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Slackware 10.0
Reviews Views Date of last review
59 188208 07-09-2005
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
97% of reviewers $15.73 9.3



Description: This is the latest slackware version, released on June 23, 2004. It features GCC 3.3.4, X.org 6.7, Gnome 2.6.1, Mozilla 1.7, KDE 3.2.3. It uses the 2.4.26 kernel with an alternate 2.6.7 in /testing as well as GCC 3.4 in /testing.
Keywords: slackware 10 10.0 9.2 patrick


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Old 06-28-2004, 01:49 AM   #1
kittani
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 20

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $24.99 | Rating: 10

Pros: Clean as a whistle, very stable, and very up-to-date with security patches
Cons: Steep learning curve, Lack of GUI tools, Alot of .conf editing



To be non-standard I'll talk first about what I didn't like about the system.

Cons
------

Primarily the biggest con to the Slackware system, and it always has been, is the packages. There is still no dependency check, or other install scripts. You pretty much have to install everything if you don;t know what the dependencies for a given package are. This makes the install very bloated. It would help to have diffrent installation tagfiles already set up. This is of course more for the user than the developers to work out.

Another thing to note is the difficulty in getting the system to use alot of hardware. You have to edit several config files, and get a bunch of drivers. Other Distros can detect everything I have fine (and I have very standard stuff) I still have to manually configure my monitor, graphics card, and add scrolling to my mouse. Although I have a new Audigy sound card and it sees that fine.

Other than that there isn't any glaring problems with Slackware. Some scripts are different, but the rest of the system is about ad defacto-standard as it can be. another benefeit is that almost any package will compile flawlessly into slackware. It's so simple and straightforward to install from source it's scary.

Pros
-----

Stability is never an issue here. I don' know how Patrick and his team can keep a distro as up-to-date as his is without breaking it. I have run this system into the ground, compiled dozens of programs, re-did ALL of my key libraries from source... not a thing broke and I didn't even have to reboot once. I taxed this machine so hard that it would have killed my Windows test box in a heart beat. Slackware 10.0 is a 10 in the stability of it's core, and it's compiled in programs.

There is alot of fluff in the full install but nothing too far out there. 80% of the system is set up exactly the way an administrator would like it to be. By default the system is almost air tight. You also have arguably more control over the system than you normally would in another distribution.

All-in-all, the system works, is safe, and provided you know a little bit about linux, you can run forever without a re-boot. I wouldn't reccommend this system to a person that has never seen a command line before. I would recommend this to any business, person, or institution to use over Red-Hat or Suse, besides it's lower cost I have yet to find anything those other distributions offer that Slackware doesn't. granted you get stellar support for those systems... If you know what you are doing or are willing to learn the hard way... this one is 100 times better.

I am a fan of Slackware, it has a ways to go but it's worth waiting for. I have yet to find a Distribution better, and I have used over 30.
 
Old 07-01-2004, 01:53 AM   #2
vrln
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 235

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stablity, current software, simplicity, "it just works", simplistic package management
Cons: simplistic package management, not many binaries available


I just switched from debian and so far Iīm very impressed. Slackware is fast, stable and I have zero problems so far. Itīs definately not a good distro to start linux with, but once you have more experience it is a good choice. All the config files are exactly where they should be and there are no config managing gui:s that can mess up your system.

Slackware ships everything just the way the original developers meant it to be, for example KDE looks very different compared to heavily customized versions like in SuSE.

The BSD style init system takes some time to get used to but once you learn it, it feels quite good. Itīs extremely easy to use.

Package management is done manually with installpkg/removepkg/upgradepkg. This can be a good or a bad thing. Itīs propably quite difficult to break your system, but it can be tedious to install packages. If you donīt run current, then all you have to do is to (w)get and install the .pkg:s from a local mirrors patches directory There is are apt-get clones like swaret or slapt-get but Iīve never used them.

Slackware seems to be quite source friendly too, so far Iīve only encountered a single program that doesnīt compile (and it didnīt come with a configure script).
 
Old 07-02-2004, 03:15 PM   #3
busbarn
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 453

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Quick install and it just works, easy to build your own packages
Cons: swaret is not the default package manager, vi is default text editor


I am really enjoying the quickness of Slackware 10.0. I installed it on two old computers with pentium 2 processors. As I am most familiar with gentoo, the long compile times was not even an option. SO I downloaded the isos and got to work.

Installation was a breeze as I like a minimal install (See this post ).

Some people have complained about a lack of configuration tools, or lots of text editing. There are two tools: netconfig and xwmconfig that automagically configure your network and default window manager respectively.

"installpkg" is the default package management system, but I like swaret because it will download the packages and dependencies for you.

Finally, I like making my own packages. I tried arch for this reason, but wasted my time. While I understand computer stuff to a point, making ebuilds in gentoo seems way to complicated. I headed over to linux packages and read up on how to make your own package. It's quick and simple.

Slackware does have a steep learning curve, especially if you are new to vi ( here is a great guide to help you along).

I would suggest making packages or using installpkg or swaret for as much as possible, especially if you plan on uninstalling the package later on.
 
Old 07-09-2004, 07:33 PM   #4
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bullshit. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use. I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug. The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick. On the Slackware site, you have The book, from which you can learn linux really fast. The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches. Slack leads you from newbie to expert. I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other linuxes). Well, please stop reading and just go for it.
P.S.: Thanx to people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 07-11-2004, 05:25 AM   #5
kickeroelves
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Posts: 8

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Clean & Stable
Cons: A wee bit more difficult than other distros **


Everything has already been said.

**The prime things you need to know about is:
1. fdisk
2. man pages
3. Online resources
4. Most important, patience to learn.

Slackware is the only distro that meets and in some ways exceeds compiling the whole thing from source.
 
Old 07-11-2004, 11:05 PM   #6
heema
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,528

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Fast , stable and it makes you learn the "CLI way"
Cons: Takes a while to get the hang of it


I tried alot of distros but slack has been the fastest one , and its the only one that didnt complain when i installed or updated new software as when i used mandrake 10 kde broke when i updated it .

It also has the best support as it has been here for a long while and the people that use slack are very helpful as they know its not an easy dirstro to use.

The only thing that i didnt like about it is that there are no GUI to help you out but that makes you learn how to solve your problem the basic way
 
Old 07-15-2004, 01:50 AM   #7
wartstew
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu, Debian, Maemo
Posts: 464

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 8

Pros: Simplified, but up-2-date distro that mostly
Cons: Hard to customize and/or update


I've been trying to learn Debian based distributions, but every time I come back to Slackware, I find it very refreshing. Slack-10 is the latest example. This review will be mostly a "compare and contrast" between Debian and Slackware. Since some of the design philosophies that exist in Debian also exist in other common Linux distributions, the format of this review should be useful to those experienced with other Linux distributions too.

Although it is rumored that most people use Slackware for production servers, I've been using it for a desktop OS for several years now with great success. Slackware always includes very up-to-date versions of GUI software such as X, KDE, Gnome, XFCE, Mozilla, various "office" and "multimedia" packages. Except for X (which must be mostly manually setup), everything "just works" out of the box. Another notorious exception to this is sound which is actually easy once you know to do a quick edit to /etc/rc.modules.

People comming over from the *BSD world will feel more at home with Slackware than with most other Linux distos (except perhaps Gentoo-Linux), because of similar configuration philosophies, and a somewhat *BSD-like init script structure. Just don't go looking for an organized "ports" tree. People looking for a "Linux Standards Base" compliant system should look elsewhere.

I consider the native software selection in Slackware a little small, mostly because I'm spoiled with having Debian-Unstable's software catalog of more than 15,000 titles, any of which can be quickly had via high-speed Internet using "apt-get" or it's nice "synaptic" GUI front end.

This brings up a commonly known downside to Slack: It's primitive package handling. This issue *is* being addressed however: Utilities like "slapt-get" and "swaret" attempt to mimic the similar, but more mature utilities found on Debian and newer RPM based distros. In practice however, expect problems when doing major upgrades. I have another machine I did an upgrade from Slack-9.1 to "Current" that was just a couple of weeks prior to the release of Slack-10. Although it mostly worked, there now many broken apps that I'll have to manually chase down depenancy problems with. My fresh install of Slack-10 works much better.

This isn't saying that Debian can always do major upgrades perfectly either, I sometimes have to read through install logs, and implore various "--force-things" flags to get things right. With Slackware, I have to go down to a lower level, like using "ldd", then chase down missing libraries to get things working again, I also have to do this more often than with a Debian upgrade.

The good news is whenever I set out to fix things with Slackware, either an upgrade gone bad, or a non-native package install that didn't work out, it always seems to turn out to be easier than I expected. Somehow brute-force file copying to their expected places and manually editing config files turns out to be easier than fighting with all the complicated mechanisms that the other (especially Debian) distro's have that are suppose to do all this for you and make your life easier. Debian has lots of little utilities that will do things like automatically rewrite your initrd when doing a kernal upgrade, automatically updating the menus in all your installed window managers when adding or deleting programs, to changing the default program choices (on a per user basis!) that you wish to use from the list of all installed "alternative" programs. I'm constantly finding others, like ones that automatically delete unwanted locale data after software install, and one that will hunt down "orphaned" library files and programs that are likely safe to delete. They are wonderful when they work, but a real pain when they don't. I spend a lot of time learning about these and others so I can (and usually successfully I might add) coax them into doing the right thing from then on. With Slackware, I have to keep notes, save /etc directories and keep re-configuring things after major upgrades, but in practice it isn't all that bad.

I don't know why people are always jumping on Slackware for having a poor installer. It works! It even works with unusual hardware combinations that those fancy graphical installers choke on. Okay, so it's text based (actually it's nice 3D ANSI-Graphics based using a "dialog" or "whiptail" engine like the old Redhat installer used to), but it clearly steps you through what you need to do, with one notable exception where it drops you into a shell and tells you to prepare a drive partition for the Linux install (I doubt many "newbies" make it past this point!). My biggest complaint with it is actually based back in the package manager deficiencies: You better not try to customize your installed software selection too much unless you really know what you are doing, the result will be a very crippled and unstable system.

This is one thing Debian does very well. Starting with a 100 meg "base install" you can easilly "apt-get" your way up to a specific and compact system that only contains what you use and where everything works. I've never been able to do this to my satisfaction with Slackware, but often starting with "zipslack" can help. That said, you haven't seen a poor installer unless you've tried Debian. I mostly have to invent my own install procedure based on what I am trying to do, the only good news is that the pieces are usually there to do it. No, I haven't tried the new "Sarge" installer yet, and yes I *love* Knoppix (it's Debian based) and often install (actually "clone" is a better word for it) it to a hard drive. It is just that I usually like to install directly from the Internet starting with as little as possible because I intend to upgrade to "Unstable" (which there is no installer for) anyway at my earliest opportunity then "grow" the system into what I want.

In summery: With my Slackware system I don't attempt to keep it up to date much, I simply occasionally do fresh installs from CD sets (sometimes purchased, sometimes downloaded), then mostly use it as is for the duration. This way It is always a stable and reliable system I can count on. With Debian, I'm always trying out the latest and greatest stuff with, or doing highly customized installs of. Sometimes one of my Debian systems gets totally "hosed", but unlike the evil empire's OS, where you have to wipe and re-install, I've always been able to repair it, usually with only advanced usage of their packaging tools.
 
Old 07-16-2004, 02:14 AM   #8
2mcm
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0, Gentoo ( no version )
Posts: 21

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Very clean .. just raw linux
Cons: non g33k ppl mite not like it.


I did however have a liitle problem with x.org (slackware s X server) but that sorted it self out in the end.

AND i get lots of .conf to edit !! :-) (really: i like editing them)

not to mention it runs on a 233Mhz lp to a 2.4Ghz desktop.
 
Old 07-16-2004, 09:04 PM   #9
C. nemoralis
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0, Yellow Dog 3.01
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable and Reliable, Fast, robust, clean design
Cons: None that I have encountered so far


I am a relatively new linux user. I came across Slackware when I decided to move to linux. I had an old laptop that ran Windows 98, and was too slow to run any new Windows software such as later releases of Powerpoint. Why not try linux, I asked myself, seeing as though it is free. Slackware was the easiest for me to download for free, so I went ahead with it.

I have read that it is not easy to install. I have not found that to be the case. I cannot compare it with other Linux distributions, such as Red Hat, which I also considered, but I found the install to be quite easy. I recommend downloading the ISO's. Configuring X requires some knowledge of your monitor and video card.

I do not find doing things like compling the kernel; setting up the modules; adding USB devices; and setting up the modem and wireless internet to be difficult. The manual pages usually answer my questions, in addition to reading forum postings.

The system is very stable, and I can go for weeks without rebooting; the only thing that I have had trouble with is a wireless internet card, which can bring the system down if I try certain things. The card is rather unusual, though, and I use ndiswrapper to get it to work.

I use my laptop for office applications and web surfing and email, using Openoffice and Firefox, and it is excellent for that purpose. KDE works very well, also.

I would strongly recommend Slackware to anyone wanting to switch to Linux from either Windows or the mac. When I get a job, I will buy it, even though it is available for free. Great job, Patrick and other Slack creators!
 
Old 07-22-2004, 03:00 PM   #10
Tinkster
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
Posts: 22,986

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Doesn't have a dependency checking packaging system. Fast. Robust. Plain.
Cons: users who wish it were different


Quite frankly, what Kittani (and some others) apparently consider a weakness is actually a strength. Slack's base packages work together,
and they do it well. As for the rest of things one wants: there are
situations where there CAN'T be a automagic resolution of problems,
and Slack helps you in being prepared for those situations. Other
distro's ween you into believing that all is sweet, but I've seen broken RH, SuSE, Mandrake, debian systems that died BECAUSE of their
attempts to automagically resolve dependencies. :} Never happened
to me with Slack! Go Patrick, and really, he should take swaret and co out of the extras ;}
 
Old 07-23-2004, 06:28 AM   #11
dphan
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Posts: 4

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: extreme simplicity and understandable, very stability, security and up2dated
Cons: 2 installation CDs, that s too much, just ONE is enough


Ever I ve seen a distro like it. beauty!
I strongly recommend this OS for even *nix newbie and all the rest. The upside of this one is BSD script, it is very understandable and easy to use. All in /etc/rc.d makes the admins more time for beer :-)
it is rocky to serve as server. Using puTTY to control slackBox on a linux or win client is absolutely cool
personally it eases to use rather than all the rest of distros..
give it a try. I love it - Thanks Pat!
 
Old 07-23-2004, 01:30 PM   #12
insyte
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware Current
Posts: 307

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: stable, total control
Cons: takes time to nurture


Well, compare to other distros I tried before, slack gives you the chance to actually learn something new. It doesn't try to automagically do anything for you, because you have to do everything for your system to work flawlessly. And its always a joy then you get something to work by changing something in a configuration file.

I love the simple package management of slack. It gives you absolute total control on what's on your system. By intalling .tgz packages, it's all too easy to uninstall too.

Also, there are great tools for package management such as checkinstall which is very helpful.

Well, I also like the feel of the non-graphical gui, I think keeping it simple really works. Besides who needs those graphical guis, hey as long as it works it's fine with me.

Well Slackware works for me, you just have to take the time to really know your system...
 
Old 07-23-2004, 02:17 PM   #13
yolopollo
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Distribution: Slackware 10.0
Posts: 14

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, everything just works, makes learn about linux
Cons: not for the lazy


Well, I've been a Slacker since 9.0 distro. Back then, I had trouble with the sound on my laptop, but That made me search for answers about how to configure my system. I've learned a lot since, and still learning more every day. With 10.0, ever since I installed it in my laptop, everything just worked fine!. I've been free from windows since.

 
Old 07-26-2004, 12:53 AM   #14
stabile007
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo
Posts: 74

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Simple and clean install system, Great way to learn linux, very clean linux distro
Cons: Most problems I ran into are generic issues


Ok first I wanted to try linux. So I tried redhat. very clumsy interface rpm's drove me mad, and the manuals were lik 400 pages long. Then I tried mandrake but it was too similar to redhat and I was a confused lil n00b. So then I eventually gave up. A year later I tried my hand at gentoo after wasting god knows how many hours and ink tanks and printer paper on printing 150-pages install manuals and supplements guides (albiet well written but the install takes forever) and only getting it to work onces out of my ten times trying I eventually decided to give slackware a shot after several people recommended it. I feared for the wrose. I mean if I couldn't even follow the gentoo guide what makes me think I can install the rumored to be hard to install slackware.

WELL PEOPLE ITS NOT THAT HARD! The hardest part in my opions were the fdisk part and the X windows set up. And frankly after running both a bajillion and a half times in the gentoo install I was a pro at them :-p I decided to install all packages accept for Gnome as I was planning on using KDE and then sat back and let it rip at it. Then I set up the boot loader once again a lil bit hard I guess if you are a total n00b but relatively straight foard once you get used to it. I sugest the expert mode as the auto mode seems a bit flakey. Everything else was pretty straight foward. And then I booted up and what a different worlf from redhat.

Shortly after I was able to learn linux by fixing my problems and even managed to do a succesful upgrade of my kernel thanks to help from this siye. Overall very impressive. Sure I have some issues but I will be fixing them in the up coming days and learning about linux. Definitly recommended to anyone who is serious about learning linux. Nothing is more refreshing then feeling like you put togetherr your own personalized OS. Oh did I mention the slackware install manual is like 4-6 pages long? Fortuantly I was able to print on the back of my many gentoo manuals to save on paper ;)
 
Old 07-27-2004, 05:05 AM   #15
Punkduplo
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Posts: 30

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: good support for hardware, fullpacked with the latest packages, stable, fast
Cons: installation, varius help chapters


This is the second dist i have used, the first one whas RedHat 9..

Pros: After installation alsa found my soundcard so i was spared that part of fiddeling around with alsa. I have a toshiba laptop so alot of the hardware is a bit rare and not the average most supprted stuff but with slack this time it found everthing exept my D-link wlan pcmcia card. But that was quickly fixed by installing ndiswrapper and it works like a charm..
It has most of the packages you need and all the other ones are very easy to install, either to compile or to install with the tgz or rpm package manager.
Once you get it up and running it is stable and fast... no doubt about it.

Cons: Installation could be magnificently simplyfied like for instance to compare with the redhat installation its back to the stoneage. But it works.. its not that it is dificult, even for a newbie like me but the user interface could be simplified alot. Another thing i noticed is that the help ist complete.. well it might be complete in there eyes but my advice is to turn to the internet when you need some guides or help.. LQ is a great place to start.

All in all i like it and am planning on keeping it.. I might hade som lack of experiance but i can clearly say it beats windows and it beats redhat...

 
Old 07-30-2004, 11:40 PM   #16
golan69
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Distribution: Yellow Dog 4.0.1
Posts: 56

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Sweet as he double hockey stix
Cons: time consuming



ive been a winblow user for some time now <let the flames begin> and have messed around with slack sevral times from 8.1 to the newest 10 and untill 10 i have never fully gotten into slackware much because of dificulties in understanding the linux os altogether
but after installing slack 10 and for the first time being able to recompile my kernel and install my nvidia video drivers im hooked i still have a crap load of learning to do but or only 4 days into slackware and being able to install and actualy run programs and such I F8ing love it
 
Old 08-06-2004, 08:03 PM   #17
mipia
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Debian, Mint, Slackware
Posts: 457

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: still feels like slackware, quick, simple, usable
Cons: it always depends on what kind of system your running


The past 2 years have changed my tasted as far as what OS I favor. I'm always looking for an operating system that I can install, configure, and use. THats all. Otherwise I want it to shut the hell up and let me do what I need to do.
I have been using Slackware for nearly 2 years now. Starting with 8 I went from totaly confused/disgusted/shamed to just plain content. Thats all, plain and simple. Of course with that mentality in mind there is nothing better than slackware for my system.
I was expecting some "newer and better than life itself" version update after keeping up with various forums, newsgroups, and chat-rooms aching to know when the next series would be officialy available for download.
Truth is that never happened. Slackware is nothing more than a kernel with some great application gift-wrapping. Thats why I love it. New versions of various apps, new shiney version number, and thats it. Nice and simple. Still works just as well as any version before so you can read discriptions and opinions therein. Otherwise its the same old slack. Brilliant!
If it aint broke, keep using it.
 
Old 08-09-2004, 09:40 PM   #18
ateam
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 32

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Customizable, fun, package system
Cons: Time consuming, package system, bloated


I've been using Slackware since version 7.1. After toying around with RedHat and Mandrake for about half a year, I felt comfortable enough with the Linux environment to switch to the Slack. Here's my two cents...

Pro's
Some people complan about there not being support for their harware in the default Slackware install. I'm a bit confused by that accusation, as I've never had problems with impossible solutions on any of the machines I've installed Slackware on. I'll go through both common tasks performed on computers these days and certain things exclusive to Slackware.

Sound - Every sound card I've ever owned and every sound card that machines I've installed Slackware on were supported. I simply looked through /etc/rc.d/rc.modules for the card I was using and uncommented the modprobe line. Recently, I've been using ALSA (http://www.alsa-project.org/), so I was very happy to see it preinstalled with version 10. All one needs to do is run 'alsaconf' as root. The program will detect your card and set it up, all you need to do is tell it 'Yes!' ALSA not only supports a wide variety of sound cards, but it brings MIDI support to Linux and even allows more than one resource to use the card.

Video - During previous Slackware experiences, I've either had to run 'xf86config' or go fetch my sticky note that had my monitor's sync settings in order to get X working. Slackware 10 uses X11R6 (xorg), available at http://www.x.org, replacing XFree86 for the first time. I did not have to edit the xorg config file, located at /etc/X11/xorg.conf, after Slackware 10 finished its installation. I simply ran 'startx' and watched as the default window manager started up without a problem! However, since my favorite window manager, Enlightenment (http://www.enlightenment.org) did not come with version 10, I had to download it and compile it myself. This wasn't too much of a problem, although I did have some troubles gerenating my menues. For me this wasn't a problem, since I had my menues backed up, though this may be a problem for first-timers trying out Enlightenment.

Aside from basic X functions, I had no issues at all installing the latest drivers from nVIDIA for my GeForce FX 5600XT. I get the same performace on this card as my friends do who have the same card and run Windows, so no worries there. nVIDIA has also recently released a Linux control tool for the first time. It allows you to modify settings just as the Windows control tool does. Both the driver and tool can be found at the nVIDIA website, http://www.nvidia.com. Oh, and those of you reading this review who like to play games, rest assured that Slackware 10 with the nVIDIA drivers is perfectly capable of running UT 2004, Quake III Arena and even windows games using WineX!

CD burning - CD burning has never been the least bit of a problem with me. You may need SCSI emulation enabled in order to get your CDRW drive to work. During the Slackware installation, it will prompt you about this. Chances are it will say something like, append="hdc=ide-scsi". I suggest you enable it, as you can always disable it by taking that italicized line out of /etc/lilo.conf and running `lilo` as root. There are Slackware packages for a wonderful CD burning application called K3b (http://k3b.sourceforge.net). K3b supports the creation of DVDs, "data" CDs, audio CDs and more. If you prefer, you can always use mkisofs and cdrecord.

DVD playback - This is a sinch. Mostly everyone is familiar with MPlayer for the playback of nearly everything, including DVDs, however, a better solution exists and its called Ogle (http://www.dtek.chalmers.se/groups/dvd). Ogle supports menu display, subtitles, language selection and everything else a home DVD player hooked up to your TV would support.

Gaming - As briefly mentioned in the video section, I am able to play UT 2004 and Quake III Arena along with my nVIDIA drivers. Slackware is just as compatible as any other distribution when it comes to playing games.

Package system - Although there are problems with the Slackware package system, which will be covered in the Con's section, I like it. Websites like http://www.slackcare.com and http://www.linuxpackages.net have tons of Slackware packages that can be installed easily from with a simple 'installpkg package_file.tgz' as root. When you first try to run your newly installed package, you may be presented with dependecy errors, which you can fix by downloading the libraries or programs the error specifies.

Customizable - Perhaps its just because of the large amount of experience I have with Slackware that I feel I can make it do anything I want. I feel 100% in charge when using Slack.

I believe that covers the Pro's. Now onto the Con's...

Con's
Of course, nothing is perfect. Let me reitterate.


Time consuming - Only because I know my hardware and have gone through Slackware installations and the installation of tons of applications under Slackware do I find keeping things in order so easy. A Slackware machine won't fail you, however, a newcomer to to Slack will likely have tons of questions. When I first migrated to Slackware, I spent many hours figuring out how everything worked, but I guarantee that if one learns their system, they will run into hardly any issues from then on.

Aside from getting things to work, problems are sometimes encountered while compiling applications that require certain versions of certain compilers. This is usually solvable my patching, so its not too big of a convern. Originally, in order to compile the VMWare network modules, I had to modify the source code for the modules. Strangley, after I reinstalled Slackware 10 (hard disk issues), my VMWare problem was nonexistant. Either way, errors will be encountered while compiling certain programs, its inevitable. For this reason, try to use Slackware packages as often as possible. They were compiled for your system (for the most part) and will fix any problems you had when compiling from source.

Package system - I spoke about the Pro's of the Slackware package system, however, there are many things its lacking when compared to Debian's apt-get or OpenBSD's package system. Debian uses a very nice system where it downloads the application or library you ask it to, automatically finding out what dependencies you're lacking and then asking you if you want to download and install those as well. It doesn't get much easier than that. To compare anything to apt-get is a bit unfair, so I'll move on to OpenBSD's package system. If you download an OpenBSD package and attempt to install it using pkg_add, one of two things can happen. The installation could either go smoothly and you can immediately begin using your application, or you will be given dependency errors. If the latter occurs, then you can simple pkg_add the dependencies and then install what you originally started with. With Slackware, you won't find out what you need until its already installed. Although you will be told what you need when trying to run it, OpenBSD is much smarter with its dependencies.

Bloated - This really annoys me. During the Slackware install, you can choose what you want to install, but it doesn't tell you what is needed for those applications, resulting in you having what you think is a working installation fialing due to dependencies. Often times, like my last Slackware 10 install for a friend, I simply selected 'Full,' resulting in a system with several different programs for window managing, text editing, etc.

All in all, Slackware 10 rocks. I don't suggest those brand new to Linux get into it right away, though I have seen some do just that. It more often than not results in confusion than a better understanding of how Linux works.

I apologize if I left anything out or made a mistake with anything. Please inform me if such is true.
 
Old 08-11-2004, 02:40 PM   #19
Genesee
 
Registered: Dec 2002
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 927

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stability, Speed, Simplicity
Cons: none


Can't add much to the excellent reviews above, other than to say I've never come across a knowledgeable user that didn't love slack. Stability and speed are very high, and Patrick does an excellent job of integrating and keeping packages current.

My recommendation to newbies is to try other distros and when you learn your way around, give slack a try.
 
Old 08-16-2004, 08:17 AM   #20
byvis
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Slackware v10.0
Posts: 3

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Fast, Easy, Stable, Up to date...
Cons: Good package management... After Debian I miss it :(


Well, what can I say. Almost everything as was said before. This distro rocks! After hard months of using Debian(woody), Slackware 10.0 was easy as 1+1. I've installed and configured my system in less than half an hour. It's fantastic! No, really, it is :-) Esspecially I liked, that it is only 4 cds. And you can install Slackware only with the first one and have almost every benefiths of OS. The installer is not pretty as a lot of users expects to see, but it's stable and easy to understand. The documentation placed on the www.slackware.org provides almost everything that a common user needs. In other words, someone really missguides newbie telling them that this OS is for advanced users :-). For a complete noob you can use KDE or Gnome(also comes with full documentation + easy and highly configurable GUI) and explore the benefiths of linux world. Ofcours I agree, for some, reading manuals, cfdisk'ing, xorgconfigure'ing, startx'ing is really difficult stuff, esspecially when everything is PROVIDED at www.slackware.org... :-)

IMO: Read it, Understand it, Do it! And you'll get amazed how easy is to learn linux :-)

Ofcours I'm not a guru, but not a complete newbie either. I'm just plain old user, who wants something more stable than Win... And guess what? I've got it and i'm very happy about it. For now i'm just waiting debian(sarge), which will let me to decide: Debian or Slackware best suits my needs. As for now... Slackware rules :-)

Happy slack'ing and may god bless you Patrick Volkerding :-)
 
Old 08-23-2004, 10:10 AM   #21
IceAxe18
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 5

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $7.96 | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, Stable, Secure, & Fun
Cons: -


I like this distribution because its easy to install & your up in no time.

You have plenty of programs to choose from within slackware. My favorite are Kstars, Apache (webserver), wordprocessing, netscape, GFTP, & XChat.

You can play the latest games.

I have set up Apache to have my home page on, so I wouldn't have to pay a host fee. Im only paying for a domain name. You could also use your IP address for your url instead of paying for a domain name, so then it wouldn't cost ya at all.

I have installed UT2004 & enjoy it very much.

I enjoy slackware very much. I would recommend this to anyone.

 
Old 08-23-2004, 11:07 PM   #22
nycace36
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: Debian-based, Slackware 10x+
Posts: 139

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Straighforward,Stable,
Cons: Not as slick an installer (for a n00b?) as other current distros


This Linux user goes way back to the old 3.0 version of Slackware. Had this on a system for a few years or so (back when 16mb sram was considered great for performance!), and then RedHat Linux distros came into vogue (versions 5.0 through 7.3).
Went back to Slackware as a backup distro at version 8.1 and now have 10.0 installed with 2.6.7 kernel loaded and running.

Agree pretty much with what others above wrote about Slackware. After going through the latest Debian installations, IMHO, the Slackware 10.0 installation is an incredible breeze! Has just what this user needs to be productive on a workstation or to set up a server as needed. Stability and security seem stronger then the majority of the bigtime distros, but could be made just a little bit more hardened by some standard security sysadmin work. An extra plus not mentioned much in other reviews is zipslack. Zipslack is Slackware's low-diskpace installation method for low-end hardware, e.g., laptops/desktops with no CD-ROM drives and questionable PCMCIA/PCI peripherals slots.

IMHO, having a very straightforward installation of a relatively few steps is an incredibly great thing. Sure, there is no handholding graphical installer with nice eye candy and good help screens like RedHat/Fedora, Mandrake, or SuSE, but then again, when one gets to their package lists, how does one know for certain what one should (or should not) install unless one knows exactly what is needed?? Patrick V's help docs on the Slackware install CD and the Slackware site's help are a good amount of documentation to review; not to mention the 'f' disk set and the initial Patrick V. e-mail messages every new install receives to help with this and other tasks. The number of packages and their organization into one and two-letter install disksets is very helpful. Debian's 2000+ package installation using dselect and its dependency-checking was a nightmare compared to Slackware's Advanced Install package 'setup'option! Slackware does not have the best dependenngcy-checking, as others above brought out, but using the standard Linux search tools and Slackware's 'pkgtool' and 'installpkg' (others mentioned things above too), this user has ALWAYS been able to install what is wanted and needed. No curious .rpm troubleshooting messages, as in past cases of RedHat installs and upgrades.

Now there are some good self-booting Linux distros reviewed elsewhere here which are very helpful for n00bies, e.g., Knoppix, DSL, Mephis, ...etc. Did not know about these when I 1st installed Slackware 3.0 w/ 1.3.x kernel.
Still, I give Slackware v10.0 a 10 rating!!
 
Old 08-24-2004, 06:56 PM   #23
max_sipos
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Posts: 96

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: stability, minimalism, ease of use
Cons: long time until you get it right


Some would say that it is hard for beginners, but I would disagree. I started my linux 'career' with slackware and felt great always. That makes my review of less value because I never took the time to check out another distribution. The things I like about slackware are:

- although the full installation is bloated, you can easily configure and install only the stuff you need. I find that slackware by default ships with the most of the stuff I use (they could add firefox, acrobat, thunderbird though). I like that I get a lot of development tools, tetex, etc..
- minimalism: it really means that it doesn't give you any fancy windows-like configuration editors (not that the most cruicial ones aren't there, easy clean install of network, sound, x etc). need to change anything, read a man page or two, edit the appropriate file and in the process you've learned a lot (and it didn't took that much time anyway).
 
Old 08-25-2004, 06:30 AM   #24
charlessmyth
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0
Posts: 7

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Very stable and unix like in its operation.
Cons: Package updating is quite difficult.


Slackware 10.0 is as stable as its precursor, 9.1, if not more so, and is now improved due to the updates for KDE and Gnome. KDE 3.2 has lost the previous bugs, and Gnome 2.6 runs much more quickly, and is now comparable to KDE.

A full installation is the simplest course of action to take, and any superfluous stuff can be be weeded out with pkgtool. This also means that you will probably have anything installed from the get go, that you are likely to need. My only additions were: Acrobat Reader 5.09, downloaded form adobe.com and easily installed from its install script. And Textmaker from Softmaker, to give me a good cross-platform DTP package. Textmaker is a commercial application, but is very modestly priced.

The most important thing to remember when installing Slackware - or any of the Unix like operating systems - is to install onto as clean a drive as possible. On previously installed drives, I always run Autoclave to overwrite any files. This saves so much hassle and disappointment. You can find Autoclave through Google. It’s bootable floppy utility and wipes everything.

In comparison to FreeBSD 5.x, Slackware offers a similar performance, and has the advantage of not needing a Linux emulation layer and another Linux box to copy Linux libraries from, to run applications which are not directly compiled - or likely to be - for FreeBSD.This includes Acrobat Reader and Easy Print Pro, for example. Printing is easily taken care of with CUPS and Gimp-Print, which are installed by default. FreeBSD - even in the commercial 4 disc set - only comes with CUPS and not Gimp-Print, needing the user to use the ports system to get the remaining and updated packages to even get printing up and running. If FreeBSD was distributed the same way as Slackware was - and there’s no good reason why it can’t be - a lot of annoyance would be avoided.

In conclusion: if you want a Unix like operating system which has good support, Slackware 10.0 is a good choice.
 
Old 08-25-2004, 06:55 AM   #25
johneb47
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware, ArchLinux
Posts: 19

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 9

Pros: Easiest Slackware distribution to install and configure.
Cons: In the downloaded isoimages scsi2.s and scsi3.s images failed to boot. This occurred on both installation disks.


I have been using Slackware since I first learnt about Linux and I purchased the book LINUX Configuration and Installation THIRD EDITION by Patrick Volkerding, Kevin Reichard, Eric Foster-Johnson. This book and LINUX IN PLAIN ENGLISH by Patrick Volkerding and Kevin Riechard have been the mainstay on which I have based all my Linux knowledge and learning. I have, over the years, built up quite a Linux library and I still constantly refer to these two books. I have not upgraded my sytem each time a new Slackware distribution was released although I have purchased the CDroms of most of the distros up until Version 7.0. After that I switched my internet connection to cable and that allowed me to download the distros from the internet.

I have just recently purchased a new system because with the software bloat of some of the necessary software, e.g. OpenOffice.org, Java, Mozilla and others, my previous system was showing its age.

I downloaded and burnt to Cd's all four iso images of Version 10.0
I installed this on my new system and by far it has been the easiest Slackware distribution to configure and install once I overcame my problems with scsi2.s and scsi3.s images. I recompiled the kernel for my configuration and everything worked fine.

I have installed the 2.6.7 kernel and associated packages from the testing directory on Install Disk2 and this works like a gem.

One reccomendation I would make and this applies to all Slackware distros.

NOT FOR NEWBIES unless they are prepared to do the hard yards and learn all about GNU/Linux.

NOT FOR THE COMPUTER ILLITERATE: use any other distribution but this one or stay with MS Windows which is designed and dumbed down for such people.
 
Old 08-25-2004, 03:52 PM   #26
ADS
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Posts: 14

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, simple, fast
Cons: Need to be comfortable editing config files


Fantastic distribution. I use it at home, and in the server room.
 
Old 09-14-2004, 04:27 AM   #27
slackie1000
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,037

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: stable, fast, hardware compatibility
Cons: package management, dependecy check tools


Agreed with most of the reviews. Just want to stress about the dependency stuff. Slackware does not have something like Yast or apt-get. Newbies that try slack and have no idea about software dependencies can mess a lot their OS. a good knowledge about Makefiles can be very useful if you want to learn slackware. the initial scripts are really well commented ( hats off for Pat V.) and easy to change. try to hack hotplug can increase a bit the performance of your boot.
 
Old 09-16-2004, 11:40 AM   #28
Slaxx
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy to install, configure, and use; very fast, efficient, and stable.
Cons:


This is the best Linux distro I've ever used. I've tried Fedora Cores 1 & 2, Debian 3.0r2, Knoppix 3.6, and briefly played with SuSE 9.1; but Slackware has always been the best.

The installation is a piece of cake and takes relatively little time to complete (about a half-hour). The setup program is all curses based, and assumes a little knowledge of how Linux works; but most people should have no problem using it. Also, most of the configuration that you need to do to get the system up and running is done during Setup, which saves some time and possible headaches later on.

Configuration is likewise easy - it only takes about a half-hour of configuration to get the system totally usable. There are two levels of configuration: one using curses (which occurs during setup and roughly configures your system) and one where you simply edit text files (for fine-tuning and tweaking your box). The curses configuration tools can be rerun at any time, in case you need some help in totally reconfiguring later on.

Another thing I really like about Slackware is how fast and stable it is. I have never had my box totally freeze on Slackware. I've had very few rogue processes that suddenly start eating memory or CPU time - and the two or three times that I have they've been easy to find and kill, without any real detriment to the system.

About the only thing that I'd say some people wouldn't like about Slackware is the configuration - it's not exactly a con, because I prefer having a basic configuration that I can tweak by writing directly to the configuration file, but some people would much rather have a graphical version.

All in all, I think Slackware is the best distribution ever - and the latest version is nothing different. It is simple to install, configure, and use; and is also very fast, efficient, and stable.
 
Old 10-01-2004, 05:20 PM   #29
xperiment
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 2

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 6

Pros: Great for the Geeks - fun trying to make EVERYTHING work, great performance
Cons: Bad for the noobs - long way to go to make this distro normal-user-friendly


I'm a big fan of Slack and have been waiting for a new release for soooo long. Well here it is and I'm starting to feel that we need more Slack developers. I wish I could just set aside the time to learn some C++ or C# so I could contribute, it has a lot of potential but has a VERY long way to go if it's ever going to appeal to desktop users. (I base my Linux reviews on how close the distro is to being able to replace Windoze - any good UNIX administrator can make it work as a server, a workstation, well that's another story.)

More cons - I imagine that when Xorg has been in there for a few more revisions, I won't have to worry about my ATI 9600 locking up when running OpenGL applications. Setting up my CD burner is waaay more trouble than it should be, I'm glad I don't have a DVD writer. I can live with the package management, but it really does need a facelift, and if I run swaret or slapt-get, the binaries start breaking things. I'm sure that this is mostly a dependancy issue, but still, it needs to be addressed.

More pros - fast as hell and compiled server apps run like a dream. I don't have to worry about editing the wrong config file, this is pure linux, these guys pretty much kept them all where they belong. There may be a lot to configure to be happy with the system, but it's so easy to find docs that will cover whatever it is you're trying to do. As I said, designed to run as a server, you're not going to find better performance anywhere else and if you have, please let me know.

All in all, I'm still happy with it, nothing gives me more satisfaction than finding a fix for something or learning something new because I had to fix it. Maybe someday I'll be able to contribute something useful, being a web designer and engineer, I can only help out with the more-popular-than-ever web interfaces. BTW, for those who's interest is in web services, I installed Slack X, running apache 2.0.52, tomcat 5.0.28, php 5.0.2 and mysql maxDB 7.5 in about an hour and they ALL run fast and flawlessly. No reboots - ever.

Keep it up the good work Slacksters! If I can help with anything, let me know...
 
Old 10-03-2004, 11:54 AM   #30
hylke
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Ubuntu 7.04
Posts: 329

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, very editable, fast, cool extra tools
Cons: You will need to use the shell much


I love it, because it's just really stable, its fast as hell(if you edit /etc/rc.d/rc.M and comment some serveses, it will boot even faster), it has cool tools(like pkgtool, upgradepkg, slapt-get).
But the only thing that might distract people is, that you need to use the command line a lot(which its a thing i like).
 
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