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Old 02-16-2006, 07:41 PM   #1
Cb6000
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Browsing Windows Partitions on OpenSuSE 10.0


Hello. I noticed that after installing OpenSuSE (unlike Mandriva), Samba (I think that's what the name of the program is) isn't automatically set up to where you can view Windows partitions.. Can someone show me (or provide a link) how to manually configure Linux to be able to view Windows partitions? I would definitely appreciate it.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 07:46 PM   #2
flebber
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Easiest way I found was to access my windows partitions was to use Konqueror.

Go to storage Media locate hda1 or whatever your windows partiton is and proceed from there. the bonus is with konqueror is that you can save the places in windows you want to use with Bookmarks so you need not search again.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 07:55 PM   #3
Cb6000
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Thumbs down

I appreciate it, however, it only displays the Linux partitions -- no Windows partitions at all.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 08:22 PM   #4
nomb
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when u go through the computer icon on your desktop it would be computer-filesystem-windows-C... D... how ever many drives windows usually has. Also, if you still don't see it, what version of windows are u using and also what filesystem are you using? NTFS?
 
Old 02-16-2006, 08:45 PM   #5
Cb6000
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Windows XP Home, and using NTFS.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 09:42 PM   #6
nomb
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when u use the linux partitioner, do u see your windows partitions? also when u installed suse when it did your partition setup did u see it make the new ones and then switch the mount point of the xp partition over to hda2 or w/e it does
 
Old 02-16-2006, 10:01 PM   #7
victorh
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If you want to access your Windows partitions on Linux, you have to mount them in some directory of your file system. Adittionally you can make this partitions to mount at boot or manually. The first info you need to know is the partition of your hard disk recognized by the Linux kernel, type the following commands in a console:

su (to become ROOT)
Password: (type your root password)
fdisk -l (this will print in the console the partitions in your hard disk)

with this info we can give you more ideas.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 10:21 PM   #8
Cb6000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nomb
when u use the linux partitioner, do u see your windows partitions? also when u installed suse when it did your partition setup did u see it make the new ones and then switch the mount point of the xp partition over to hda2 or w/e it does
I certainly do.

hda1 is my first NTFS partition, and hdb1 is the second NTFS. hda2 is the extended, hda5 is the /, hda6 is the swap, and hda7 is /boot.

I hope this information helps.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 10:52 PM   #9
Cb6000
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Disk /dev/hda: 60.0 GB, 60022480896 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7297 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 6374 51199123+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/hda2 6375 7297 7413997+ 5 Extended
/dev/hda5 6375 6801 3429846 83 Linux
/dev/hda6 6802 6871 562243+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/hda7 6872 7297 3421813+ 83 Linux

Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hdb1 1 9729 78148161 7 HPFS/NTFS
 
Old 02-16-2006, 11:11 PM   #10
crazibri
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If you click on "MY Computer" it should take you to a Konqueror window with the path "media:/" This should list all your mounted partitions.

If you go to your Konsole, just type "mount" and it will list all mounted partitions and what folder they're mounted to.

When you install Suse, it ususally sets your mount paths automatically. Usually they're listed as /windows/C and /windows/D and more if you have more windows partitions (NTFS, Fat32, etc).

Media:/ is just a nice little GUI feature that lists your mounted partitions. Its just like man:/ is the same as using the man pages. Example man:/mount in Konqueror will show you the manual for the mount command.

Let me know if you need further clarification.
Thanks
 
Old 02-17-2006, 12:19 AM   #11
victorh
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Hi Cb6000, one thing that you'll notice while learning and using Linux is that you always have many options to perform a task, this is the case when handling mounting partitions, so let's see what they are:

First, in your case you have the following partitions in your PC:

/dev/hda1 NTFS
/dev/hda5 Ext3 Linux
/dev/hda6 Swap
/dev/hda7 Ext3 Linux
/dev/hdb1 NTFS

The setup and configuration of your partitions resides in the file /etc/fstab, to see the contents of this file type:

cat /etc/fstab

in this file you'll see not only one line for each of these partitions but also for other devices that you can mount in your filesystem (CD, DVD, floppy, etc). In the second column of this file you'll see the Mount Point of each partition, this is, the directory where you will find all the files of that partition. The third column sets the type of filesystem and the fourth the options that define how the filesystem is mounted, e.g. you can define which users have access to that filesystem and also which of these partitions will be mounted at boot, you have many other options (try man mount to read more about these options).

As crazibri mentioned SuSE set these mount points automatically while installing and therefore create a directory for each mount point. normally you can work with these mount points BUT you can always change the mount point to other directory that you want, also you can change the options that you may think necessary.

Finally, when you want to mount some partition manually use the command mount (you must be root to do this), for example:

mount /dev/hda1 /the/directory/set/in/etc/fstab

you'll have access to these files, depending on the options set in /etc/fstab you can have read/write permissions on these files. In general, you can only read NTFS filesystems, but there are some alternatives to let you have read/write permissions on a NTFS filesystem.

SuSE also has some Graphic frontends to let you see your partitions:
K Menu -> System -> Monitor -> KInfoCenter -> Partitions
MY Computer -> media:/
** Note that these applications are only reading the setup written in the file /etc/fstab, and when using Konqueror to browse media:/ you can use the right bottom of your mouse and select Mount to mount that partition.

You can also use YaST -> System -> Partitioner
** Note if you use YaST you can create and even erase some partitions, thus overwriting the file /etc/fstab and in some cases losing the information in these partitions. So be careful! and don't use this option unless you know what you are doing.
 
  


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