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-   -   Help needed to add slackware to a dual boot laptop (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-installation-40/help-needed-to-add-slackware-to-a-dual-boot-laptop-4175458498/)

puru 04-17-2013 12:07 PM

Help needed to add slackware to a dual boot laptop
 
Hi all

I'm new to this forum but i'm using linux (ubuntu) for a year now. My Dell N5050 laptop is currently a dual-boot with win 7 and ubuntu 12.4. I want to migrate to slackware (initially i could not make mind to install slackware for the dual boot.) I want to retain ubuntu a while before completely switching to slackware. I want to use 50GB of current linux space for the slackware. Only thing I want is not to mess with my current two OSes and a miscellaneous data partition in the process.

1. I plan to reduce the linux partition and use the available space for slackware. Do I need to divide the available space into three partitions for /, /home, and /usr?
2. I have not installed slackware before although i have installed ubuntu and vector linux using ISO. Is any special care to be taken while installing slackware? What should I do while installing slackware so that my current bootloader (GRUB) will be retained and would identify slackware on its own?
3. Can I switch DEs in slackware, as I do on ubuntu (occasionally using xfce)?
4. When I tried vector linux on a live usb, I was unable to get internet working because I dont know how to configure it (I'm using tata photon) on WICD. Can I install the same network manager I use on ubuntu (it is GNOME network manager, I think) on slackware?
5. As I'm installing slackware as a noob, what type of install should it be(full or newbie)? Is the difference in installs or the process of installation?

Thanks in anticipation for help you would surely provide.:)

apink 04-17-2013 02:14 PM

Quote:

1. I plan to reduce the linux partition and use the available space for slackware. Do I need to divide the available space into three partitions for /, /home, and /usr?
2. I have not installed slackware before although i have installed ubuntu and vector linux using ISO. Is any special care to be taken while installing slackware? What should I do while installing slackware so that my current bootloader (GRUB) will be retained and would identify slackware on its own?
3. Can I switch DEs in slackware, as I do on ubuntu (occasionally using xfce)?
4. When I tried vector linux on a live usb, I was unable to get internet working because I dont know how to configure it (I'm using tata photon) on WICD. Can I install the same network manager I use on ubuntu (it is GNOME network manager, I think) on slackware?
5. As I'm installing slackware as a noob, what type of install should it be(full or newbie)? Is the difference in installs or the process of installation?

FWIW. I'm not an expert, just a user.
1. Your partitions are really up to you. If you just want to experiment with slackware to see how you like it you could just put /, /home and /usr in the same partition, with the idea that if you will change things later when you know whether or not you like slackware. If you are thinking that this will be a permanent migration to slackware (or even a permanent migration away from ubuntu) you may wish to have at least /home on a separate partition so that you don't have to remake it all of the time. I currently have two different GNU/linux systems both using the same /home partition, so that my files are always there no matter which linux system I am using.
2. While I have not installed slackware on a desktop or laptop (I am using it on my pandora, but the installation was a little different), I have installed many a linux on my computers. There has always been a step in the installation process where you are asked if you want to wipe the boot loader clean and install a new one. I have always agreed to the new boot loader and then it identifies all of the systems on my computer. You may not wish to take this chance. In this case you can say no when prompted. GRUB has ways to re-examine your setup and identify new OS's. (I forget the specific command. Duckduckgo is your friend.)
3. Yes. LInux is nice in this way.
4. I don't konw. Usually when the internet hasn't worked for me with a new OS it is because the drivers for my ethernet/wifi are not included in the os.
5. Again. I don't konw, but you will probably be just fine either way. If you are nervous, try the newbie install. If you find that you need a more powerful setup you can reinstall with full. No harm in trying something new.

puru 04-20-2013 02:02 AM

Thanks again for the help.

Did a full install of slackware yesterday. Skipped LILO and added menuentry to existing GRUB. Everything seems to be working fine as of now including both DEs and internet. In the process added the windows partition to slackware to access successfully.

If one has elementary knowledge of linux and is patient enough to read the on-screen instruction, slackware install is easy enough for a newbie also. But as said at in the installation guide, extra-keystrokes are not forgiven (so be patient, don't panic if screen seems to be stalled) and remember that there is *no back button*.


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