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Slackware Linux 13.37
Reviews Views Date of last review
34 107302 11-19-2012
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $44.97 9.6



Description: "It's true! Slackware 13.37 has been released. Nearly a year in the making, you will appreciate the performance and stability that can only come with careful and rigorous testing. Slackware 13.37 uses the 2.6.37.6 Linux kernel and also ships with 2.6.38.4 kernels for those who want to run the latest. The long-awaited Firefox 4.0 web browser is included, the X Window System has been upgraded (and includes the open source nouveau driver for NVIDIA cards). The venerable Slackware installer has been improved as well, with support for installing to btrfs, a one-package-per-line display mode option, and an easy to set-up PXE install server that runs right off the DVD!"
Keywords: kernel-2.6.37.6 Firefox-4.0 btrfs-support


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Old 05-28-2011, 05:33 PM   #1
NickJB61
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Distribution: Linux Mint Debian (Netbook) & Slackware 13.37 64bit (Desktop)
Posts: 3

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: It is Slackware (no need to say more)
Cons: I still miss Gnome



I have just installed the latest version on my desktop machine (which isn't a state-of-the-art machine by any means.) Had to install wicd from the extra directory to get my wireless network going but everything else is working fine. It looks good, it works, it don't patronise you like other distros, I love it.
 
Old 06-07-2011, 04:04 AM   #2
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $49.95 | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure Linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bulls**t. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use.
I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug.
The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick.
On the Slackware site, you have The Book, from which you can learn Linux really fast.
The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches.
A LOT of packages at http://slackbuilds.org/

Slack leads you from newbie to expert :
I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other Linuxes).
Well, please stop reading and just go for it.

P.S.: Big thanx to Patrick Volkerding and all other people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 06-07-2011, 08:07 AM   #3
beder
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Posts: 82

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Highly stable, tons of features out of the box
Cons: Unless you have a HD space limitation, there's none


Back on the years 00's, I was introduced to Linux by one of those old magazines, on which there was a Mandrake install cd. I installed it, and didn't thought much of it. A while later, while talking with a friend, he introduced me to Slackware, and the Slackware KISS philosophy, and how things "just worked". I would reinstall the system multiple times just for the sakes of it, configure the ALSA drivers, make the damn WinModem work, and have mplayer play the first Matrix directly from the shell.
It was a fun time, and it was an awesome introduction to that phenomenal distro that Slackware is. It is incredible to see how much things evolved, how many apps we have out of the box, and how much stable Slackware still is. Whenever I needed something done, there was for sure a way to do it and it would STAY THAT WAY forever.
I still use only Slackware today, and it is the only Distro I would recommend to anyone. All those other distros with dependency manager and wanna-be Windows alternatives with cute dialogs and "press this button that I'll configure and lock down everything for you", they might work for an end-user that doesn't care much about Linux and that just wants an alternative to Windows. But lets be honest, they can't even get close to the "user-friendlieness" that Windows has, so they don't really fulfill they purpose. Slackware however, has the intent of being stable at the same time as it is COMPLETE and highly configurable. And it accomplishes this goal magnificently, better then any other OS.
 
Old 06-07-2011, 08:31 AM   #4
tronayne
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Distribution: Slackware 32- & 64-bit Stable
Posts: 3,075

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Rock-solid Stability, Un-fooled-around-with, Complete Out of the Box
Cons: None I Can Think of


At $47.90 (including shipping) for a two-sided DVD (64-bit version on one side, 32-bit version on the other), Slackware 13.37 is a steal. Of course either (or both) versions are available free to a good home from any number of sources; e.g., LinuxQuestion.org http://iso.linuxquestions.org/slackware/, Oregon State University Open Source Lab http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/slackware/, but I prefer to support Slackware development in what is really a small way by paying for the jewel case and its content.

Installation is a breeze -- insert the media, reboot, wait a little while for the CD-ROM/DVD to load, log in as root and you're ready to get on with it.

If it's a new machine, the first thing you would want to do is partition your disk drive (at least a root and swap partition) using cfdisk /dev/sda (for a SATA drive) or, if it's an already-in-use system, you don't need to partition anything unless you want to change it for some reason.

Next you execute setup and you're presented with a few questions to answer (assign drive partitions, automatic or manual installation [so you can pick in choose if you don't want "everything" installed]); the basics. I always do a full, automatic install -- in these days of 500 G to terabyte disk drives, there really isn't much reason to pick and choose unless you're interested in stripping things down to the bare essentials.

One common complaint about the installer is that it's not gooey; frankly, that's what I really like about it. It's text, it's simple (and thus elegant) and you don't have to wait forever for the thing to figure out what you've got in the way of hardware so you can click-'n'-drool your way through what is pretty basic stuff.

On the four machines I maintain installation takes no more than 15 minutes start-to-finish. That includes setting the root password and network configuration (typing addresses and the like). It usually takes me another 10-15 minutes to "fine-tune" the things I want a certain way -- setting up printers and plotter with HPLIP and CUPS, setting up NTPD, getting web pages and HTTPD running and the like. I also keep a few add-on packages from SlackBuilds.org http://slackbuilds.org/ and I'll install the packages from those (or, if GLIBC has changed, rebuild the packages and install them).

So, it's up, it's running, now what? How is Slackware to actually use?

Frankly, it's a dream machine -- it stays out of my way and it comes with everything already installed. Well, it doesn't come with OpenOffice.org/LibreOffice.org, but those are freely available from SlackBuilds.org and it's a quick (well, not that quick; they're roughly 18 M) download-and-install using the built-in Slackware package management tools.

Also, I've never been able to wrap my head around BASH. I've been a Korn Shell user for some decades and I'd rather fight than switch -- Korn Shell is included with Slackware, no fiddling around downloading it from somewhere or other then struggling with getting it installed and changing the default shell (I simply edit /etc/passwd -- carefully!).

I am a heavy user of a console; I've been at this on and off for... oh, dang, about 50 years (starting in 1961 with punch cards) and I'm perfectly comfortable with typing the name of a utility, some options and hitting the carriage return. A lot of folks aren't comfortable with that and prefer the "click-'n'-drool" school of computer use; I ain't one of them. I'll use a GUI-based utility if it makes life easier (K3b is one that truly makes life easier burning a CD-ROM or DVD!), but, generally, I'll type it if I can before going off and finding a different way.

Two of the best things about Slackware are:
  • It is the most un-fooled-around-with distribution there is; there is no "branding" in KDE, Firefox, Thunderbird and other utilities. What you get is what the developer(s) intended.
  • It is the most like System V. If, like me, you bounce back and forth between Slackware and, say, Solaris, well, you appreciate that. A lot.
My machine are, typically, up and running for months without a reboot.

I think that pretty much says it.
 
Old 06-07-2011, 06:08 PM   #5
jkirchner
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Distribution: Ubuntu Gnome 14.04
Posts: 629

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy to install, stable, great software selection
Cons: none I can think of


No matter how many distros I try I always end up back with Slackware; the first Linux I ever tried (Slackware 9).

I have it running on desktop and 2 laptops and it just works and works great!
 
Old 06-07-2011, 10:25 PM   #6
afreitascs
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Slackware_Cur-64_mult
Posts: 433

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: It is easy to use!
Cons: Sometimes it annoys us!


It allowed me to use Linux, especially the way he is exposed to download. I used dial-up to download ".isos",use dial-up task is arduous. But by the way that exposes your files is Slackware much easier. Now no longer use dial-up I use adsl, but I got used to Slackware.
 
Old 06-07-2011, 11:02 PM   #7
psionl0
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Distribution: slackware_64 14.0
Posts: 579

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: It is still a great Slackware system.
Cons: Don't like the 2.6.37.6 Kernel


On at least one lap top, I needed to switch to the 2.6.38.4 Kernel because the graphics was more clunky with Pat's preferred Kernel.
 
Old 06-07-2011, 11:04 PM   #8
thach.trung.ngoc
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Distribution: Slackware-Current
Posts: 46

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy to use, can do whatever you want, not afraid of breaking things
Cons: None


Slackware really suits my needs. I can install, configure and uninstall any programs without breaking others.
 
Old 06-08-2011, 12:06 AM   #9
tallship
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Distribution: Slackware - duh!
Posts: 520

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $47.00 | Rating: 10

Pros: Rock solid enterprise server.
Cons: Rock solid workstation


Running Slackware is boring - because nothing breaks.<br>
 
Old 06-08-2011, 04:01 AM   #10
business_kid
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Distribution: Slackware & Android
Posts: 6,493

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Solid Lightweight System Except for
Cons: KDE. It's nice if you can script a bit.


This is good. I was ending up in a heap with an rpm based distro every 2 years, and worked with someone who was rinning cad and pcb software for 8 years on the same box with slackware. What slackware does, it does well. ATI video works well in 13.37 - no small juggling feat that. Ditto, I am sure nvidia.

Once you are not afraid of hacking a config file, and know what you want, you can do it with slackware - painlessly. Some distros package the sun java plugin, at least one packages an alternative (blackdown?), slackware packages non iirc because anybody can and should grab one. /Etc/acpi scripts ditto - I have seen 50 scripts (.csh & .sh varieties) from some distros, of which 48 are useless. you get a defsult.sh with slackware; if you want 50 scripts, it supplies an editor, and expects you to use that. Noobs can flounder here. But that editor is called directly. I have seen /usr/bin/vim as a symlink to /etc/alternatives/vi which is a symlink to /usr/bin/vim-iMproved :-//.

I have grown to like the slackpkg. From viewing it as a disadvantage, I now see it as a painless plus. It's so easy to make your own, which makes compilations less intrusive, because you can delete exactly what you installed. I never run a make install any more.

My pet hate is KDE - that monstrous piece of bloatware that makes windows vista at it's worst look fast. I have yet to see kde on a box it didn't slow to a crawl. I think I have seen a program load in under 5 seconds in kde, but that's the exception.

VERDICT: Great if you're not a noob.
 
Old 06-08-2011, 03:04 PM   #11
number22
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 Slackware64-current multilib
Posts: 187

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $49.95 | Rating: 9

Pros: good for my needs, stable, neat and clean.
Cons:


I like slackware, using it since long long time ago, version 3.2, My server still running with 12.2, there is no need to upgrade it after doing slackpkg upgrade. slackware still support it.&lt;br&gt;13.37 is my first 64bit version on my desktop, really nice to see it running smoothly.&lt;br&gt;
 
Old 06-08-2011, 03:31 PM   #12
hyperhead
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Distribution: Slackware-current
Posts: 95

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Makes you learn
Cons: You won't find much better now!


Been through a few distros over ten years. From Mandrake to Elive to Ubuntu, but Slackware seems the cleanest, started with 13.1.

Slackware is a great tool for learning Linux. The 64 bit version of 13.37 is great for running 64bit VM's. You can have your 32bit apps running with Multilib support, so you get the best of both worlds!

You can choose to compile your own software, however Slackbuilds.org does an excellent job of providing install scripts for a wide range of packages.

No dependency support for software? Most Slackbuild scripts list the dependencies so you can install them. Create a queue in order of dependencies and you are on your way. It's not that hard!

I don't use KDE as a desktop, so couldn't comment on the quality of it with Slackware, Xfce suits me fine at the moment.

Slackware can be quite addictive, I enjoy it anyway, give it a try!
 
Old 06-08-2011, 07:04 PM   #13
Kreezii
 
Registered: May 2011
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 8

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Stable, fast, easy to maintain
Cons: You may need to compile some applications


I gave a 9 because I think never will exist a software that deserves a 10 (nothing is perfect).

What I love about this distribution is the stability, I know there are another distributions highly stable but this one, damn! I love to come at home and spend my time using the computer and not fixing it.

If you know what you are doing it's pretty easy to configure and maintain, and if you don't know you have many documentation to do the things in the right way.

The only bad thing is that you may need to compile some applications, small ones aren't a problem but big ones can be, anyway always you can find builds from another people so really it isn't a big problem either, just can be a little annoying for newcomers or people that doesn't like to compile their own software.

For me Slackware is, by far, the best Linux distribution ever!!
 
Old 06-09-2011, 01:13 AM   #14
Penthux
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 40

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: If you know Slackware you know it's THE BEST!
Cons: There are no cons with Slackware.. it's 1337!


I think my hardware had it's first orgasm the moment I logged in for the first time on Slackware 13.37!

I seriously love Slackware for it's simplicity, reliability, stability and ease of use.
 
Old 06-09-2011, 10:23 AM   #15
slack-fu
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Distribution: Slackware Linux 13.37
Posts: 71

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy to install, easy to use, easy to maintain.
Cons: I get bored because nothing need to be fixed :)


I use it as a desktop system, and It has everything i need right out of the box (except flash player), plus a zillion things I might need at some point in time. All I had to do was create a user, set up a basic firewall and tcp wrappers, install flash player and voila! Java is already there so I can access my bank right away. Python is there so I can waste some time when there's nothing on TV. I installed KDE, but I use XFCE, and KDE programs are available in the XFCE menu. The slacker life is good.
 
Old 06-12-2011, 12:04 PM   #16
H_TeXMeX_H
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: fast, stable, secure, most things work out-of-the box
Cons: can't think of any



Everything works great. It seems even faster and better than 13.1, so I like it.
 
Old 06-12-2011, 12:08 PM   #17
hitest
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,190

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros:
Cons:


Slackware is an exceptional distribution that runs very well indeed on old and modern hardware. I've used Slackware for 7 years, since version 10.0.
 
Old 06-12-2011, 01:13 PM   #18
smoooth103
 
Registered: Aug 2009
Distribution: Slackware (64 bit)
Posts: 238

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Propertually rising from the ashes of it's own self consuming flame of truth
Cons: If you haven't already been liberated from false sanity, you never will be.


You are of this faithless generation that demands proof of miracles.
 
Old 06-12-2011, 01:24 PM   #19
zasavage
 
Registered: Sep 2010
Distribution: Slackware 13.37 and Slackware 14
Posts: 193

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable , Fast , really fast , best community
Cons: Still looking foe one


In the 10 years I have used a Linux distro I have had not one gloomy day , or client server dying on me ..

I actually forget about some the servers of mine out there :)

I you spend the time to learn Slackware all the other distro's and Mac OS is a breeze

Lawrence
 
Old 06-12-2011, 03:44 PM   #20
cwizardone
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: Slackware64-current & "True Multilib." PC-BSD.
Posts: 2,238

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Secure and Rock Solid.
Cons: None come to mind


Easy to install and use. Comes with most everything a user may need.
Secure and Stable.
 
Old 07-09-2011, 11:19 AM   #21
ChocolateChicken
 
Registered: Oct 2010
Posts: 3

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Fast, Reliable, Stable
Cons: None


The default XFCE configuration is excellent. I had 13.37 x64 up and running in about 30 minutes and after stopping by slackbuilds.org I had everything I wanted in under an hour.
 
Old 07-18-2011, 09:26 PM   #22
KeithE
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Distribution: Mint, Slackware
Posts: 88

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: First 64-bit Slackware that didn't crash on my Acer Revo 3610
Cons: Wireshark and a few more XFCE apps should be part of the distro


I'd tried 13.1-64 bit and found it problematic to say the least - many crashes for no apparent reason.

After finding a few issues with Mint 10 (notably the very existence of PulseAudio! :-D ), I decided to give Slackware64 another shot (32-bit had never had problems, but it's noticeably slower on 64-bit machines). No problems installing, the nVidia driver was found (no need for Alsaconfig!), and it runs like a champ. KDE4 is still KDE4 (i.e. it's still a dog), but the KDE apps I do use work fine in XFCE.

Wireshark would be a very welcome addition, as would the XFCE system monitor.
 
Old 08-22-2011, 01:24 AM   #23
NoStressHQ
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Distribution: Slackware Leet - 32/64bit
Posts: 283

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Best philosophy, vanilla, complete, fast, stable, community
Cons: Too often underrated. ADDICTIVE.


Tons of good things to say...
Straightforward installation, fully equipped for developers, powerful, faithful to UNIX and to upstream developers (Vanilla).
LQ Slackware community is one of the best if not the best (happy and helpful people around).
Runs forever... and ever...
Good distro to learn, wonderful distro to work on...
Historically one of the first around.
A lot of tools available just on install (dev tools, admin tools, etc).
Choice of several window managers (KDE default).

slackpkg, sbopkg, src2pkg are wonderful tools for people who want to maintain an up to date system without a lot of efforts.

If I really want to find a downside: KDE Office tools are weak, and we might miss open/libre office instead, but that's easy to fix.

I've first used it in the mid-90s, add after a +10 years hiatus because of professional requirements for M$, dived into it again since 2009, with the pleasure of my teenage hacker years.

This is the ONLY distro that makes me feel happy and at home. This is the ONLY distro that gives me the thrill of using computers.

Even when I'm on M$Win to work, I got my putty/ssh/vnc on either my own server, my company server, or my local VM, just to have some fresh air... :)

Beware: once you'll try it (I mean REALLY try it), you won't be able to quit. Hypnosis, Rehab, nothing will be strong enough then...
 
Old 08-25-2011, 04:40 AM   #24
xev
 
Registered: Aug 2011
Posts: 18

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stable, fast and simple.
Cons: None


I use Slackware (Xfce) at home, Slackware (KDE) at my workplace. I'm happy with it!.. :)

Only KDE4 makes me feel a bit slow on my computer at office. But its still ROCK! :)
 
Old 09-11-2011, 01:27 AM   #25
pyrotiger
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Distribution: Slackware, LFS, Kubuntu, Mandriva, Mac OSX, Ex Windows
Posts: 13

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Ease of install. Works out of box. KISS Philosophy
Cons: NONE


It works great, had to update kernel ver to .38 from .37 to make graphics card work effectively. Will have to learn how to rely on command line. Chrome currently is buggy with this distro :(, but itll be fixed eventually.
 
Old 09-12-2011, 10:55 PM   #26
ReaperX7
 
Registered: Jul 2011
Distribution: LFS-SVN, FreeBSD 10.0
Posts: 3,382

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: If you can think of it, it's probably already a PRO to you or someone else.
Cons: There are actually CONS to Slackware? WTF? LIES I SAY!!! LIES!!! THE CON IS A LIE!!!


In all seriousness, Slackware is a great distribution of the Linux based GNU operating system. The installation is very easy and straight forward, fairly much everything runs out of the box, and it's perfect for educational usage to learning the Linux as a generalized system.

Slackware maintains itself by going only with a small variety of packages often making it appear as a "minimalist" distribution, but in reality Slackware has hundreds of thousands of packages maintained by 3rd party developers in what are dubbed, SlackBuilds.

Because Slackware relies heavily on the user and administrator to solve package dependencies, it can be intimidating at first, but this higher learning curve does allow for easier usage, a more manageable system, and it helps you the user and administrator streamline your system by cutting out waste and excess bloatware.

A wise user once said, "Teach a man Red Hat and he will learn Red Hat and all that has been derived thereof it, equally with that with Debian, SuSE, and others, but teach a man Slackware... and he shall know GNU/Linux itself."
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:27 AM   #27
brianL
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,039

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Everything
Cons: Nothing


The rating should go to 11.
 
Old 12-22-2011, 12:10 PM   #28
nutronix
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Distribution: Slackware and XUbuntu
Posts: 110

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: stable , easy to install the way you like it ,gives you choice
Cons: none really


Once i got the graphics card (nvidia 6150) working properly ,something with "nouveau" module i was in business.

I switch between kde and xfce4 and i have been a slackaholic since 8.1.
 
Old 02-19-2012, 08:18 AM   #29
liberalchrist
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Distribution: Slackware Current & FreeBSD
Posts: 122

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Reliable, Simple to Maintain, One Vision
Cons: Difficult Transition if Coming Directly from Windows


Slackware really is simplicity itself. While not designed for the absolute newbie, anyone who has been around for awhile will appreciate how Slackware works. I came back to it repeatedly before finally realizing how simple and straightforward it really was. Slackware gives you almost complete control over your environment without resorting to the somewhat over-the-top methods of Gentoo (no offense to those guys, I just don't have that kind of time).

This brings us to another point. People often consider Slackware difficult, but it was designed to allow people to "Slack". It does this by being quite leisurely in its pace. Once installed and set up, maintenance is nil. Run an update command maybe once a week with great confidence that the update won't break your system. I learned from bitter experience that other distros could not offer me that security.

It is true that the learning curve is a little steep at the beginning, but you have to learn new things with any distro. The rewards once Slackware is learned are worth many times the initial difficulties. Try it and feel the power
 
Old 02-28-2012, 05:12 AM   #30
ruario
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,866

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $32.99 | Rating: 9

Pros: Stable, predictable, simple (from an engineering standpoint), includes everything to make compiling new software easy
Cons: Steeper learning curve than many popular distros


Provides a great desktop with few/no unexpected tweaks or customisations. A great blank canvas distro for you to mould as you need or see fit. Also it is a fantastic learning experience.
 
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