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Old 04-15-2005, 07:03 PM   #1
jagibbs
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Registered: Nov 2004
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Distribution: Debian Sarge / Mandrake 10.1 / Ubuntu 5.04 / Vector Linux 5.8
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automatic login as root


Is there anyway to work around not being able to automatically log in as root? For me, being root all the time is most practical, but having to manually log in becomes a hassle. I'm sure there's a way, but as I'm still learning, haven't figured it out yet.

EDIT: and I'm using gnome

Last edited by jagibbs; 04-15-2005 at 07:07 PM.
 
Old 04-15-2005, 07:05 PM   #2
mcd
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it's a bad idea. you really don't want to run as root all the time. the "su" command can let you temporarily assume superuser powers when you need to.
 
Old 04-15-2005, 07:10 PM   #3
jagibbs
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exactly why is it a bad idea? how is it different than being Administrator in Windows? I guess there are other ways around it, but I never want to have to type my root password or "sudo su" once I'm in. It's just really annoying all the time...or even some of the time. Maybe I can change permissions on all the administrative functions once I'm in so it doesn't ask for root privledges? I'll have to narrow down exactly what functions I use often that requires root privledges. Even using Synaptic you need root priv.

Is it a bad idea because I might mess something up while root, or because security is compromised with respect to outside attackers?

Last edited by jagibbs; 04-15-2005 at 07:47 PM.
 
Old 04-15-2005, 07:55 PM   #4
mcd
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Quote:
Is it a bad idea because I might mess something up while root, or because security is compromised with respect to outside attackers?
both.

Quote:
how is it different than being Administrator in Windows?
it's not different, which is why there are so many compromised bots out there, lol. and i seem to remember something about microsoft changing that default setting in the future.

anyway, there aren't that many things that require you to be root. for me it's not a big deal, but aterm is also the only app that starts automatically when i startx. i understand that for other people it's more of an inconvenience. i suggest looking into groups. you can create groups with permission to do the various things you want to do, and add your user to those groups.
 
Old 04-15-2005, 08:00 PM   #5
xanthar
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Being root is much different to being Administrator in Windows. As root, in linux, you CAN format your hard-drive, delete stuff like the init scripts, the window manager etc, requireing days of frustration and LOTS of coffee.... It's VERY dangerous to be root on a regular basis! In Windows, most programs won't work, or work crippled if you're NOT admin. An admin in win cannot do extensive system damage. In Linux, this is the opposite, as some programs will refuse to start if you're root (consider xQln - a math function drawer). A normal user in linux is able to install programs (not system-wide, but for himself), can run ALL programs, can change his own settings, can compile programs etc, can start/stop daemons (system services that is).. Plus, while in user mode, access to your kernel is restricted. In super user mode, it is not. Root is for system maintanence (janitorial) tasks ONLY and configuration such as network config and the such! I generally use it twice a day tops, for a few minutes. As standard user you have all FULL access to the system (more or less standard user in ubuntu is the equivalent of Admin in windows while an especially crippled user, given access to almost no groups in ubuntu is equivalent to user in windowz).
Synaptic DOES NOT INSTALL WITH YOU AS ROOT! It installs on a user account with you having root priviledge. It asks for YOUR password, not root's (as does, let's say Mandrake's package manager), so you being true root won't help.
Ubuntu doesn't employ standard root procedures, as it doesn't have a root account enabled. You'll need to create it. In order to create it (it's useful, as you can use su, a simpler command than sudo) type this at the console

Code:
$sudo passwd root
Then, you will be asked to provide root's password. DO NOT LOG ON AS ROOT. Use SU! And if you are using Apache, you should give yourself rights to the folder rather than using root!
 
Old 04-15-2005, 08:15 PM   #6
jagibbs
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ok, thanks for the tips. I'll look into things further. I'm planning on a complete system rebuild and reinstall in about a week and may change back to a setup with a regular user login then.

Last edited by jagibbs; 04-15-2005 at 08:16 PM.
 
  


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