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OneBase 2004 r2
Reviews Views Date of last review
2 58893 07-26-2004
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated 10.0



Description: Onebase Linux (OL) is an independent meta source/binary distribution created in July 2003. It is powerful, transparent and free. It uses its in-house versatile technology called Onebase Linux Management (OLM) for installing and managing software. Onebase Linux is targeted at a diverse community ranging from novice users to professional developers. While we only provide the basic tools, the architecture of Onebase Linux is so flexible that you can convert it into an enterprise system, workstation, game-station, server or a productivity system with just a few clicks.
Keywords: source, binary, optomised, fast, linux,


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Old 03-16-2004, 06:55 PM   #1
questionasker
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Onebase 2004-r2 | Updated through 6-10-04
Posts: 359

Rep: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: fast final product, rather simple install, good community
Cons: long install time (from source), not many packages in .olm format (yet)



I like this distro. It is a step forward for Linux. It provides a compiled-from-source base system = fast, and the option to use source or binary packages for later apps.

The Click-N-Pick feature, similar to that of Lindows(R) Click-N-Run, is nice. It makes installing apps quick, and maybe even easier than in Windows(R). A drawback is the small amount of apps available in the .olm format, but the database is ever-growing, with users submitting new ones often.

I had no trouble with OL, except in my own folly of not realising my eth0 errors (solved with help from community forums).

I would recomend this distro to almost anyone. Those "Slackers" might not like it as well, because there isnt quite the tweaking involved. The "Gentoors" may feel cheated, because the install was easier (for me, anyway), and the end result was very similar. The "Newbies" might like this distro, because of the "feel" similar to Windows(R) when KDE and Click-N-Pick is active.
Rating: 10 out of 10.
 
Old 07-26-2004, 05:07 AM   #2
Elim
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Posts: 18

Rep: Reputation: Reputation:
Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: D/L | Rating: 10

Pros: Completely customisable system, helpfull community, fast system at the end of it and simple to install
Cons: Some minor faults with some packages


This is Onebase 2004 r4

I have been in search of a linux distribution for some time now, while i have been doing this what i need from an operating system has changed. After some experience with other distrobutions like mandrake I found them too slow and bulky for what I need. I then tried numerious other 'distros' (short for distributions) everything from slackware to what i am using at the moment, Onebase.

I've been using distros of linux which are to be honest trying to be somthing they're not; Windows with their fancy guis and configureation tools, and they are just not what appeals to me. I switched to linux at the end of 2003 for a reason. Windows does not suit me its nor is it in opinion either interesting, or any kind of chalenge what so ever. I am an intermediate Linux and ive had experience with seventeen different distros on two platforms the normal pc architecture (x86) and the mac architecture (ppc). I have seen alot of very promising distros, but in my opinion none of them provide a consistantly good and fast Linux system, which can be managed.

My hardware is about average, as far today's computers go. I have three hard drives one which is my experimental hard drive which i play around with new distros on, and the other i inst for what i want to do and the other one is using Onebase. I have got a modest AMD 2400 XP which works exelently when i'm running quake 3 and ut2004 and it's mods. I have a fairly large ammount of RAM 768mb of DDR 2100 which is more than enough for what i do. The more the merrier as they say Smile . My graphics card leaves alot to be desired, as it is an entry level geforce 2 ti 64mb, before you write it off as usless think again it out performs the geforce 5200 fx and the geforce 4 mx and i got it about 2-3 years ago! My motherboard is a bit more recent though, it is an Abit Kv7 based upon the Via kt600 chipset with a nice intergrated 10/100 lan on it. My sound comes from a sound blaster pci 128.

On the Onebase website it says that they are gearing the operating system to servers and homes users, they have a wide range of tools available to manage the system all doing very usefull tasks. The most important of these tools is the olm package management system. This is a unique system of obtaining and installing software it features "inbuilt support for binary and source packages, unstable apps, concurrency support, security updates,. etc..." It can be installed with both source and binary packages or even both at the same time. Onebase is not like any other distrobution I have ever used before, the closest comparison I could make would be to slackware. Though slackware is not anywhere near as user friendly as Onebase. Onebase has clear on screen instructions throughout the inilation process and guides you through. During this review I will be covering the net installer It should be taken into consideration that the net installer is significantly different to the live CD's, hard disk instilation option and I will not be covering the LiveCD in this review. A very basic understanding of Linux and a willingness to learn about Linux is also nessisary, which of course is the most fun anyone could have with a P.C. A fast (and stable) internet connection is recommended to install Onebase using the net installer as, the vast majority of the software will be downloaded off the internet. A complete Linux virgin would not be able to install it because in order to do so, you need to know the names of key applications for example KDE. Dependancies are automatically resolved and the appropriate files are downloaded all you have to do to install a program like KDE is to type olm -s kde to install kde with source or to install with binary type olm -b kde then the rest is done for you. Doing this I was able to install a distro exactly how i wanted with exactly what I want! So if you are unsatisfied with the distrobution you are using all you have to do is download the small 108mb iso and burn it to a CDR then boot and install.

The instillation was a breeze there were only four initial commands i had to type before I could start installing the packages I wanted.
Following the on screen instructions i typed ol-connect . This launched a console based wizard, which allowed me to connect to the internet. Then i followed the next instruction which told me to type olm -s olm which updated the package management system, I had to then enter olm -s basepacks in console this installed the 'bare bones' of the operating system. The last command here was to install the kernel olm -s linux. Then it was just a process of installing I wanted, in my case all to do was type olm -b kde to install kde, oml -b samba to install samba to transfer my files from my brother's pc. Then finally olm -b mozilla. This installed all the programs nessisary to have a graphical frontend to my operating system along with the basic applications/protocalls. I then went on to install the usual programs like xmms and open office which are all at bleeding edge (very up to date) and are all available via olm.

In use Onebase is very simple the defult desktop for KDE is the normal defult desktop, but to be honest thats not important. It can all be easily customised in two minutes flat in kde control center to what suits you just like the rest of the distro. User management is easy, beacause, the Onebase team have created the ol-manage script, which allows you to add how ever many users you want and to customise them. If KDE isn't your style then you can always install Gnome, fluxbox, openbox and many more. They are available by just using the olm -b or -s then the application you want. Then to activate the window manager or desktop you can use ol-desk which allows you to select what user has what desktop on an individual basis if you desire. The Onebase have also included an amazing tool called Network OLM with it you can share an internet connection and install applications with a single command over an entire network, there are many more tools which are available but I did not get a chance to test them out. Onebase is without a doubt the most robust and feature rich operating system ive ever come accross that includes every distro i have tried so far. Get the latest version while its hot! Onebase Linux 2004-r4 has been released!

Onebase is not perfect though it only has a small development team, at the moment so there are a few minor bugs with some of the packages. Within less than 24 hours of informing them about problems with some packages they were resolved, to quote the development guidlines for the olm repository (a repository is where the applications go for people to download them) "The gallery will be regularly kept updated with latest software".

If I was to give Onebase a rating out of ten it would have to be a high 10/10. If software was art this is a masterpiece.
 




  



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