LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Reviews > Distributions > Ubuntu
User Name
Password

Notices

Search · Register · Submit New Review · Download your favorite Linux Distributions ·
 

Ubuntu 12.04
Reviews Views Date of last review
14 18727 01-08-2013
spacer
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
93% of reviewers $5.95 7.8



Description: "The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long-Term Support). Code-named 'Precise Pangolin', 12.04 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing a few new features and improving quality control. For PC users, Ubuntu 12.04 supports laptops, desktops, and netbooks with a unified look and feel based on an updated version of the desktop shell called 'Unity', which introduces 'Head-Up Display' search capabilities."
Keywords: Debian-based Long-Term-Support 'Precise Pangolin'


Author
Post A Reply 
Old 05-04-2012, 03:54 AM   #1
DavidMcCann
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 3,024

Rep: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? no | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 3

Pros:
Cons: Broken installer and weird desktop with no help available



As with Kubuntu, Lubuntu, and Xubuntu, the installer crashed with an unspecified “unrecoverable error”. In the live session, the first thing I ran was Help, to try to make sense of the Unity desktop. That crashed, and the crash-report tool told me that it was a known bug.

There are very few applications installed, although it’s difficult to be sure with a “menu” that displays 80 program icons in alphabetical order over 3 screens. Running from the command line, Firefox reported no problems, LibreOffice complained that it couldn’t find Java, and both Rhythmbox and Totem reported critical errors.

I could have downloaded and tested the media codecs, although my experience with Kubuntu, Lubuntu, and Xubuntu didn’t suggest I’d have much luck. I could have downloaded the alternative installation disk, which would have given me an installed system to tinker with. I could have tried to find documentation to replace the missing help. But I just didn’t see the point.
 
Old 05-05-2012, 10:06 PM   #2
enigma007
 
Registered: Jul 2011
Distribution: Ubuntu, PC linux and Mandriva
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Product is Free!!!
Cons: so far so good....I have no complaints.


Another great job developers!!! 12.04 installs smoothly and faster then 11.10. As with the others you have to know to go find and install synaptic manager and install it to get rid of any broken packages. I dual booted 12.04 with 11.10 and gave the hard drive to a friend. It updated smoothly and looking forward to installing google earth on it. HR block still doesnt make software to do my taxes so anymore thats the only reason why I use microsoft. I use linux 99 percent of the time now!!! Great job guys!!....ohh by the way I have already cloned 12.04 2 times on other hard drives with clonezilla....Its faster to clone it rather then installing from CD burned from the ISO each time.
 
Old 05-09-2012, 07:31 AM   #3
Steviepower
 
Registered: May 2010
Distribution: ubuntu/debian
Posts: 152

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: latest version and an LTS, up to date software and a lot of available software compared to other distro's
Cons: unity, less strict selection of licensed software in repositories


Ubuntu has replaced debian for me 2 years ago, there is a lot of software and online help available for it and especially since 12.04 it looks really slick. In terms of design it has passed windows a few versions ago and is now close to passing apple. With 12.04 Ubuntu seems more aimed at the regular computer user and less at the "12 o'clock flasher" or the real expert. With little knowledge on linux you can install ubuntu, the applications you need with the ubuntu software center. Then it works out of the box and without too much hassle you'll be able to do whatever you want. For some specific things that are not 100% supported you need to go deep to solve it though. But with every version of ubuntu this needs to be done less and less.

Naming unity as one of the cons needs some explanation, in my opinion the classic gnome layout is still better. However I do use unity and it has become way better! there are still some major issues such as that when using x2x the hiding of the unity bar is off. Next to this is software like firefox not completely open, the exactly same software with different branding iceweasel is. Ubuntu still uses firefox and some people might have moral/ethic issues with this(to windows user who also use ubuntu this should be no problem!)
 
Old 05-12-2012, 10:33 PM   #4
the_gripmaster
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: RHEL, CentOS, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu
Posts: 357

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: LTS (Long term support): five year of updates. Stable. Polished. Wide range of software in the bundled repos.
Cons: None


I have been a faithful Fedora user but needed something else because Fedora was getting in the way of doing everyday things when using it as a desktop, like installing the NVidia proprietary driver. I have switched to Ubuntu and everything is painless. Things like installing drivers should take minutes, not hours of googling through forums for a solution. The Ubuntu Software Center is great.

Now about Unity. I was using GNOME 3.x and moving to Unity 5.12 has made me more productive: it's simple and you don't miss important notifications, like when someone messages you in empathy. If Unity stands in your way, just give it a week, and stop hating it. I believe this way you will start liking it. And I love this Ubuntu font, IMO it's the most beautiful font out there.

BTW, I work at a online gambling company and Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS is our default OS of choice for our servers.
 
Old 05-24-2012, 10:07 PM   #5
addux
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.04, Debian Squeeze, Windows 7
Posts: 67

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Stylish, Ultra easy install, Fast, Stable, User friendly, bleeding edge of open source
Cons: Drifting away from the rest of the Open Source community


Ubuntu has come a long way. I used to be purely Debian, and although I appreciated Ubuntu's philosophy and relentless effort to improve, It never seemed to be quite as stable and reliable. These days, Ubuntu feels as fast and as stable, offering a complete, easy-on-the-eyes, bleeding edge open source experience.
It is worth mentioning that I have a very capable rig, so I haven't tested this version on lesser hardware, but I imagine it won't be all that great because it seems a bit more resource heavy. I will say Ubuntu 12.04 offers just about everything Debian does, and finally is as stable (sometimes I wonder if not a bit more stable).

In Ubuntu's strive to make itself more user friendly it seems the devs have realised you have to dumb it down. This time around it is more evident than ever. The new user interface is way to similar to Mac OSX, and unlinke most Open Source distro's it is not as easy to change out of the box. You can always install Xubuntu or Kubuntu which is great, but the default version is pretty locked down in comparison to, say, Debian. But not so locked down that it is unchangable. I don't like the new trend to install their own 'payware' that, again, isn't as easy as before to keep from starting up or uninstalling. EG: Ubuntu one and the fact that The Apps store or whatever its called defaults to a few payware apps when you search for software. However I am fully aware that businesses need to make money, so my only worry is the slippery slope concern, or where it will go from here. Will they begin to push more and more of there own stuff? Or will this be it. Either case they have to make money, so I am really on the fence about this. And besides this is a great version of Ubuntu and I like Ubuntu One.
 
Old 05-31-2012, 08:44 PM   #6
Steve R.
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Distribution: Ubuntu 14.04
Posts: 217

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros:
Cons: Aggressive Upgrade Cycle and Ever Changing User Inferface


I have NOT yet fully migrated to Ubuntu. The agressive upgrade cycle has made it difficult to adapt to the new version. Addtionally, some of the features that I use, while still there have been "disapeared"; so you have to go find them again. (Synaptic, Terminal, and the graphical interface for managing groups.)

Ubuntu also seems to be slowly adding content that points to commercial products. Since Ubuntu is free, I can't really complain; but it makes me question the future.

Overall, I have been very pleased with Ubuntu. I hope that they will slow down the upgrade cycle and settle on a long-term consistent user interface.
 
Old 06-13-2012, 11:57 AM   #7
Leo-duke
 
Registered: Apr 2012
Distribution: Mint Maya Cinnamon
Posts: 8

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0

Pros: Easily installed, works out of the box
Cons: Issues with second monitor, wireless networking


Having been most impressed with 11.04 and then 11.10, particularly the way they recognised and worked with my printers, I installed 12.04 on my spare (new) laptop. I was disappointed not to be able to identify my external monitor, but everything else seems to work well. Wired broadband worked on connection but I have had no success using a wireless system (yet).
The important thing about operating systems is that as a user I shouldn't even notice them. With this version I don't and my mature students love it. Getting them to ditch Windows is now just a matter of showing them the system working. All in all, a really clean workmanlike package.
 
Old 06-23-2012, 05:53 AM   #8
sriramdas
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Distribution: Ubuntu, CentOS, Opensolaris, Fedora 13
Posts: 44

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros:
Cons:


Great work guys...!!

It was working really great.. Certainly faster than Ubuntu 11.04.

But was forced to uninstall due to continuous errors coming in Software Centre...

Am getting Continous parse errors form different files each time i try to open software centre..

Please help..!!

For now i went back to ubuntu 11.04.. :(

Thanks,
Sriram A Das
 
Old 07-03-2012, 12:50 AM   #9
lashturner
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Distribution: fedora9, ubuntu, gos.
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: A novice can use it with not too much difficulty
Cons: Propriotary software


I installed this on New hybrid drive that I replaced in laptop that I bought in 2009. Couple of problems are 1 couldnt get google earth to run. I must be doing something wrong. only other problem is With playing DVDs that are store bought and decoding. What I fail to understand is if I buy a dvd player why do I have to buy software to make prerecorded DVDs play?
 
Old 08-07-2012, 10:32 PM   #10
jk07
 
Registered: Jul 2012
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Kubuntu 12.04 LTS, Scientific Linux 6.3
Posts: 97

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $5.95 | Rating: 6

Pros: Excellent for those new to Linux, excellent support forums
Cons: Many updates each week, no dial-up support, Unity


I will soon have been using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS for two months so now I think I have developed a feel for it. I have used Linux off and on for over 10 years, and in that time I have used mostly Suse and OpenSuse.

My initial reaction was that Ubuntu was very easy to install from the live CD and everything just worked out of the box. The only word of caution I have about the installation is that it is all too easy to wipe out your entire hard disk including and especially Microsoft Windows. I wanted to get rid of my Microsoft Windows, but I realized how easy it would be to do it inadvertently.

The installation was very quick which was somewhat disquieting for me since I'm used to being given the opportunity to review the hardware detection and also to select the packages which I wanted installed. I did not have those choices with Ubuntu.

... Then I logged in. I can only say that coming from a KDE background, the default desktop environment "Unity" came as quite a shock. It was as if my computer morphed into a giant smartphone. I know that there are those who like Unity, and if it works for you then great. But I wasted no time in installing the Gnome desktop and the Xubuntu desktop (Xfce).

The other thing that I do not like about Ubuntu is how the developers play "hide the ball" with root access. The root password is disabled by default, and it is certainly not encouraged to set one. Coming from Suse, this was a big issue for me because I was used to being root on my own system. (And no, I didn't use my root account to surf the web or listen to music.)

There are a few other things that bother me. One is the Software Center. It is too much like iTunes and the Apple App Store if you ask me. This is, of course, keeping with the theme of a giant smartphone. Another thing that bothers me is the daily updates. I mean, I thought Microsoft put out a lot of updates, but wow ... Ubuntu is over the top. I connect to the internet through a dial-up connection, and there is no way that I can perform so many updates. Which leads me into the another thing that troubles me about Ubuntu: There is no out-of-the-box provision for dial-up. Apparently, once upon a time in another LTS version, the network manager had a provision for modem configuration, but that functionality was removed in 12.04.

Ubuntu gives one the feeling of an OS that is so polished that it inserts a layer of insulation between the user and the computer. There is something very Microsoft-esque about it. It's just the feeling I get when using it.

So what about Ubuntu do I like? I like that most things just work out of the box. I like the concept of Long Term Support (LTS) so that I don't have to upgrade every year or so. I like the amazingly large amount of software in the repositories. I like that there are work-arounds for many of the problems I highlighted above (possible to set root password, Gnome PPP for dial-up, and apt to install software).

I put that I would recommend Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, but I want to qualify that. I believe that this distribution is perfect for newcomers to Linux. And you can't get better support than the support on the Ubuntu forums and ask Ubuntu without paying for it. I would without hesitation recommend Ubuntu to beginners because it just works and because of the support. But for intermediate or advanced users, I really couldn't recommend it.
 
Old 08-10-2012, 04:38 AM   #11
salim47
 
Registered: Aug 2012
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0

Pros:
Cons:


every body who has linux have to install backtrack5 r3 which is going to release after 2 weeks.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 03:06 AM   #12
oakridge
 
Registered: Jan 2012
Distribution: Mandrake/Mandriva for about 8 years and Ubuntu, 2012 onwards
Posts: 12

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Innovative and well designed user interface and I like the regular updates.
Cons: Quite a lot of problem prompts.


I moved to Ubuntu at the beginning of this year when Mandriva, which I had used for about 10 years seemed to go into terminal decline. I found Ubuntu refreshing and easy to use. Three of us work from home and it is our file server which it provides with quiet efficiency.
 
Old 09-05-2012, 03:26 AM   #13
trevox
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Very straightforward installation. Competitor to OSX Lion.
Cons:


Relationships are strongly influenced by initial perceptions. The default desktop is the initial perception of an operating system and, like many, I dislike change for the sake of it. I'm most comfortable with the Gnome desktop having used it for numerous computers since Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). The Unity desktop on an 11.04 installation lasted under an hour before it was replaced with Gnome.

When in August 2012 it became clear that "my" Ubuntu installations needed upgrading, I reflected on recent exposure to new Microsoft and Apple systems and decided to give Unity another go in Ubuntu 12.04. I'm glad I did. It seems much improved since 11.04, at least as intuitive as OSX Lion and way easier to navigate than Windows 7. Early days yet, but my intent is to stick with Unity, as I can the reasoning behind having the same interface for tablet, palm and desktop computers.

12.04 installed readily on all but one machine I tried it on (an elderly Fujitsu Scenic with 512Mb RAM, on which the initial load from CD never finished). I'm still not sure about the switch to LibreOffice from OpenOffice in Ubuntu distributions, thinking that the forking of a great productivity suite was premature and unnecessary, but it does the job well. Firefox performed admirably, as usual. The Software Centre lists everything else I regularly use.

Ubuntu remains my o/s of choice.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 12:12 AM   #14
trijit
 
Registered: Sep 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 34

Rep: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Good and fast
Cons: unity


12.04 with cinnamon is a deadly combination working for me :)
 




  



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:53 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement

My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration