it immediately though Im still new to linux
Im still having problems with hardware installation (ex: usb Modem ) but then you have to learn to get what you want.
Ive read lots of linux book but I never made up my mind untill I ead about a forums that give me curious ideas about this distro.
Here I am trying to learn as much as i can about this great distro. I eally recommend it to anyone interested in linux. opinioun
 
Old 06-19-2007, 08:40 AM   #17
planoru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: slack 10.1/10.2 hybrid
Posts: 17

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: stable, fast, complete, costumizable
Cons: none


Once u start to understand it it will be really easy to configure and learn. In many other distros u can't see what your systems do.
 
Old 06-23-2007, 10:37 PM   #18
C-Sniper
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 507

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: exellent learning curve, good help online
Cons: none


as a first time linux user, i found that it was difficult to begin with, but after looking online and finding the first answers i found that this is a pretty easy to use. also the way this distro forces you to learn how to use the basics of linux. Also whenever i get stuck the online support is phenomenal.
 
Old 06-26-2007, 10:58 AM   #19
timsoft
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: slackware 13.1,13.37,14.0,14.1 64 and 32bit and arm
Posts: 120

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: no depenancy package problems like rpms
Cons: no 2.6 kernel by default


This is a good distribution for learning linux. All packages follow their defaults, so skills learnt are transferable. only startup,(/etc/rc.d) inetd and package management stuff different. Runs nice and quick with a latest kernel (2.6.21.5)
default kde desktop much quicker than before, this really shows up m$ 2003, xp or vista for speed.
I have several file servers running 24/7/365 and generally no problems.
mail server setup is the only non-trivial thing to setup - still working on it.
 
Old 06-26-2007, 05:28 PM   #20
Tailer
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 34

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: No bullshit
Cons:


straight to the point.
i'm using it for four years...
it's great. fast, express...
everything you could want from a linux, you get.
you do everything alone. installations, programming...
I love it.
 
Old 04-02-2008, 01:17 AM   #21
Doctorzongo
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Distribution: Fedora 11
Posts: 72

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 4

Pros: Easy to install
Cons: Package management is horrid, Buggy, Internet requires much configuration


Well, my experience with this distribution was awful.

Although, since so many other people like it, I possibly got a buggy iso.
 
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