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Slackware 10.0
Reviews Views Date of last review
59 187261 07-09-2005
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
97% of reviewers $15.73 9.3



Description: This is the latest slackware version, released on June 23, 2004. It features GCC 3.3.4, X.org 6.7, Gnome 2.6.1, Mozilla 1.7, KDE 3.2.3. It uses the 2.4.26 kernel with an alternate 2.6.7 in /testing as well as GCC 3.4 in /testing.
Keywords: slackware 10 10.0 9.2 patrick


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Old 06-28-2004, 01:49 AM   #1
kittani
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 20

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $24.99 | Rating: 10

Pros: Clean as a whistle, very stable, and very up-to-date with security patches
Cons: Steep learning curve, Lack of GUI tools, Alot of .conf editing



To be non-standard I'll talk first about what I didn't like about the system.

Cons
------

Primarily the biggest con to the Slackware system, and it always has been, is the packages. There is still no dependency check, or other install scripts. You pretty much have to install everything if you don;t know what the dependencies for a given package are. This makes the install very bloated. It would help to have diffrent installation tagfiles already set up. This is of course more for the user than the developers to work out.

Another thing to note is the difficulty in getting the system to use alot of hardware. You have to edit several config files, and get a bunch of drivers. Other Distros can detect everything I have fine (and I have very standard stuff) I still have to manually configure my monitor, graphics card, and add scrolling to my mouse. Although I have a new Audigy sound card and it sees that fine.

Other than that there isn't any glaring problems with Slackware. Some scripts are different, but the rest of the system is about ad defacto-standard as it can be. another benefeit is that almost any package will compile flawlessly into slackware. It's so simple and straightforward to install from source it's scary.

Pros
-----

Stability is never an issue here. I don' know how Patrick and his team can keep a distro as up-to-date as his is without breaking it. I have run this system into the ground, compiled dozens of programs, re-did ALL of my key libraries from source... not a thing broke and I didn't even have to reboot once. I taxed this machine so hard that it would have killed my Windows test box in a heart beat. Slackware 10.0 is a 10 in the stability of it's core, and it's compiled in programs.

There is alot of fluff in the full install but nothing too far out there. 80% of the system is set up exactly the way an administrator would like it to be. By default the system is almost air tight. You also have arguably more control over the system than you normally would in another distribution.

All-in-all, the system works, is safe, and provided you know a little bit about linux, you can run forever without a re-boot. I wouldn't reccommend this system to a person that has never seen a command line before. I would recommend this to any business, person, or institution to use over Red-Hat or Suse, besides it's lower cost I have yet to find anything those other distributions offer that Slackware doesn't. granted you get stellar support for those systems... If you know what you are doing or are willing to learn the hard way... this one is 100 times better.

I am a fan of Slackware, it has a ways to go but it's worth waiting for. I have yet to find a Distribution better, and I have used over 30.
 
Old 07-01-2004, 01:53 AM   #2
vrln
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 235

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stablity, current software, simplicity, "it just works", simplistic package management
Cons: simplistic package management, not many binaries available


I just switched from debian and so far Iīm very impressed. Slackware is fast, stable and I have zero problems so far. Itīs definately not a good distro to start linux with, but once you have more experience it is a good choice. All the config files are exactly where they should be and there are no config managing gui:s that can mess up your system.

Slackware ships everything just the way the original developers meant it to be, for example KDE looks very different compared to heavily customized versions like in SuSE.

The BSD style init system takes some time to get used to but once you learn it, it feels quite good. Itīs extremely easy to use.

Package management is done manually with installpkg/removepkg/upgradepkg. This can be a good or a bad thing. Itīs propably quite difficult to break your system, but it can be tedious to install packages. If you donīt run current, then all you have to do is to (w)get and install the .pkg:s from a local mirrors patches directory There is are apt-get clones like swaret or slapt-get but Iīve never used them.

Slackware seems to be quite source friendly too, so far Iīve only encountered a single program that doesnīt compile (and it didnīt come with a configure script).
 
Old 07-02-2004, 03:15 PM   #3
busbarn
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 453

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Quick install and it just works, easy to build your own packages
Cons: swaret is not the default package manager, vi is default text editor


I am really enjoying the quickness of Slackware 10.0. I installed it on two old computers with pentium 2 processors. As I am most familiar with gentoo, the long compile times was not even an option. SO I downloaded the isos and got to work.

Installation was a breeze as I like a minimal install (See this post ).

Some people have complained about a lack of configuration tools, or lots of text editing. There are two tools: netconfig and xwmconfig that automagically configure your network and default window manager respectively.

"installpkg" is the default package management system, but I like swaret because it will download the packages and dependencies for you.

Finally, I like making my own packages. I tried arch for this reason, but wasted my time. While I understand computer stuff to a point, making ebuilds in gentoo seems way to complicated. I headed over to linux packages and read up on how to make your own package. It's quick and simple.

Slackware does have a steep learning curve, especially if you are new to vi ( here is a great guide to help you along).

I would suggest making packages or using installpkg or swaret for as much as possible, especially if you plan on uninstalling the package later on.
 
Old 07-09-2004, 07:33 PM   #4
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert. I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Thanx to people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 07-11-2004, 05:25 AM   #5
kickeroelves
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Posts: 8

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Clean & Stable
Cons: A wee bit more difficult than other distros **


Everything has already been said.

**The prime things you need to know about is:
1. fdisk
2. man pages
3. Online resources
4. Most important, patience to learn.

Slackware is the only distro that meets and in some ways exceeds compiling the whole thing from source.
 
Old 07-11-2004, 11:05 PM   #6
heema
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,528

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Fast , stable and it makes you learn the "CLI way"
Cons: Takes a while to get the hang of it


I tried alot of distros but slack has been the fastest one , and its the only one that didnt complain when i installed or updated new software as when i used mandrake 10 kde broke when i updated it .

It also has the best support as it has been here for a long while and the people that use slack are very helpful as they know its not an easy dirstro to use.

The only thing that i didnt like about it is that there are no GUI to help you out but that makes you learn how to solve your problem the basic way
 
Old 07-15-2004, 01:50 AM   #7
wartstew
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu, Debian, Maemo
Posts: 464

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 8

Pros: Simplified, but up-2-date distro that mostly
Cons: Hard to customize and/or update


I've been trying to learn Debian based distributions, but every time I come back to Slackware, I find it very refreshing. Slack-10 is the latest example. This review will be mostly a "compare and contrast" between Debian and Slackware. Since some of the design philosophies that exist in Debian also exist in other common Linux distributions, the format of this review should be useful to those experienced with other Linux distributions too.

Although it is rumored that most people use Slackware for production servers, I've been using it for a desktop OS for several years now with great success. Slackware always includes very up-to-date versions of GUI software such as X, KDE, Gnome, XFCE, Mozilla, various "office" and "multimedia" packages. Except for X (which must be mostly manually setup), everything "just works" out of the box. Another notorious exception to this is sound which is actually easy once you know to do a quick edit to /etc/rc.modules.

People comming over from the *BSD world will feel more at home with Slackware than with most other Linux distos (except perhaps Gentoo-Linux), because of similar configuration philosophies, and a somewhat *BSD-like init script structure. Just don't go looking for an organized "ports" tree. People looking for a "Linux Standards Base" compliant system should look elsewhere.

I consider the native software selection in Slackware a little small, mostly because I'm spoiled with having Debian-Unstable's software catalog of more than 15,000 titles, any of which can be quickly had via high-speed Internet using "apt-get" or it's nice "synaptic" GUI front end.

This brings up a commonly known downside to Slack: It's primitive package handling. This issue *is* being addressed however: Utilities like "slapt-get" and "swaret" attempt to mimic the similar, but more mature utilities found on Debian and newer RPM based distros. In practice however, expect problems when doing major upgrades. I have another machine I did an upgrade from Slack-9.1 to "Current" that was just a couple of weeks prior to the release of Slack-10. Although it mostly worked, there now many broken apps that I'll have to manually chase down depenancy problems with. My fresh install of Slack-10 works much better.

This isn't saying that Debian can always do major upgrades perfectly either, I sometimes have to read through install logs, and implore various "--force-things" flags to get things right. With Slackware, I have to go down to a lower level, like using "ldd", then chase down missing libraries to get things working again, I also have to do this more often than with a Debian upgrade.

The good news is whenever I set out to fix things with Slackware, either an upgrade gone bad, or a non-native package install that didn't work out, it always seems to turn out to be easier than I expected. Somehow brute-force file copying to their expected places and manually editing config files turns out to be easier than fighting with all the complicated mechanisms that the other (especially Debian) distro's have that are suppose to do all this for you and make your life easier. Debian has lots of little utilities that will do things like automatically rewrite your initrd when doing a kernal upgrade, automatically updating the menus in all your installed window managers when adding or deleting programs, to changing the default program choices (on a per user basis!) that you wish to use from the list of all installed "alternative" programs. I'm constantly finding others, like ones that automatically delete unwanted locale data after software install, and one that will hunt down "orphaned" library files and programs that are likely safe to delete. They are wonderful when they work, but a real pain when they don't. I spend a lot of time learning about these and others so I can (and usually successfully I might add) coax them into doing the right thing from then on. With Slackware, I have to keep notes, save /etc directories and keep re-configuring things after major upgrades, but in practice it isn't all that bad.

I don't know why people are always jumping on Slackware for having a poor installer. It works! It even works with unusual hardware combinations that those fancy graphical installers choke on. Okay, so it's text based (actually it's nice 3D ANSI-Graphics based using a "dialog" or "whiptail" engine like the old Redhat installer used to), but it clearly steps you through what you need to do, with one notable exception where it drops you into a shell and tells you to prepare a drive partition for the Linux install (I doubt many "newbies" make it past this point!). My biggest complaint with it is actually based back in the package manager deficiencies: You better not try to customize your installed software selection too much unless you really know what you are doing, the result will be a very crippled and unstable system.

This is one thing Debian does very well. Starting with a 100 meg "base install" you can easilly "apt-get" your way up to a specific and compact system that only contains what you use and where everything works. I've never been able to do this to my satisfaction with Slackware, but often starting with "zipslack" can help. That said, you haven't seen a poor installer unless you've tried Debian. I mostly have to invent my own install procedure based on what I am trying to do, the only good news is that the pieces are usually there to do it. No, I haven't tried the new "Sarge" installer yet, and yes I *love* Knoppix (it's Debian based) and often install (actually "clone" is a better word for it) it to a hard drive. It is just that I usually like to install directly from the Internet starting with as little as possible because I intend to upgrade to "Unstable" (which there is no installer for) anyway at my earliest opportunity then "grow" the system into what I want.

In summery: With my Slackware system I don't attempt to keep it up to date much, I simply occasionally do fresh installs from CD sets (sometimes purchased, sometimes downloaded), then mostly use it as is for the duration. This way It is always a stable and reliable system I can count on. With Debian, I'm always trying out the latest and greatest stuff with, or doing highly customized installs of. Sometimes one of my Debian systems gets totally "hosed", but unlike the evil empire's OS, where you have to wipe and re-install, I've always been able to repair it, usually with only advanced usage of their packaging tools.
 
Old 07-16-2004, 02:14 AM   #8
2mcm
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0, Gentoo ( no version )
Posts: 21

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Very clean .. just raw linux
Cons: non g33k ppl mite not like it.


I did however have a liitle problem with x.org (slackware s X server) but that sorted it self out in the end.

AND i get lots of .conf to edit !! :-) (really: i like editing them)

not to mention it runs on a 233Mhz lp to a 2.4Ghz desktop.
 
Old 07-16-2004, 09:04 PM   #9
C. nemoralis
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0, Yellow Dog 3.01
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable and Reliable, Fast, robust, clean design
Cons: None that I have encountered so far


I am a relatively new linux user. I came across Slackware when I decided to move to linux. I had an old laptop that ran Windows 98, and was too slow to run any new Windows software such as later releases of Powerpoint. Why not try linux, I asked myself, seeing as though it is free. Slackware was the easiest for me to download for free, so I went ahead with it.

I have read that it is not easy to install. I have not found that to be the case. I cannot compare it with other Linux distributions, such as Red Hat, which I also considered, but I found the install to be quite easy. I recommend downloading the ISO's. Configuring X requires some knowledge of your monitor and video card.

I do not find doing things like compling the kernel; setting up the modules; adding USB devices; and setting up the modem and wireless internet to be difficult. The manual pages usually answer my questions, in addition to reading forum postings.

The system is very stable, and I can go for weeks without rebooting; the only thing that I have had trouble with is a wireless internet card, which can bring the system down if I try certain things. The card is rather unusual, though, and I use ndiswrapper to get it to work.

I use my laptop for office applications and web surfing and email, using Openoffice and Firefox, and it is excellent for that purpose. KDE works very well, also.

I would strongly recommend Slackware to anyone wanting to switch to Linux from either Windows or the mac. When I get a job, I will buy it, even though it is available for free. Great job, Patrick and other Slack creators!
 
Old 07-22-2004, 03:00 PM   #10
Tinkster
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
Posts: 22,978

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Doesn't have a dependency checking packaging system. Fast. Robust. Plain.
Cons: users who wish it were different


Quite frankly, what Kittani (and some others) apparently consider a weakness is actually a strength. Slack's base packages work together,
and they do it well. As for the rest of things one wants: there are
situations where there CAN'T be a automagic resolution of problems,
and Slack helps you in being prepared for those situations. Other
distro's ween you into believing that all is sweet, but I've seen broken RH, SuSE, Mandrake, debian systems that died BECAUSE of their
attempts to automagically resolve dependencies. :} Never happened
to me with Slack! Go Patrick, and really, he should take swaret and co out of the extras ;}
 
Old 07-23-2004, 06:28 AM   #11
dphan
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Posts: 4

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: extreme simplicity and understandable, very stability, security and up2dated
Cons: 2 installation CDs, that s too much, just ONE is enough


Ever I ve seen a distro like it. beauty!
I strongly recommend this OS for even *nix newbie and all the rest. The upside of this one is BSD script, it is very understandable and easy to use. All in /etc/rc.d makes the admins more time for beer :-)
it is rocky to serve as server. Using puTTY to control slackBox on a linux or win client is absolutely cool
personally it eases to use rather than all the rest of distros..
give it a try. I love it - Thanks Pat!
 
Old 07-23-2004, 01:30 PM   #12
insyte
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware Current
Posts: 307

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: stable, total control
Cons: takes time to nurture


Well, compare to other distros I tried before, slack gives you the chance to actually learn something new. It doesn't try to automagically do anything for you, because you have to do everything for your system to work flawlessly. And its always a joy then you get something to work by changing something in a configuration file.

I love the simple package management of slack. It gives you absolute total control on what's on your system. By intalling .tgz packages, it's all too easy to uninstall too.

Also, there are great tools for package management such as checkinstall which is very helpful.

Well, I also like the feel of the non-graphical gui, I think keeping it simple really works. Besides who needs those graphical guis, hey as long as it works it's fine with me.

Well Slackware works for me, you just have to take the time to really know your system...
 
Old 07-23-2004, 02:17 PM   #13
yolopollo
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Distribution: Slackware 10.0
Posts: 14

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, everything just works, makes learn about linux
Cons: not for the lazy


Well, I've been a Slacker since 9.0 distro. Back then, I had trouble with the sound on my laptop, but That made me search for answers about how to configure my system. I've learned a lot since, and still learning more every day. With 10.0, ever since I installed it in my laptop, everything just worked fine!. I've been free from windows since.

 
Old 07-26-2004, 12:53 AM   #14
stabile007
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo
Posts: 74

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Simple and clean install system, Great way to learn linux, very clean linux distro
Cons: Most problems I ran into are generic issues


Ok first I wanted to try linux. So I tried redhat. very clumsy interface rpm's drove me mad, and the manuals were lik 400 pages long. Then I tried mandrake but it was too similar to redhat and I was a confused lil n00b. So then I eventually gave up. A year later I tried my hand at gentoo after wasting god knows how many hours and ink tanks and printer paper on printing 150-pages install manuals and supplements guides (albiet well written but the install takes forever) and only getting it to work onces out of my ten times trying I eventually decided to give slackware a shot after several people recommended it. I feared for the wrose. I mean if I couldn't even follow the gentoo guide what makes me think I can install the rumored to be hard to install slackware.

WELL PEOPLE ITS NOT THAT HARD! The hardest part in my opions were the fdisk part and the X windows set up. And frankly after running both a bajillion and a half times in the gentoo install I was a pro at them :-p I decided to install all packages accept for Gnome as I was planning on using KDE and then sat back and let it rip at it. Then I set up the boot loader once again a lil bit hard I guess if you are a total n00b but relatively straight foard once you get used to it. I sugest the expert mode as the auto mode seems a bit flakey. Everything else was pretty straight foward. And then I booted up and what a different worlf from redhat.

Shortly after I was able to learn linux by fixing my problems and even managed to do a succesful upgrade of my kernel thanks to help from this siye. Overall very impressive. Sure I have some issues but I will be fixing them in the up coming days and learning about linux. Definitly recommended to anyone who is serious about learning linux. Nothing is more refreshing then feeling like you put togetherr your own personalized OS. Oh did I mention the slackware install manual is like 4-6 pages long? Fortuantly I was able to print on the back of my many gentoo manuals to save on paper ;)
 
Old 07-27-2004, 05:05 AM   #15
Punkduplo
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Posts: 30

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: good support for hardware, fullpacked with the latest packages, stable, fast
Cons: installation, varius help chapters


This is the second dist i have used, the first one whas RedHat 9..

Pros: After installation alsa found my soundcard so i was spared that part of fiddeling around with alsa. I have a toshiba laptop so alot of the hardware is a bit rare and not the average most supprted stuff but with slack this time it found everthing exept my D-link wlan pcmcia card. But that was quickly fixed by installing ndiswrapper and it works like a charm..
It has most of the packages you need and all the other ones are very easy to install, either to compile or to install with the tgz or rpm package manager.
Once you get it up and running it is stable and fast... no doubt about it.

Cons: Installation could be magnificently simplyfied like for instance to compare with the redhat installation its back to the stoneage. But it works.. its not that it is dificult, even for a newbie like me but the user interface could be simplified alot. Another thing i noticed is that the help ist complete.. well it might be complete in there eyes but my advice is to turn to the internet when you need some guides or help.. LQ is a great place to start.

All in all i like it and am planning on keeping it.. I might hade som lack of experiance but i can clearly say it beats windows and it beats redhat...

 
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