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Old 12-06-2012, 05:40 AM   #1
herakles_14
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the right way for tar.bz2


1710.1
Hi;

I am set to install the beta versions for firefox-18.0b1.tar.bz2 an thunderbird-18.0b1.tar.bz2.


I am not positive if I have the right command, I checked an old Ubuntu manual (9.04) this is what they have for extracting files from a tar archive?


tar -xjf thunderbird-18.0b1.tar.bz2 and the same for Firefox being; tar -xjf firefox-18.0b1.tar.bz2

the command was actually tar -xjf (nameofthing).tar.bz2

My question is two fold first off do the two commands look right an secondly would I need to put sudo before so it would read: sudo tar -xjf thunderbird-18.0b1.tar.bz2 and the same for Firefox?

One last query should I place a dot (.) in front of the first tar so it would be 'sudo .tar -xjf thunderbird-18.0b1.tar.bz2'? Or leave it as is 'tar -xjf firefox-18.0b1.tar.bz2' The same for Thunderbird?

TIA

herakles_14

Last edited by herakles_14; 12-06-2012 at 05:42 AM. Reason: added info
 
Old 12-06-2012, 05:49 AM   #2
snowpine
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Don't improvise and start adding . or sudo to terminal commands! In Linux you must use exact commands, you can't just improvise "I wonder what would happen if..." (good way to break your system) Also I don't recommend to use tutorials for outdated releases; always check the latest reliable documentation from help.ubuntu.com (or simply 'man tar')

However the easiest way for you to extract these "tarball" archives is to just right-click on them, chose Extract.


Anyway the easiest way to get the latest beta Firefox and Thunderbird is to add the Mozilla Beta Channel PPA to your software sources:

https://launchpad.net/~mozillateam/+...e/firefox-next

Then these packages will be tracked through your package manager, it is really the best way (in my opinion).

Of course you will be using beta software instead of the stable, tested & trusted Firefox/Thunderbird provided by Ubuntu, so I am assuming you have the technical skills to troubleshoot when something goes wrong?

Last edited by snowpine; 12-06-2012 at 02:09 PM.
 
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:07 PM   #3
John VV
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Unless you have been manually installing programs by hand for years
It is BEST to use your package manager IF and when possible

but
Firefox is one of the ODD CASES
it is a binary tar
an NOT source code


just unzip it

but there are a lot of things you will have to manually do to really get it to work

so , use your package manager when possible .
 
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:32 AM   #4
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herakles_14 View Post
I am set to install the beta versions for firefox-18.0b1.tar.bz2 an thunderbird-18.0b1.tar.bz2. ...
For firefox, you can just untar it and run it from your home directory. There is no need to install it. Just download it to your home direcrory, then untar it:
Code:
tar -xvjf firefox-xxx.tar.bz2
where xxx is the version that you download. Then cd into the newly created firefox directory.
Code:
cd firefox
Then make a directory for your plugins to link to:
Code:
mkdir plugins
Then cd to the newly created plugins directory and link your current firefox plugins to the the new firefox in your home directory:
Code:
cd plugins
ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/* .
Note the period at the end of that command. Replace the lib directory with lib64 if you are running 64 bit Ubuntu. (Note that you must also be sure to download the 64 bit build of firefox 18 beta if you are running 64 bit Ubuntu). Then cd back up to the firefox directory:
Code:
cd ..
Then run the new firefox with:
Code:
./firefox &
The & at the end of that command will free up your terminal to be used for other stuff.
I have done this many times on both Ubuntu and Slackware and it works fine. There is no need for sudo or root commands or messing with PPAs.
The firefox you have installed from the Ubuntu repos will not be altered by running the firefox beta like this.

Last edited by tommcd; 12-07-2012 at 02:39 AM.
 
Old 12-07-2012, 06:43 AM   #5
TobiSGD
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The Firefox betas are there for volunteers to help ruling out the bugs. If you have to ask these basic questions running the unstable betas may not be the right thing to do.
 
Old 12-07-2012, 01:10 PM   #6
widget
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The Firefox betas are there for volunteers to help ruling out the bugs. If you have to ask these basic questions running the unstable betas may not be the right thing to do.
While what you say is true and I generally agree with it, it is kind of hard to be prepared to run testing versions of software the first time you do it.

If you want to run testing versions sometime along you have to just jump in.

Of coarse learning to read man pages would be a good idea.
 
Old 12-07-2012, 01:44 PM   #7
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by widget View Post
While what you say is true and I generally agree with it, it is kind of hard to be prepared to run testing versions of software the first time you do it.

If you want to run testing versions sometime along you have to just jump in.
You should have the basic knowledge first. If you encounter a bug that you can't fix or at least give a proper bug-report because you lack the knowledge this is neither helpful for the developer nor a good experience for the user.
This may be different if you simply want to run the latest of the latest and pay the price of bugs for it.
 
Old 12-07-2012, 09:21 PM   #8
John VV
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If one IS going to use a BETA testing version then one SHOULD have some basic knowlage of being able to solve problems AND write a "bug report"

that said
one DOSE have to start some time and ff 18 is as good a spot as Mozilla 0.8

so
if you ARE intent on using a TESTING ONLY
version of firefox .

Then you also might want to install the CURRENT BETA
18 beta3 ( there is a VERY VERY VERY big difference from b3 and b1 )
https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla....leases/18.0b3/
the 64 bit B3 BETA TESTING -- US of A english version
https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla....-x86_64/en-US/
or install the nightly build

-- WARNING ---

the nightly build is VERY UNSTABLE !!!

https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla....refox/nightly/

But also plese READ
https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/...eveloper_Guide
http://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/mozilla-news
and anything else you can find on FF and seamonky

Last edited by John VV; 12-07-2012 at 10:59 PM.
 
Old 12-09-2012, 01:32 AM   #9
widget
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
You should have the basic knowledge first. If you encounter a bug that you can't fix or at least give a proper bug-report because you lack the knowledge this is neither helpful for the developer nor a good experience for the user.
This may be different if you simply want to run the latest of the latest and pay the price of bugs for it.
Yup. I still agree with you.

A guy still has to start somewhere. Could be he started too soon. This may give him a pause for thought.

Or it may give him a chance to do some real fast studying.
 
Old 12-10-2012, 03:44 AM   #10
herakles_14
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First off I wish to thank; snowpine, John VV, tommcd, TobiSGD an widget for taking the time to help me with my dilemma about the beta version(s) of Firefox and Thunderbird.You all brought out some good points an I need to be a little more prepared before I download an install any Beta versions. I am going to copy the command sequence given by tommcd as a guide for the next time I consider installing a Beta version. I have not given up the idea of installing a beta version just for the nonce I believe I need a bit more knowledge of what may or may not go KABOOM!!!
Again thanks for all you help.
 
Old 12-10-2012, 04:48 PM   #11
widget
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One thing I keep suggesting and will again here is to make yourself another install. A small "throw away" install of 6 to 10 gigs that you just use for experimentation and learning.

If you blow it, so what? Reinstall.

Use it for anything you are not sure of. This protects your "real" install while letting you try things from a real install working on your real hardware as opposed to a VB or VM install.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 02:43 AM   #12
herakles_14
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widget, your advice on making a small 'throw away' install is a good one. My problem an perhaps it is one you can help me with is how do I create this 'Install'? What do I need? You say it should be six to 8 gigs, would it be on a ... blast I know what I want to say but can't think of the word. It's the small thing you can plug into a USB port. Something along that, am I getting close or am I way of course??

If I blow it, reinstall? Are you talking about whatever I was trying to install in the first place and was with this 6 to 8 gig doohickey? If I can figure it out, with your help, maybe I could try more things that right now I am hesitant to try?

herakles_14
 
Old 12-11-2012, 07:09 AM   #13
TobiSGD
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Running an OS for testing from an USB storage device is a smart idea, it makes the re-install procedure after failure even easier.
Just use the installer for your favorite distro to install it on the USB device. Keep in mind that you should install the bootloader for that distribution on the USB device, not on the internal disk.
If you now want to start the testing system just choose the USB device in the BIOS' boot menu. this way both installs will be totally independent.
Even better, you can use dd to just make an image of the whole device that you simply write back in case you bork the testing system.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 02:54 PM   #14
widget
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herakles_14 View Post
widget, your advice on making a small 'throw away' install is a good one. My problem an perhaps it is one you can help me with is how do I create this 'Install'? What do I need? You say it should be six to 8 gigs, would it be on a ... blast I know what I want to say but can't think of the word. It's the small thing you can plug into a USB port. Something along that, am I getting close or am I way of course??

If I blow it, reinstall? Are you talking about whatever I was trying to install in the first place and was with this 6 to 8 gig doohickey? If I can figure it out, with your help, maybe I could try more things that right now I am hesitant to try?

herakles_14
TobiSDG seems to have covered it quite well.

You could, of coarse do it on your main drive but usb device makes it much safer.

I have a dual HDD external enclosure that I use as a test bed. A little large for what you need to do but if you get into testing dev cycle OS's something you might want to keep in mind. When using it I disable my internal drives for that much more peace of mind.

You should get some advice on which usb sticks work best for installs. I have a usb stick but and it will load an installed OS but is very slow. Got it as it was cheap and I never had one before. I know there are sticks that work a lot better but don't know which ones.

Starting to think I may be too much of a geezer to use a usb stick. Just use it for portable files now but have an awful time trying to not loose the little bugger.
 
  


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