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Slackware 10.2
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45 226657 01-12-2007
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98% of reviewers $24.95 9.5
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Description: Slackware 10.2 includes the Linux 2.4.31 kernel, with Linux 2.6.13 available in the /testing directory. For the first time, a 2.6 kernel with support for SCSI, RAID, and SATA is offered as a boot option in the installer (called "test26.s"). Slackware 10.2 also sports a new revision of glibc (2.3.5) with NPTL support for improved thread performance when using a kernel with NPTL support, the latest KDE 3.4.2 and XFce 4.2.2 desktop environments, updated development tools, and new additions like SASL support in sendmail, the Subversion version control system, the Firefox browser, and the Thunderbird email and news client.
Keywords: Slackware Slack Linux Best Distro 10.2 New Frugalware Rubix Ware


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Old 09-19-2005, 01:42 PM   #1
Anonymo
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: Slackware, Archlinux, CentOS
Posts: 184

Rep: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, Fast, Clean, Nice Looking [after tweaks]
Cons: KDE fonts looked bad [before tweaks], had to fix screen resolution, long boot time ???



Hardware:
Compaq Evo n800v [Notebook]
1.8 Ghz, 512 mb of RAM, 30GB HDD, 15 inch SVGA 1400x1050

I am not using Windows XP on the machine anymore.

The install went great. I went for a full install on Reiser FS with 3 partitions; swap, /, /home and running the 2.4 kernel and run KDE GUI.

The system works really well. All the programs open fast and nothing has crashed so far. The biggest thing that bothered me were the fonts. They looked hideous on LCD. I think this is a KDE problem. So I went on the forums to see how to resolve it and found this:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/answers.php?action=viewarticle&artid=397

I followed all the instructions and this fixed the problem. I was so happy with the results.

Another thing wrong is that my Intellimouse optical mouse doesn't work when plugged in. The laser turns on at boot time when linux detects it, but I can't do anything with it. The touchpad on the laptop works and I think that is what is screwing it up. I am still working on getting this to work. I guess I will have to edit my xorg.conf file again. The first time I configured it was to fix my resolution because it wouldn't go over 1024x768. I found out my H and V sync for my monitor [ HorizSync 31.5-90 VertRefresh 55-65] and then restarted X. This seemed to work well. Problem resolved.

The situation I am in now is that Slackware 10.2 works great, but I have to tweak it to make it boot faster.

Oh, I had to go back to the setup to make sure I had check the dhcp option so that it would have internet connection. Couldn't connect for a while. If you have/need dhcp, enable this module?? at install. Don't know how to do this after install yet.
 
Old 09-27-2005, 12:54 PM   #2
uopjohnson
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu, RHEL, OS X
Posts: 159

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Secure, fast, easy to configure
Cons: default uw-imap mail server


You can read a thousand previous posts about how great slackware is. I booked a whole afternoon to get my web/mail server up with a fresh 10.2 install (mainly for the sasl sendmail updates) and it only took me an hour or so to get everything just the way I like it.

The only con is the included UW-IMAP which seems way behind the curve. I plan to switch over to something else this weekend, however it is annoying.
 
Old 09-29-2005, 03:02 PM   #3
asciibaron
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: as pure a distro as they come
Cons: having to learn as you go


my first foray into the world of linux was back in 1999 with Mandrake 7.0. i have tried the various distros since then and always seemed to have a Mandrake version on my system. in Feb 2004 i put together a new workstation and turned the old system into a test server to hone my MS skills (gotta pay the mortgage).

last week i decided to revisit the top 5 distros as listed on Distrowatch to see how things are progessing after a long absence. the first install was Mandriva LE 2005, then Suse 9.1, ending with Slackware. Ubuntu didn't play nice with my hardware and the Fedora installer crashed 4 times before i gave up.

the Slackware install was marred by a simple error - i failed to select MBR as the location to install LILO - i quick fix and the system was booted. i like that the system doesn't start X by default. another welcome change was the lack of config wizards and survey bombs.

not having to configure my system before, i was a tad nervous poking around, but a few googles on some things got me going in the right direction. the other top distros take control of the system from the user and that is problematic for someone who is trying to learn more about linux and what makes it tick. i have never been able to get things to work in other distros after reading the man page on something - the other distros love messing with stuff.

setting up X was a no brainer and the only "hack" required was enabling the mouse wheel. i have 2 audio cards in my system (1 is a high-end digital card for music production). this caused a problem in that i had to manually set which card was the default for ALSA - card 0 is the Terratec and card 1 is the on-board Nvidia - a few minutes of looking for the right config file and it was fixed.

with 10.2, KDE 3.4 is the default system and there is no GNOME. i prefer KDE, so this was not something i am going to miss. there are several Slackware GNOME builds out there, so if you need GNOME, you can get it.

i really wish i had started with Slackware back in 1999, as this distro has allowed me to get a better handle on the operating system and how it works without added fluff that has been modified to do who knows what.

removing apps that i do not use is straight forward - simply run pkgtool and remove whatever you want. installing is as easy and not having to deal with RPM hell really makes things nice. just make sure you have a notepad handy to copy all the needed files down.

i only wish that my digital camera cf card and USB stick when inserted would auotmount and create an icon on the desktop. i'm sure i can get that working and once i do, i'll have the satisfaction of knowing i made it happen.

if you are just starting out, i can't express enough how much you will learn with this distro. if you want to install and go, Slackware is not for you, but with a little effort, you can get it configured quickly.

-da baron
 
Old 10-07-2005, 11:44 AM   #4
Erik_FL
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 801

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Reliable kernel, good documentation, user forums
Cons: KDE Desktop bugs, minor X-Windows issues


I've used a few different Unix systems, and one thing I like about Slackware is it stays very close to the way Unix works.

Slackware is good if you don't want a lot of extra baggage that tries to make the system look more Windows-like.

Slackware places very few restrictions on how you can configure your system, and you are free to customize pretty much anything. If you want a Linux distribution that installs and configures itself automatically, without you having to read the documentation, Slackware is probably not for you.

The documentation is complete, and the Slackware book provided plenty of information to get it installed and running. I had no problems installing Slackware, and had it up and running quickly.

There are lots of people using Slackware, and most of the issues I had were solved by going to the user forums. I found plenty of other Slackware users willing to help with advice, or even sometimes writing scripts.

One big benefit of Slackware is CUPS for printing. I was able to copy the ".ppd" file for my printer from the Windows driver, and get my printer working. The web browser interface for setting up and managing printers is also convenient.

If you are used to a graphical user interface, like I am, Slackware has a variety of choices. You can do everything from starting the GUI manually, to having a graphical login. You can also choose a bare-bones X-Windows environment, or do just about everything in the GUI with GNOME or KDE.

Here is where Linux has great advantages over Windows. In Windows, the GUI pretty much rules the system, and the command prompt is available as a GUI program. You can do that in Slackware, but you can also completely avoid starting the GUI and use Slackware strictly with a command-line interface.

Another very solid part of Slackware is the SAMBA software. I quickly had Slackware reading and sharing files with my Windows computers. In some respects I found it easier than setting the same thing up on Windows. Here I have to give credit to the people that spent time writing very thorough documentation.

Slackware supports a number of filesystems, which makes running multiple operating systems much easier. In addition to two Linux filesystems it supports FAT, FAT-32, and reading NTFS volumes. Some day I would like to see support for writing to NTFS. I am very thankful to all of the people who spent their time and effort to support NTFS in Linux.

My biggest problems have been with the KDE desktop. I can't tell if these problems are specific to Slackware, or just KDE in general. These are the three main problems. The KDE "Kicker" application crashes on log-out for various reasons. The "linux" font was missing, but that was easy to correct once I figured out how. The worst problem, that I still haven't solved is KDE refuses to create the help search index for KDE. I keep getting a "htdig failed" error. That is annoying, since I'm still trying to learn how to use KDE.

X-Windows has a few minor problems with the documentation about scripts that run at login. I wasted a lot of time before I found out that only ".xprofile" now runs when you use the graphical login for KDE. The X-Windows documentation still mentions "xinitrc" and "Xmodmap" which aren't always executed.

The mouse is another area where X-Windows has some problems. X-Windows refuses to recognize any mouse button codes with numbers higher than the codes in the "ZAxisMapping" option in "xorg.conf". The work around for that was kind of confusing to me, but I was able to solve the problem. From what I understand, not all Linux distributions have this problem, but I can't speak from experience.

Getting a sound card to work with Slackware was difficult for me. I think this is generally true of any Linux distribution. The ALSA drivers are very good, but the lack of industry standards for sound card hardware and features make the situation complicated. If sound card manufacturers will put more effort into supporting Linux, I think the situation will improve.

SATA disk drivers and RAID support is another area where Linux has some limitations. Again, this is due to the lack of standards for SATA, and RAID on ATA disks. There are quite a few SATA controllers, and some RAID controllers supported by Slackware, but also many that aren't.

Slackware isn't perfect, but it is an excellent choice for anyone wanting a hands-on version of Linux. Since my goal was learning more about Linux, Slackware was exactly what I needed.
 
Old 10-07-2005, 03:14 PM   #5
PastorFrederick
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
Posts: 12

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy Install. (Just put in the CD and follow the instructions)
Cons:


As a newbie I've been searching for a Distro that would support my hardware, be easy to install, and have a great desktop enviroment.

Slackware 10.2 is all of the above. I made a couple of stupid mistakes on the install, but once I understood what I was doing I could have had this distro installed in about 20 mins tops!
 
Old 10-08-2005, 04:33 PM   #6
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $24.95 | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert. I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Thanx to people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 10-15-2005, 06:00 AM   #7
plastik
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


 
Old 10-28-2005, 07:25 PM   #8
desertViking
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Distribution: Slackware 13, Arch Linux
Posts: 85

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Stable and reliable
Cons: I prefer grub, slackware likes lilo


I'd really like to take pages to discuss what I've learned with Slackware, but in the interest of time and space, I'll just say that I've learned a lot.

Slackware has obvious merits to experienced users, and those who are comfortable cruising around a terminal window. But, contrary to popular opinion, Slackware is also for newbies. Newbies that want to learn, to be certain, but newbies nonetheless.

The installation process went well. It picked up most of my hardware, everything except my wireless card which doesn't currently have native driver support. I did use another program for partitioning my hard drive, and also short-circuited things a bit by loading grub as my boot loader. All of those were my decisions, though, and Slackware just chugged merrily along.

The first workstation I installed Slackware on surprised me a bit by cheerfully logging me to a command line prompt. I'd been distro surfing, and this was the first time I'd been dropped of at this point, and thought I'd done something wrong. However, the Slackbook on-line explained what to do next, and before I knew it, I was on the internet learning more about configuring my Xwindows configuration.

Please, if you're new to Linux, spend a some time learning what's available to you in terms of on-line documentation: http://www.slackbook.org/

Many of the distros I tried satisfactorily got me this far. From this point on was where I really developed a loyalty to Slackware.

For all that is said about binary package installation, my experience has been much better with compiling packages my self. Downloading the source, running a couple of commands to build the package and create my *own* binary package is not hard. It's not. The last step was something that I learned from linuxquestions.org's Slackware forum. Installing the package this way leaves some nice bread crumbs to remove the package at some point if you want to.

Second piece of advice, check-out http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/forumdisplay.php?forumid=14

The people here have been helpful in my experience.

Regarding my wireless cards, building ndiswrapper and loading the drivers that way was painless on Slackware. Probably not the preferred method, but that's not a problem with this distro or Linux but with my card's manufacturer.

Finally, this point. With each step forward in Slackware, my experience has been that my workstations would hold up well and be incrementally improved by the functionality of a package I installed. I really can't say this for most of the other distributions I tried. It seemed like the more I tried to configure or add to them, the less stable the systems seemed to become.

The reliability and stability of Slackware was reassuring to this new user.

So for people starting out, give it a try. For those old hats, you already know the story.
 
Old 11-13-2005, 06:41 PM   #9
salviadud
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 [3.x]
Posts: 182

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, simple, what else do ya need?
Cons: none... haven't found any


I have used slackware since 10.0 and Im not very experienced in Linux compared to some members here at the boards. Still, since I'm using slackware, Im learning fast. First time I recompiled the kernel, I got a kernel panic message, and I thought I was doomed. Now I usually take about 2 recompiles to get what I want without much hassle...

Back to slackware 10.2, the difference with 10.1 and 10.2 is a bit minimal. Kinda like, from best to better than best. Slackware is an excellent distro, I have installed SuSE, Fedora Core, Mandrake (on other machines, never mine). And it just doesn't compare to the level of configurability that I can achieve with slack. I have experienced no real crashes (just the usual mad scientist super crash). It boots up real nice, and its great if you can do your own kernel. Im the kind of guy that likes compiling from source. Slackware 10.2 has checkinstall, slacktrack. Lots of flavors for packaging.

Slackware rocks! Once you go slack, you don't come back.
 
Old 11-20-2005, 09:45 PM   #10
Atmchicago
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 216

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Maintains simplicity, standards, fast, stable
Cons: To use it best requires willingness to learn, no 64-bit version


I have used Slackware for a few years now. The 10.2 release is just another set of updates and improvements on the previous releases. As with most Slackware releases, the underlying mechanics do not change much - most updates focus on newer versions of software, such as KDE and the Linux kernel.

Slackware uses a simple ncurses installation process. If you read the directions, it goes very smoothly. Upgrading Slackware can be done using swaret or slapt-get, and allows users to keep the system up-to-date.

The package management system uses the .tgz file extension. It is a compressed folder that is extracted to where it needs to be, allows for removing, installing, and upgrading. Slackware also supports converting RPMs to .tgzs. Most popular software packages are supported, and if they are not official packages then www.linuxpackages.net will likely have them. If all else fails, checkinstall can be used to easily compile from source and create a package.

For those who want 64bit support, Slackware is not 64bit. There is a 3rd party project to port it to 64bit, but it is not official.

Using Slackware is a pleasant experience. Once you get everything set up, little needs to be changed. It is stable and runs smoothly. One of the most often mentioned benefits of slackware is that it maintains simplicity and is not prone to dependency hell.

I give slackware a 9 and heartily recommend it!
 
Old 11-21-2005, 05:07 PM   #11
alien3456
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Learn as you go, gives you what you need
Cons: Not for the lazy


This is my first distrobution that I am sticking with. The first distrobution I tried was actually Slackware 10.1. I was frustrated with the install because I didn't know anything about it. Horrible to dive in and swim without learning about it a bit. Then I tried Fedora, Mandrake and Ubuntu because they gave me instant results. But then after using those, I was frustrated again because I knew nothing about the command line, and couldn't get much done besides use software. So I gave Slackware 10.2 some commitment. I read through the very friendly "SlackBook" as I was installing it. This time, the installation gave me absolutely no problems.

After I was up and running in the Fluxbox WM, (which is great for older computers; you really get the full speed) I was basically problem free. It didn't take long to learn how to make my own user-account. Then there were some things I didn't know how to change, like adding programs to the Fluxbox menu, why my scroll-wheel didn't work and why the sound was always muted by default. These, after some reading, were all easily fixed.

I think the next thing I did was install the new kernel. As a new user, I don't know the advantages of installing the latest one. But it can't hurt right? In my case, and I hope it's the same for everyone else; it was very painless. There is an article here on LQ that lead me through it. It didn't take much longer than typing a few lines and putting the 10.2-CD 2 in the tray. Very easy.

The only negative might be that sometimes people just want instant results. People coming from windows want to download things, click a few times and be up and running with them. Not always the case with Slackware. If you're installing something from source, you'll need to remember about 4 lines for the terminal. It's kind of intimidating at first, but once you have done it several times, it becomes just as easy as clicking a few times. You will eventually learn many more than just a few terminal commands, but it takes a while before you start to "get it" when you don't have a helping hand.

Overall, I think Slackware should be the only choice for a new user. I was coming into Linux with a very ignorant mindset, which gives bad expectations. I think new users need to realize that open source requires and open mind. I can guarantee you will learn something if you start with Slackware.
 
Old 11-22-2005, 02:01 AM   #12
zhizaki
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 31

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Makes me feel the same way I felt after watching "Hackers" the movie.
Cons: Nothing negative in my eyes.


I started on Slackware 7.1. Someone told me to install in a linux course I had taken, because I though I was better than everyone else at the material. While other classmates were on Redhat and Mandrake using the linuxconf, I had to learn how to edit various files and scripts by hand. For the first couple of weeks, I would stay up for 24+ hours to just exploring and hosing my system, reinstalling and reconfiguring, testing things and try new things.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 01:00 AM   #13
Lanix1
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Distribution: Slack
Posts: 19

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 7

Pros: Nice package tool, but so do all slacks.
Cons: More than a normal amount of configuration.


I have always enjoyed using slack, this version is no different. I like that it doesn't boot directly into a splash style login prompt. However many people will disagree with me on this. There is a lot of room for configuration, and you can chose something other than KDE or Gnome. With that being said though, I need a machine that has a good IDE with Java support. I am particularly looking for one that comes standard with Kdevelop. I know I can download it and configure it with every little thing I want. However I don't have the time, to sit down and play with something until it works. But this also means that Slack is a bit more streamlined than the others, maybe not as much as Vector, but still streamlined.
I would recommend this to someone who knows Linux, and has some time to get things just right.
 
Old 01-22-2006, 04:00 AM   #14
truthfatal
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: Raspbian, Debian, Slackware, OS X
Posts: 443

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Easy to install, and configure. Knowledgeable user base.
Cons: No longer packaged with GNOME.


Price you paid?: Slack Pack (Slackware Linux 10.2 & Slackware Essentials, 2nd Ed) -- $ 59.95

Hardware: ASUS K8N-E, AMD Sempron 2600+, MSI FX5200, 1024M PC3200 RAM, Sony DVD ROM, 200GB WD IDE HDD

Of all the distros I've tried, Slackware has taught me the most and been the most stable. I feel confident recomending Slackware to any curious, confident, and patient individual who wants to learn more about alternative operating systems.
 
Old 01-27-2006, 07:21 PM   #15
Automaton
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: fantastic learning tool, fast, powerful
Cons:


What can I say? I started using Linux at the beginning of the year. I tried Ubuntu, and while it's good for desktop work, I didn't really know what I was doing. Then I tried Slackware, and it's helped me in every way possible... this distro taught me how to use Linux because it didn't treat me like an idiot, and was transparent, with a bundle of software and a really easy to understand install. I'm still learnign to use Linux, but this distro ain't leaving my hard drive for some time to come!
 
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