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Slackware 10.1
Reviews Views Date of last review
48 221583 09-15-2005
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
96% of reviewers $25.00 9.1



Description: The first Slackware release of 2005, Slackware Linux 10.1 continues the long Slackware tradition of simplicity, stability, and security.

Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you'll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available today:
Xfce 4.2.0, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 3.3.2, the latest version of the award-winning K Desktop Environment. GNOME 2.6.1 with several upgrades and bug fixes compared with Slackware 10.0 is also included.
Keywords: slackware volkerding


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Old 02-21-2005, 05:06 PM   #1
Joey.Dale
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Distribution: Gentoo, Slackware
Posts: 828

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Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 6

Pros: Its slackware
Cons: The install



I tryed installing Slackware 10.1 on a customers server, and all went well utill I got to the lilo part and was unable to install it w/o making a boot disk.

-Joey
 
Old 02-21-2005, 09:52 PM   #2
sh1ft
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: Slackware, ubuntu
Posts: 391

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 8

Pros: Same positives as the previous releases.. not much is new
Cons: has some quirks


IMO not really as good as 10.0, sort of a stepping stone release until 11.

First release with unmaintained Gnome (same release as was included in 10.0), essentially just small version jumps in the apps, nothing new really. Because of Pat's sickness it is perhaps not as up to par as other releases.

Still does not deserve the _3_ the above reviewer posted o_O. Just because you had issues with some obscure server hardware in one aspect of the install that you hardly elaborated on does not make it a bad release :/.
 
Old 02-22-2005, 02:09 AM   #3
Artanicus
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo, Slackware
Posts: 827

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: It adheres to the slackware policy
Cons: nothing shockingly new


As noted by the other reviews, there are no big changes or groundshaking new features. Instead, the line of security, stability and ease of use, isnt broken and its as great as any slackware release.

In my opinion the best way to learn linux is the hard way, but slackware can teach you the same wihtout blowing your head off in the process.. (;

As the last argument id like to use the sentence I hear alot from slackware users: It just works.
That is a major difference to some distros on some hardware like mine.. Plain and simple, it does what you want, how you want an without a fuss..

In my opinion there is one great new feature in 10.1, tho its located in the extra directory. It has matured enough to be actually useful.. Slackpkg is a great installer for official slackware mirrors, and eases the package management hole left by the bugs in other popular programs like slapt-get and swaret.
 
Old 02-26-2005, 05:09 PM   #4
gargamel
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Slackware, SLAX, OpenSuSE
Posts: 1,585

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $29.99 | Rating: 9

Pros: Rock solid, stable, up-to-date, great support.
Cons: Could use more software packages and more flexible default setup for some packages


Slackware at its best, once again. Despite of his "medical vacation" Pat V. has done it again.

I had only a few minor hickups, getting this release working.

- Sound. My machine has an onboard sound chip and a PCI soundboard, and to use the latter I had to blacklist the onboard chip in the hotplug subsystem. Something which might be hard to fix for a beginner, and that wasn't a problem on some other distribution. Once you know the solution, it can be done in a few seconds, though.

- OpenOffice.org 1.1.x and above wouldn't install and work properly. Reason: OOo uses X11 DRI, and for that some access rights have to be set --- which weren't!!!

- X11 configuration could be simplified a lot without compromising the basic Slackware philosophy of being simple, clean and bare bones. The tools included with Xorg are rubbish --- all three. None of them produced anything useful on my machine. I then used SaX2 from SuSE and copied the resulting xorg.conf over to Slackware. Now my ATI Radeon 9200 works like a charm!
I'd never have been able to achieve the same optimisation as SaX2 by hand, and actually, although I want to expand my Linux/Unix knowledge, I am not interested, at all, in becoming an expert in X setup.

- The sendmail default setup is becoming questionable, as more and more email providers require SASL authentication (SMTP AUTH). Slackware's Sendmail is, unfortunately, compiled without SASL, and the Cyrus-SASL implementation is not included with the distribution. There are packages for Cyrus-SASL and Sendmail compiled with support for it available at linuxpackages.net, and there's a couple of great tutorials on LQ explaining how you can compile your own version of Sendmail with SASL support and how to configure it, but I found the Postfix package from linuxpackages.net much easier to setup.
I think this is the most severe disadvantage of Slackware. An MTA is a central component in most Linux systems, unless you don't even want to receive mail for the sysadmin. Compiling it yourself means that you have to take care for security yourself. As noone can be an expert in everything, I tend to depend on a distributor for taking care of security issues. I prefer "official" binaries, as it is easier to apply patches, then. No doubt: It all can be done by hand, but it is more work, and comes with bigger risks. In the case of Sendmail I really wouldn't be sure what I was doing, so I'd prefer someone else with better knowledge would do it for me --- preferably the distributor.

Thanks to kind assistance from the Slackware community and the maintainer I was able to fix all problems. And now I enjoy the latest stable releases of KDE and many other packages.

So it's not quite a 10, but a 9 is very good, I guess.

gargamel
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:56 AM   #5
BiafraRepublic
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 6

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Several issues addressed (mainly sound and modem issues) with 2.4.9 kernel, KDE 3.3, not many hiccups left on my old comp
Cons: Install still not for faint of heart..., User who gave it a 3 (WTF?!?)


Well the recent upgrade to 10.1, however slight, was well worth it. Even though it uses LILO, I eventually learned enough to get me up.

The packaged KDE is now version 3.3, which saves me from getting unsupported packages from kde.org. Gnome issues don't affect me much since I use KDE.

Also some hiccups with the old 2.6.7 kernel (sound issues) were cleared up in 2.6.9.

The only main complaint is the installer. I'll give it the fact that it's fast (probably some sort of curses-base), but still, installing it is not for novices
 
Old 03-08-2005, 05:50 PM   #6
JCdude2525
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Slackware/Fedora
Posts: 103

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, secure, good to learn linux with.
Cons: I'll tell you if I find any.


Hello all-
I just came by to post this review on Slackware 10.1. I've been a fan of Slackware since only 10, and it's my favorite Linux distro. I actually run Slackware 10.1 on servers and routers, that's how secure it is to me. I also use it on my desktop. It has every thing that you mainly need, KDE, Xfce, Mozilla, GCC, Apache, PHP, MySQL, Gaim, Gimp, Xchat, and more.

Even though Slackware doesn't have any GUI configuration programs, this is a great chance to learn to use the good old fashion shell to configure your system. Actually, you really don't need to configure it at all after the install, unless you have multiple CD-ROM drives or want sound to work. Just look it up on google or at slackware.com/book if you need to know.

I highly recommend Slackware to everybody.
 
Old 03-10-2005, 08:19 AM   #7
bigearsbilly
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: FreeBSD, Debian, Mint, Puppy
Posts: 3,269

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 8

Pros: network worked right off, nice and light.
Cons: none really, it's not for novices though.


This is my first time with slack.

I've always used SuSe but i figured it was time to do some learning of the bare bones of the linux system.
(I'm generally more interested in user space programming)

SuSe has always been fine. It generally works very well, configures hardware very well and introduced me to linux. Also a good thing about it is you get loads of packages to play with and get a good base knowledge of what's out there.

But, I thought I'd try a lighter more customizable distro. At the moment it's slack or freeBSD.

I like the curses install very much. It was over in a flash too.
I don't need SuSe/MS type pics. It's an OS install, I do it once a year at the most.

Nice though was: the internet connection worked straight away :)

The first thing I did was to compile a 2.6.10 kernel replacing the 2.4. This went fine lovely.

Had no sound trouble as I compiled the sound in anyway.

Haven't worked out how to get my usb-storage working though.

Haven't tried the CD burner either.


I disagree with the gargamel about X config. I had no trouble. just run xorgcfg -textmode and it worked ok.
It even had a basic VESA x config which worked out the box. (On a laptop!)

Also, annoying though it may be sometimes, Most people try slackware precisely because it makes you do a little work!
The idea is to learn.

X is worth spending a little time investigating. I've been the of the same opinion as gargamel about the rubbish tools, for years and years, why is X so hard to configure? but this time I actually spent just a couple of days study and feel a lot better about it now - it's actually not THAT complicated and quite interesting. (A good tip is to delete the Xorg.conf file and see what the bare one looks like from xorcfg, it's a whole lot simpler to read.)

I look at my SuSe X.conf and my new one now I've spent a little time reading up, and the difference is amazing!!! (about 10% the size)

tip: xorgcfg -textmode puts comments in an existing conf file, which you'll need to remove.


Overall very happy with Slack. It's doing what I wanted and is nice and clean compared to most.

Though, I am also testing FreeBSD which seems very nice, clean, light and integrated.

Overall, not for novices but nice.




 
Old 03-12-2005, 09:18 AM   #8
salviadud
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 [3.x]
Posts: 182

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: very stable, new libraries
Cons: tough to master, a bit slow on ugly computers :/


The first slack i've tried was 10.0 in february. I had never used a linux distribution, but I investigated well enough to know that slack was a great way to learn linux.

This review is for slack 10.1 so i'll try to integrate as much as possible. Most of my learning was done in slack 10, so 10.1 was no big problem. The installer is a bit hard, and I wanted to make my install a bit light, didn't want KDE, or GNOME, just XCFE.

I saw great improvement with the new GCC libraries, Im not sure why i couldn't compile mplayer on slack 10, but this time around it was a breeze.

I run an IBM thinkpad 600 with a 266 mhz pentium 2 mmx. What I feel is that slack doesn't suck up all the juice on my hardware unless it needs to. If I compile from terminal without loading X it's still pretty fast. The new X seems kind of sluggish on my system, that is my only complaint, but since this machine is the ugliest thing ever. I really can't complain, in fact I should praise slack. It breathes new life to this old laptop.

My conclusion, Slack rocks, but you gotta do your homework, slacker!
 
Old 03-14-2005, 11:17 AM   #9
Mathijs
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1 @ linux 2.6.18-g-r6
Posts: 50

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 8

Pros: Forces you to get to know Linux
Cons: Little introduction (like most distro's) to Linux & it"s commands


I love slack, it makes you think and got me to know linux better then any other distro I've tried (and that would be Mandrake and Redhat ;) so you can guess why... no offence though)

Go and try it...
 
Old 03-16-2005, 06:14 AM   #10
WoodLark
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: Slackware et. al.
Posts: 29

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $5.00 | Rating: 10

Pros: Produces a very "clean" version of linux
Cons: none noted yet


I have tried several versions of Linux including Mandrake, Debian, Libranet and FreeBSD (I know, technically BSD is not Linux!). To me Slackware gives the cleanest result and is easier to find things than in any of the others. Unlike the general consensus, I find nothing wrong with the install program; for me at least, it is easier to use than any of the others and it lets me install exactly what I want to (Mandrake drove me nuts because it installed a lot of extra crap I didn't need or want).
 
Old 03-17-2005, 03:22 PM   #11
michaelsanford
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Distribution: Slackware + Darwin (MacOS X)
Posts: 468

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: "Slack" will soon become a colloquialism for secure and stable
Cons: Upgrade scripts can be a bit daunting, inetd instead of xinetd


Being somewhere between a late notice and an early advanced linux system operator I can say that Slackware has been much more a rewarding experience than Red Hat 9 was.

I got to learn how linux /really/ works, from tty1, something that's relatively invisible to the Red Hat user running on tty7 with KDE out of the box.

Of course, setting up and starting a windowing system is dead easy with the few quasi-graphical scripts included with the distro.

10.1 didn't bring a heck of a lot of new stuff, but it brought enough for my to do a clean install and not worry too much about it (after mucking up the upgrade scripts--my fault I'm sure).

My only real complaint is that it still comes with inetd instead of the (IMHO) better xinetd, so I had to download and move all my configs from inetd to xinetd, though that's less of a pain than I'm making it sound.
 
Old 03-23-2005, 03:59 PM   #12
BenneJezzerette
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: Slackware 11 -current
Posts: 274

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Best Of Breed
Cons: None


Well this is my first review of this or any otehr Operating System / Shell

Slackware 10.1, yes I downloaded secral ISO' of several other Distributions. Debian, FreeBSD, SuSe Live CD 9.2, Knoppix Live CD 3.7, Gnoppix Live CD .99. And of course this one. Slackware 10.1. After tryingout all the others and Debian crashing on impact, FreeBSD turning my 30GB drive into a 528MB drive and the others just run of CD, I decided to go with Slackware.

Well first install was messy. Never really did a Linux Install so well yet with a few issues. No sound, my Printer would not even work and some othre things like a 1024x768 display is 16 bit color.

Also somehow the istall boot floppy was the only way to boot to Slackware but i got it up and running.

After a few crashes and reinstalls I have made the system so stable and only now get KDE Errors for some reason.

The reiserjs and jfs.s kernal is probably the only way I could ever have gotten this system to work. I tried all the others and no go.

The Learning curve here is about the same with some new things included. Not being a programmer, it makes me work just a bit harder to get things to work.

With a few tweaks and some hardware changes, namely a Printer Port removed and IRQ changed. Then I had sound, and through CUPS I have a printer. Other things that needed to be done, since I have a nice nVidia Video card downloaded the Linux drivers, and they crashed my system, so another install and flew right through it and was up and running in about 45 minutes. then found my Sony Display book, and ran the xorg.conf and setup the display and memory and then to my surprise in KDE I am now at 1280x1024, and 24bit color. The best it can do.

Personally this experiance has convinced me that I will stick with Linux and Slackware. Will never return to the M$ machine.

As soon as Slackware 10.2 is out, I am planning a Subscription for it and then will be a loyal Slackware user and also contributing to the BEST and most easilty installed Linux Distribution ever.
 
Old 04-01-2005, 05:34 AM   #13
dr.jupiter
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: slack 10.2, zenwalk
Posts: 15

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 5

Pros: has the sata.i kernel and is slackware
Cons: still haven't found any


Eventually i have found a slack with sata support so i don't care if it's hard to set it for your personal needs. I prefer it because it is more linux than other popular distros.
 
Old 04-02-2005, 02:34 AM   #14
ingvildr
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 358

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, Simple and Solid.
Cons: No 2.6 kernal as default


Now first off i've only been using linux for a few months, i had tried mandrake, Suse, fedora, Debian Sarge, and Ubuntu. But they all seemed too fragile, but through braking them alot i learned alot so i guess those distros are good starting points.
Anyway i always hear people going on about slack so i thought i would give it a go, took me about 3 tries to install but i knew what i had done wrong straight after so it was quite easy, you just have to read everything and go slowly. When it was finally installed i booted into my lovely slack 10.1 box and i notice i had a fair amount of software only missing Open Office. I like the speed slack gives me and the control so i would recommend this to anyone who wants a fast, stable and very usable linux box! :)

Keep slacking
 
Old 04-07-2005, 01:59 PM   #15
masonm
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Distribution: Slackware64 13.37 Android 4.0
Posts: 2,244

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, light, simple, everything works.
Cons: Can't think of any


Everything works. Simple as that. Clean and uncluttered/unbloated install of Linux.

Runs very nice and snappy.

All the hardware on my laptop is configured and working perfectly with no problems at all.
 
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