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-   -   Slackware 11 and the use of an odd kernel (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-installation-40/slackware-11-and-the-use-of-an-odd-kernel-541589/)

ve1drg 03-29-2007 06:48 AM

Slackware 11 and the use of an odd kernel
 
I am having hugh problems installing Slackware 11 on a new machine which has sata II drives.
I can't hit the enter key where it gives you the choice to use other kernels. I have to use test26.i and that one will install slackware and it is the only one that allows me to use fdisk and to get on with the installation process.

Now my question/concerns:

Once Slackware is installed - I see that it is using kernel 2.6.18.
But the modules that are installed at 2.4.33.3.

Result - I can't run anything since I have no modules.

Next: I went into /usr/src directory and I only see a kernel installation of 2.4.33.3. There is nothing there that concerns 2.6.18. I even did a search (find / -name *2.6*) and I found nothing
about the 2.6 kernel.

What has happened here? How do I get the modules installed? Will Slackware 11 not do that for me when I select test26 or hugh26 kernels? There are valid choices. So where are the modules??

fUuGeL 03-29-2007 07:13 AM

Hi! You must install kernel modules and source from the Extra directory on your install DVD or install disk nr 2

ve1drg 03-29-2007 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fUuGeL
Hi! You must install kernel modules and source from the Extra directory on your install DVD or install disk nr 2

Alright.. I didn't know that. What a life???

ve1drg 03-29-2007 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ve1drg
Alright.. I didn't know that. What a life???



I was just thinking..... when you install slackware in the normal fashion, you never have to also go to the 'extra' disk/directory to separately install the modules. Whey in the world do you have to do that when you select a different kernel than the default one - at the start of the installation process?

I know that when I go and get a new kernel and install it in Slackware or any other distribution, the installation process automatically creates the necessary modules. But it appears that with Slackware - if you choose other than the default installation kernel that you are going to have to go and find the modules after you finished installing slackware. In other words, after you are all finished putting on slackware you than have to go and look for the related/necessary moduules?????

That does not sound right to me!!!

bioe007 03-29-2007 11:33 AM

Quote:

That does not sound right to me!!!
since when has slackware been a 'do it for you' distro?

my suggestion would be to make your first priority after reinstall to compile your own kernel. that way any auto-configuring scripts or sw you may use will have the best chance to setup - and your box will be its most efficient.

Pat V. doesn't know what hardware you have, or if you'll ever want the optional kernels - past installation anyway.

after install for me the next step is cp /usb/linux-2.6* then make oldconfig, make bzImage etc...

I always install with huge26.s but never copy any modules.

Alien Bob 03-29-2007 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ve1drg
I was just thinking..... when you install slackware in the normal fashion, you never have to also go to the 'extra' disk/directory to separately install the modules. Whey in the world do you have to do that when you select a different kernel than the default one - at the start of the installation process?

I know that when I go and get a new kernel and install it in Slackware or any other distribution, the installation process automatically creates the necessary modules. But it appears that with Slackware - if you choose other than the default installation kernel that you are going to have to go and find the modules after you finished installing slackware. In other words, after you are all finished putting on slackware you than have to go and look for the related/necessary moduules?????

That does not sound right to me!!!

There is no more to it than reading what is actually on your screen when you boot the install CD... the opening screen tells you to press F2 and F3 for more information.
In the F3 screen (listing the choice of boot kernels) you will notice these two lines:

Code:

    huge26.s    -      A loaded 2.6 kernel (requires modules from /extra)
    test26.s    -      A loaded 2.6 kernel (needs modules from /testing)

You don't have to boot the CD in order to read that screen - look at http://slackware.osuosl.org/slackwar...solinux/f3.txt

You should also read the RELEASE_NOTES for Slackware 11.0 (yeah I hear you thinking 'who reads those' well too bad if you don't). That file states (right behind the reasons for adding 2.6 kernels as a convenience in the installer):
Code:

Also, the kernel module packages for 2.6.x are not part of the
standard installation, so if you install using huge26.s or test26.s
kernel you'll have to install the corresponding kernel-modules package
when you're done.  They can be found under /extra/linux-2.6.17.13/ (or
ISO number two under /extra/linux-2.6.17.13), or
/testing/packages/linux-2.6.18/ (or ISO number four under
/testing-2.6.18/packages/linux-2.6.18)

Eric

onebuck 03-30-2007 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ve1drg
I was just thinking..... when you install slackware in the normal fashion, you never have to also go to the 'extra' disk/directory to separately install the modules. Whey in the world do you have to do that when you select a different kernel than the default one - at the start of the installation process?

I know that when I go and get a new kernel and install it in Slackware or any other distribution, the installation process automatically creates the necessary modules. But it appears that with Slackware - if you choose other than the default installation kernel that you are going to have to go and find the modules after you finished installing slackware. In other words, after you are all finished putting on slackware you than have to go and look for the related/necessary moduules?????

That does not sound right to me!!!

Hi,

Read the Slackware 11 RELEASE_NOTE.

edit: Sorry Eric, I was reading the post that I replied too without reading the thread.


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