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Slackware 13.0
Reviews Views Date of last review
24 117286 07-07-2011
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $35.00 9.3



Description: After one of the most intensive periods of development in Slackware's history, the long awaited stable release of Slackware 13.0 is ready. This release brings with it many major changes since Slackware 12.2, including a completely reworked collection of X packages (a configuration file for X is no longer needed in most cases), major upgrades to the desktop environments (KDE version 4.2.4 and Xfce version 4.6.1), a new .txz package format with much better compression, and other upgrades all around -- to the development system, network services, libraries, and major applications like Firefox and Thunderbird. We think you'll agree that this version of Slackware was worth the wait. Also, this is the first release of Slackware with native support for the 64-bit x86_64 architecture! Major kudos to Eric Hameleers for all of his work, especially on the 64-bit port.
Keywords: KDE4 XFCE stable


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Old 08-31-2009, 04:40 PM   #1
gegechris99
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64bit
Posts: 728

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: stable, KDE4 runs faster than KDE3, top-notch support in the LQ forum
Cons: User must read the documentation



What's new:

Slackware 13.0 comes with two major changes: KDE4 and the new x86 64-bit official port.

Further details are available in the RELEASE_NOTES.


Some words on the installation process:

As usual, the installation/upgrade process requires some reading before starting. This is in my opinion, the single biggest obstacle facing a new Slackware user who may have come to expect to boot only the DVD/CD and to be greeted by a graphical interface that would guide him/her through the installation process.

But don't be shy, all relevant documentation is available in the root directory of the DVD or of the first installation CD, most notably:

Slackware-HOWTO

CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT

UPGRADE.TXT

By reading this information, you'll ensure a smoothless installation and you'll get the additional benefit of knowing more of what is under the hood in most other distributions.

Were you to face any particular issue (unfortunaly it can happen), you'll get quick and efficient support in the Slackware LQ forum.


Running Slackware 13.0 as my home desktop:

I've been using Slackware since version 10.2. I've been running -current (i.e the development branch) since July 2009 to get better acquainted with KDE4 prior to the release of 13.0.

Now I use Slackware 13.0 with KDE4 as my main home desktop (x86 32-bit) to perform mostly the following activities:

- Browse the internet (Firefox)
- Do some clerical work (Koffice)
- Listen to music (Amarok)
- Watch some videos (Mplayer)
- Send mails (Kmail)
- Retrieve photos from my camera (Dolphin + Gwenview)
- Manage the machine through the console (Konsole)
- Play some games (KDE Games)

The system performs as one would expect and I notice that KDE4 runs faster than KDE3.5. Also Firefox 3.5.2 starts more rapidly which is a welcome improvement from the 3.0 series.

KDE4 is known to provide less customizing features than KDE3.5 but this has no impact on me as a change of the background image and the addition of some application launchers in the panel are enough customizing for me.

So far, I have two major grievances:

- Koffice 2 looks promising but it lacks features from the 1.6 series (ex: draw charts in Kspread, arrays do not seem to work in Kword). But for simple clerical work, it's OK.

- I'm using Kmymoney2 personal finance manager in 12.2 but it's not yet ready for KDE4. It's not strictly Slackware's fault but it diminishes the interest of 13.0 for me.

So for now I also keep a version of Slackware 12.2 in another partition to which I revert to if I can not perform one activity on 13.0.

Of course, Slackware is more than just a desktop distribution but I can not comment on server-side applications because I'm not using them.


To conclude:

Slackware 13.0 is a stable and reliable version that again demonstrates the hard work and attention to detail of its founder Patrick Volkerding and the various contributors collectively known as the Slackware Team.

However, the replacement of KDE3 by KDE4 got mixed feedbacks from users. Patrick Volkerding took great pains to explain the rationale behind this switch in the RELEASE_NOTES and I follow him along that road.

Thank you Patrick for this release.
 
Old 09-02-2009, 09:57 PM   #2
brianL
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,043

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Too many to mention
Cons: None worth mentioning


It's up to the usual high standard, with the added bonus of a 64 bit version for this release. Initially I didn't like KDE4, but I've got used to it, and there are alternative DE/WMs available. So that doesn't matter. It's what lies beneath that counts.
Thoroughly recommended, as usual, to anybody - newbies or veterans, whatever.
 
Old 09-10-2009, 05:40 PM   #3
lesechang
 
Registered: Aug 2009
Posts: 41

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 7

Pros: fast and pretty
Cons: some things don't work


RAMBLING THOUGHTS

First, I have to admit I'm quite stupid in that I don't read too well and never went to linux school. I waste a lot of time messing with Linux in the dark. It is worth it to me because I really hate Micro$oft.

I had been running slackware v12.2 and should have stayed there. If it ain't broke... Still, out of suicidal curiosity, I decided to upgrade to slackware v13.0, xp86_64. I installed everything, including the international locales (extra checkmark at setup time). No problem there. The installation went well.

Next, I had to customize the system (configuration, adding software, tweaking stuff).

I couldn't install (compile) many programs due to the lack of a 32-bit library. So, I found Bob Alien's Wicky Slackware 32-bit replacement multilibrary and installed it. I think I got it right. It works because I was able to install Eterm, an old program.

Still, I kept getting locale errors -- maybe because I decided to install the international package. I might reinstall Slack64 all over again and just take the default full install if I get bold enough.

I could never get my two SLI nvidia video cards working with nvidia's proprietary drivers and in fact, I never saw the NVIDIA logo. It wouldn't load. I tried it both ways: the installpkg method, and the sh NVIDIA...sh method. Both didn't work. To make matters worse, when I hit CTRL-ALT-BKSPC to get out of kde4, I ended up with a completely black screen and no prompt! Even when I typed "shutdown -r now" blindly, I couldn't see the screen even after reboot (I heard the computer beep). Maybe I should take one of the video cards out to see if that is the problem.

Slack12.2 never game me the attitude I'm getting from Slackware 13.0, but I always expect problems when upgrading to a dot.zero version (x.0) of anything!

And what's with this "plasma" and "widget" terminology? Is this just Madison Avenue bs? Why can't I just drag and drop my icons to the bar at the bottom of the screen? How come I have to go all the way to the right of it to move icons instead of just using my middle mouse button to move it like I did in kde3? What good is that bottom bar if I can't customize it my way?

I do like having the ability to right-click the K at the bottom left and invoke the "menu editor." Very handy. I used to have a desktop icon for "Menu editor" in kde3. I use a ton of keyboard shortcuts (ctrl-alt-o for openOffice Writer, for example), and since the menu bar at the bottom won't accept my icons, only premade widgets (afaik), I really have to rely on my keyboard shortcuts to start my programs.

I also was able to have different backgrounds on each of my four desktops under kde3. How do you do that in kde4? It only lets me have one total, no matter which window I go to (afaik again). I should RTFM.

I also don't like LILO, because I am constantly messing with my hard drives and backing up clients' drives (I dual-boot M$w*ndows when I have to). I was able to install GRUB in KDE3 before and disable LILO (chmod -x /sbin/lilo). I like GRUB better because when things don't work, I can edit the bootup menu on the spot instead of having to insert boot disks or rescue cds, getting into slackware, and all this just so I can type the word "lilo" then reboot. PITA! Also, kde4 has a new file system called "ext4" and GRUB doesn't like it. There is a patch, but when I'm fighting both x86_64 AND ext4, I couldn't get it to work. I tried the slackbuild of GRUB, and nogo.

It was a relief to be able to get crossover linux 8.0 working in the slackware x86_64 version (multilib?). I use crossover for stupid games like SolitaireSuite2009 and I use M$access database for work, both of which need wine directly or crossover. At the time, OpenOffice didn't have a database and I haven't messed with OpenOffice version 3's database. I also don't know mySQL well enough to port my VBasic code over. Besides, the firm I work for is run by an old guy who is going to retire soon.

SUMMARY

I need to read the slackware x86_64 manual. In the meantime, I will wait for the next release, when the smart people hopefully will be able to get most of the bugs out of the 64-bit version. I want the next version of x86_64 slackware to INCLUDE the 32 bit libs automatically.

I am now running slackware 13.0, but the 32-bit version. Just to avoid GRUB problems, I'm back to ext3. You smart people could just patch things and compile, but I'm not there yet. Still have some problems, but at least now I can get the work out.

My suggestion is that if you have an older version of slackware that is stable and you use it for work, take your hard drive out and put it in an antistatic bag. Go buy a new hard drive (they're cheap now!) and experiment with Slackware 13.0 (either version) on that one. Install all the software you'll need and see what works. If you get your critical stuff working correctly, then transfer your old files over and you're good to go. If not, you still have an unspoiled hard drive to go back to, and you can use your new drive as a system backup. win-win.
 
Old 09-16-2009, 12:58 AM   #4
kaibs
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: slackware 14.0 32/64, ubuntu 12.04-1 server,
Posts: 5

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: it simply works
Cons: hmm


keeps on getting better, can't wait to try out the 64bit version.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 11:52 AM   #5
Linux.tar.gz
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Distribution: Slackware forever.
Posts: 2,227

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: 100% pure Linux OS. Stable. Fast. Simple. No blah blah.
Cons: Well... If i'll find one, then i'll tell ya.


Here's a way to have a PC fully powered. Even an old one. No bad surprise. No bulls**t. Good reactivity of updates. No 140 cd's set you'll never use.
I like the poor graphisms during installation because they introduce no bug.
The configuration tools (net, packages...) are quick.
On the Slackware site, you have The Book, from which you can learn Linux really fast.
The packages system is strong. No dependencies headaches.
A LOT of packages at http://slackbuilds.org/

Slack leads you from newbie to expert :
I've learned more slackin' 6 monthes than 10 years of others OS (including other Linuxes).
Well, please stop reading and just go for it.

P.S.: Big thanx to Patrick Volkerding and all other people who makes Slackware.
 
Old 10-05-2009, 04:19 AM   #6
L0N3R
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Posts: 4

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Pros: Far too many to count
Cons: Are there any?


Just keeps getting better and never disappoints
 
Old 10-19-2009, 06:35 AM   #7
xeleema
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Distribution: Slackware 13.x, rhel3/5, Solaris 8-10(sparc), HP-UX 11.x (pa-risc)
Posts: 987

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: "Keeps It Simple, Stupid", "Not Red Hat's Linux"
Cons: Not your Mother's Linux Distro, unless she's a CRAY admin.


As the saying goes;

Quote:
Get Debian and learn Debian.
Get Red Hat, and learn Red Hat.
But get Slackware, and you'll learn Linux.
If you want to skip the GUI-fications, wrapper scripts, and other things that some Linux distros implement to "make things purty", get Slackware.

It includes the documentation for most of the projects it includes, as well as many of the How-To documents from ldp.org.

The KISS principle (Keep it simple, stupid) helps troubleshooting problems for even the greenest of n00bs.
However, you have to *want* to learn, rather than clog a forum with "what does sendmail do?" type posts (/me glares at the ubuntuforums.org).

I must admit, if you want to play Corporate Linux Admin, leave the Church of the Subgenius alone and get an RHCE.

(However, if you know what you're doing, Slackware does make a great Production-quality operating system.)

Rock on, Patrick!
 
Old 10-22-2009, 06:38 AM   #8
dr_te_z
 
Registered: Mar 2006
Distribution: slackware, debian
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: feed good distro
Cons: no gnome


At the office I work on AIX machines and they expect me to work on a XP+putty PC. I decided to transform the PC to a dual-boot machine and install Slackware 13/64 bit alongside XP. I must admit that I left slackware a while ago in favour of arch & debian. But now I was confronted with an install without a live-internet connection and arch is not realLy suitable for that.
It was a slow start because my good-old GParted CD would not work on the Dell optiplex 760 :(
and I do not want to experiment too much with shrinking the NTFS XP partition. So I borrowed a SuSE 11 CD and started to install SuSE. The SuSE install left me with a usefull partitioned drive and I booted again with slackware 13 which kicked off SuSE. Just a standard install with XFCE4. Then I installed DB2-express-C (v9.7) to see how that goes (because IBM does not support this). That went allright and the connections to DB2 on the AIX is very easy now.
Slackware is very overpowered because I only use it to access the AIX-boxes, but I am happy and do not have to use XP.
My last slackware was V9 with dropline Gnome and that worked fine untill I tried to upgrade. Now with a fresh V13 and XFCE4 I am very happy again. At home I will not give up arch though.
 
Old 11-05-2009, 03:24 PM   #9
Squall90
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Distribution: Currently several distros :S
Posts: 148

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: fast, lightweight, stable, great documentation
Cons: lack of a few useful packages


Slackware is really great! Especially the documentation. But there is lack of a few packages and files, for example: The Qt packages does not contain the Qt documentation. You have to get it from another source and here you have SlackBuilds, so there is no really need of having all the packages on the Slackware CDs/DVD.
 
Old 11-08-2009, 11:12 AM   #10
Underclass Hero
 
Registered: Nov 2009
Distribution: Slackware 13.0
Posts: 3

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Highly Customizable;Old School Linux;Well-Docomented
Cons: Some applications didn't work.


I'm new to linux but I haven't had any major problems, while installing or running Slackware 13.0. One just needs to read the docs to get Slackware up and running. I'm also highly impressed with the performance.
 
Old 11-21-2009, 03:05 PM   #11
icecubeflower
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Distribution: Slackware 13.1
Posts: 304

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: still the best OS
Cons: beta KDevelop


I liked KDE 3.5 but then I got into fluxbox so the new KDE seems way too flashy to me.

My main gripe about Slack 13 is it comes with a beta version of KDevelop and it looks by the time the real KDevelop 4.0 comes out it will be incompatable with the version of KDE on Slackware 13.0. Not positive I understand this issue, I might be full of it but whatever I'm using Code::Blocks until there's a slack release with a release version of KDevelop.

And also the version of KWord that comes with Slack 13.0 can only save as ODT which makes it super annoying and useless when you have to send a resume to people you know only use Windows.

But whatever it's still the easiest OS to learn and use and hopefully I'll be giving 13.x a 10 rating. Arch comes with so little that it's annoying. All the other distros come with too much BS. Slackware is about perfect. Everyone who says the learning curve is steeper for Slackware than Ubuntu is full of it. Compling your own stuff or using pkgtool is way easier than any of the clunky package handlers that come with other distros. Nothing is more annoying than there being no package and yet being unable to simply compile something and make it work because you have to do it "the Debian way".
 
Old 11-30-2009, 07:21 PM   #12
sycamorex
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,569

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: a rock-solid and reliable product
Cons: KDE (but it's not an integral part of slackware)


It's with this release that I got rid of other distros on my computers. I used to do a lot of distro-hopping, however, since the release of Slackware 12.2 I stopped doing it. When 13 was out, I finally realised I don't need to waste my partitions on other distros when I hardly ever boot into them.
So far Slackware hasn't disappointed me.
 
Old 12-07-2009, 08:34 PM   #13
JK3mp
 
Registered: May 2009
Distribution: Slackware 13.0
Posts: 30

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Easy setup, reliable, plain awesome.
Cons: Gnome not included....


The setup was REALLY more simple than it was made out, especially if you follow the next > next default settings. I was lucky enough to be able to do so, had a few options i moved around but pretty basic setup. I did some reading before hand, but very little. My graphics card worked great... ATI Radeon 3400 series, and my Atheros wireless card worked flawlessly as well.Only downside was i prefer gnome over KDE but gave it a try, worked OK but i couldn't get use to the "setup". Installing themes MUCH easier in gnome, maybe its just me but i always have issue's in KDE. It ran smooth though, but i quickly swapped it over to use XFCE which i'd never used before and was delighted with the results. Overall very stable, would probably make more people happy if it supported gnome but with XFCE, Openbox, Awesome and so many other replacement's its a sacrifice worth making for the stability. Could even use KPPP with my Mobile Broadband card no problem. Overall very satisfied.
 
Old 12-16-2009, 10:04 PM   #14
saia
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Distribution: openSuSE
Posts: 11

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: fast, simple, more stable than other
Cons: lack of a few useful packages


There are several useful package is not included in the installer so I had to download it from the internet. This makes me uncomfortable, because my internet connection is slow to download. But I tried to complement this deficiency.

I am waiting for the next version better
 
Old 12-18-2009, 09:13 AM   #15
RLH1919
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Slackware 13 Ubuntu RHEL 5
Posts: 50

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Solid
Cons: None that I've found


It just keeps getting better.
 
Old 02-03-2010, 01:10 AM   #16
Domine
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Posts: 31

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Pros: Simple, stable and beautiful
Cons: :)



The best distro i have ever worked with. I had my first "fight"(learning) with it many years ago and i fell in love with it. Now i know how linux works. Thats all. If you wanna learn take Slackware. If you dont wanna learn better stay with Windows :) I recommend it to all my friends and people i know who want to transfer to linux.
Slackware rules!
 
Old 02-03-2010, 06:49 AM   #17
JimBrewster
 
Registered: Feb 2010
Distribution: Slackware, Salix
Posts: 237

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8

Pros: Reliable & sensible; makes you do your homework
Cons: Default install is a little bloated; makes you do your homework!


I work with a variety of older hardware, and other distros with their fancy installation gui's have a tendency to choke. Slackware has a good old reliable ncurses installation interface. If something doesn't work, the included documentation and internet resources like LQ usually offer easy fixes.

OTOH, it's not for everyone. If you're not willing to work with shell commands and text editors once in a while my advice is to spring for a Mac!
 
Old 02-28-2010, 01:28 PM   #18
wevl
 
Registered: Jun 2008
Posts: 16

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: $35.00 | Rating: 7

Pros: Standard kernel (you can patch it). I like editing configuration files rather than trying to get a broken tool to work (SuSE for example).
Cons: After all this time, I still don't like KDE 4.


I first used Slackware 3.3.0 when I downloaded and made floppy disks and read Mat Walsh's (mdw@sunsite.unc.edu) Linux Installaion HOWTO.

Some comments about the newest Slackware:

1) If you move a disk to another machine, the network won't work until you remove /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules and reboot.

I have many disks, one for each customer's project, but only a few computers. So if I decide to do some work on a given project, it is just about guaranteed that when I install the disk in the computer of choice, the network will not run on the first boot.

Same situation with my customers who may have several of my control applications in their facility. For spare parts, they have a spare disk for each application and a 1 spare computer. So any of the spare disks could end up in the spare computer and be put into service at one of the applications.

Slackware 13.0 requires someone to boot up, remove /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules and reboot before they can resume production.

2) Older KDE 3.5 (for example) labeled Konsole terminals in the order that they were opened, starting with Konsole, then Konsole 2 ....

I use a lot of Konsole terminals when developing software. I always used the first Konsole for general moving, copying files etc., Konsole was the console from which I ran my editor, Konsole I ran the non-gui controls application that I was developing, Konsole I ran the gui application that connected to the controls application, Konsole was logged in as root, Konsole was logged in on another machine on my LAN that I may be running the new software on etc...

The New Konsole terminals change their title bar depending upon the command you last ran. Fancy eye candy, maybe, but not useful to me. Arggg!

3) If you were using one type of terminal when you logged out of KDE 3.5, that is the type of terminal that started back up when you logged back in. KDE 4 always defaults to the Terminal Emulator type of terminal, even if you were using the Konsole terminals before logging out. Arggg!

4) I find that I have to use more clicks and often the scroll bar much more with KDE 4. For example, in KDE 3.5, a menu of the most used applications came up with a single click on the K-gear icon. With KDE 4, it takes a second click on the "Recently Used" icon to get to the list. Arggg! That's not progress.

I have timed the start-up and shut-down times between Slackware 12.0 KDE 3.5 and Slackware 13.0, KDE 4 on the same computer. KDE 4 takes about twice as long to start up or shut down.

5) Ever since Slackware 12.1, the emacs editor that ships with Slackware has lost a very useful tool, the ability to with a single left-click of the mouse, move a given line to the top of the screen or with a single right-click, move the line at the top of the screen to the position at which you right-clicked.

That was very very useful for example, to quickly align the start of a function at the top of the screen. If it was a function that was longer than a screen, you could easily choose the next handy position in the function to position at the top of the screen. Now you either get a whole screenfull with a click or have to use the scroll slider. Arggg!

So I choose not to install emacs when making a Slackware 13.0 disk, then install emacs from my old Slackware 12.0 disks.

On the positive side:
I still use Slackware (I am a subcriber) as my distribution of choice and recently helped get a friend who will be developing software up and running with Slackware.

I often have to write drivers for I/O cards (PCI or PC-104) and need to patch the kernel with Ingo Molnar's -rt patches to get good driver interrupt latency. Because Slackware uses so-called standard "vanilla" kernels, that works great. If I don't run XWindows, I get worse case latencies down in the 15 uSec. range. Beat that!

I love the Slackware approach of editing configuration files rather than hope that some bloated eye-candy tool works.

Wayne the obdurate
 
Old 03-12-2010, 01:58 PM   #19
mats_b_tegner
 
Registered: Nov 2009
Distribution: Slackware64
Posts: 145

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: x86_64 version, solid, few crashes
Cons:


Decided to give old Slackware another go after a very long hiatus. I like the control it gives the user when it comes to updates & patches. Had some problems with -current, but with the help of this forum, all is well now. Tested a few commercial 3D animation/rendering programs and they work great under Slackware without much hassle.
 
Old 04-12-2010, 12:59 PM   #20
ax25nut
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Distribution: Several flavors of Linux, BSD Unix, even DOS & Win-doze
Posts: 56

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Pros: straightforward, rock solid.
Cons: can be a bit stressful for newbies, lack of proper video drivers


My first and last slackware install was 3.4 from Nov '97, and although it installed ok, I had a hard time understanding everything, as I was still getting aquainted with dos! I used a 386DX-40 with a 340mb hard disk back then, and it still works, although I now have it in storage.

Currently I use an IBM ThinkCentre 2.4ghz w/160gb hard drive. I got rid of DesktopBSD 1.7 and put Slackware 12.2 on in place of it. I also got rid of one Puppy install, and created a swap partition which is now shared with Debian 5.04. My main purpose on this machine is to experiment with Slackware again and re-aquaint myself with it after over ten years absence. I would like to install it on my netbook, but I'll probably wait until someone more experienced or brave posts their experiences with one. I'm not feeling as adventurous these days, so I don't wish to take any risks with a machine I can't replace!

My biggest beef with it so far is the seeming lack of video drivers, which I believe should be included in the install. My monitor/card runs 1680x1050, and the netbook, of course, uses 1024x600. I understand I can get some nvidea or neaveau drivers for this purpose, and I may have to try that out, but I really expected better on that. It's not bad enough to prevent me from using it, though. This is a learning tool for me. I should mention at this point that I don't like the lilo install, although it used to be my favorite. I used grub under debian and edited my menu.lst file to get puppy up and running, making a nice tri-boot machine. I'll probably upgrade to one of the 13.x versions after I do some more research, but this is fine for now.
 
Old 04-26-2010, 02:01 PM   #21
ode
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 5

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: simple, robust install
Cons: not for people that don't like to read a little bit before doing things


I have tested other distros, but I prefer the simplicity of slackware. In fact, in one of my machines, it is the only one that can be installed, thanks to the simple text based interface and default text mode startup. All others I tested crashed on the install process on that compaq presario desktop.

I simply don't like KDE4 in slackware 13.0 (it also takes too much resources for what it's worth) so I switched to fluxbox and y love it!

My basic work remains done in 12.2 until I figure out some configuration issues in 13.0, but as soon as I can I will move to 13.0.

With this distro you always learn something about linux/OS every day.
 
Old 05-16-2010, 02:34 PM   #22
xasanchez
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Posts: 15

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Want to be serious with Linux? This is it.
Cons: There are, but a whole team is working with them.


Someone else already said it: Do you really want to learn Linux? This is the right distribution. I've always liked to LEARN, not just be given things. True, I need help quite often, but isn't it the way to learn? As you go on, the best award is to answer questions, not just ask them.

If you want to "de-Windows-ize", come to Slackware, and from time to time, give away a small donation. I have bought the DVD's several times, and at this moment I'm wearing my black T-shirt with the Slackware logo. I went to the hardware store this morning, and I felt just proud of it.

When I ever started to run into this marvelous world of computing, and had my first program compiled under MS-DOS by that time, I also wanted to know how that magic program could run and how it was built. Then I quickly moved on to the assembler language world. There I had a broad view of this landscape.

So Slackware takes you to Linux by a similar path. You have to work hard, right. But then you feel so comfortable when you know you have LEARNED.

"Nobody passes away wise without learning."
 
Old 02-15-2011, 10:43 AM   #23
andyt22
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: Slackware,OpenSuSE,Debian
Posts: 8

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10

Pros: Stability, reliability under heavy load, simplicity, easy to admin
Cons: None


As others have pointed out before me, Slackware is for those who want to learn Linux and understand it inside out, not just use it. Also, you gain a good knowledge of generic *n*x through Slackware which will stand you in good stead if you need to admin other Linuxes and UNIXes; learn to admin Slackware and you can admin just about anything, learn to admin, say, Ubuntu then you can admin, well, Ubuntu?

I've been using Slackware since version 0.9 in 1993 and usually buy the installation CDs/DVDs to help support the project. Although I'm a professional sysadmin and work with a lot of other Linux distros and UNIXes, Slackware is still my favourite Linux and I use it daily for servers and for desktop use (with fvwm2). And the really nice thing about it is it's the product of one guy and his team, not a huge multinational like some other distros.
 
Old 07-07-2011, 01:18 PM   #24
NaTTaN
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Distribution: Slackware 14
Posts: 28

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Would you recommend the product? yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 9

Pros: Highly stable, a lot of optional software packages
Cons: there's not unless you're a newbie


Slackware has been the distro i wanted to use since i was just a windows user, many people said it was hard to use and that everything was done manually, et cetera, et cetera..

I chose Ubuntu as the first distribution to use, used it just for some months(7 if i'm not mistaken) the i switched to Debian, and just as somebody told it got corrupted and the system got broken so i just could use for less tahn a year then i switched to Windows again, but than i felt i was just going around in an infinit loop(format-install-gets infected-format-install-gets infected-format) so i switched to Salckware at first, i must admit i had some problems but it was my fault cause i didn't know how to format a partition because Ubuntu and Debian do that automaticly, and finally i could do it, i installed it and everything was just fine.

the only bad thing i can mention is that some drivers are missing, but this is normal in the GNU/Linux world soooo i don't even know if it worth mentioning...
 




  



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