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Old 06-22-2005, 02:14 PM   #1
JustinCoyan
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Error when loading Patrick's config file...


Following these steps...

Code:
You may now start configuring from scratch, however as I already explained I believe that it is better to load Patrick's configuration file and build on it. In the configuration window, choose the option 'Load an alternate file', an type /usr/src/config-2.6.10 in the box, then click 'ok'. You have now loaded a proper startup configuration file.
I try loading the config file and I receive the following error, then it stops.

Code:
'  invalid for LOG_BUF_SHIFTsymbol value '14
make[1]: *** [menuconfig] Error 1
make: *** [menuconfig] Error 2
I recall following these steps before and it worked just fine. Anyone have a clue what I'm doing wrong?

Last edited by JustinCoyan; 06-22-2005 at 02:20 PM.
 
Old 07-05-2005, 12:41 AM   #2
Bruce Hill
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I don't know where you got those instructions, but I would throw them away quickly.

What are you trying to do?
Upgrade your kernel?
Which kernel are you running now? (uname -r)
Do you have the kernel sources for the new kernel?
Where did you unpack them?
Which guide are you following to install your kernel?
Do you know your hardware intimately?

If you want to use Pat's kernel config as a starting point, you're wasting your time compiling
with it. Just install his kernel and be done with it. If you use the 2.6.10 kernel, even just the
config file, you should read his README.initrd file that comes with it, or the kernel probably
won't reboot when you're finished.

It's a whole lot easier to just learn how to compile a kernel with a good guide and do it
yourself. If you save your old kernel, you can boot back into it until you get a new good
kernel.

There is a README file that comes with the kernel sources written by Linus Torvalds. He is
probably The Expert (TM) on the Linux kernel, so you should read that. And here is a good
guide written by Jesper Juhl which will work just fine. I would recommend that you do not
make the System.map symlink he suggests at the bottom of that guide, but everything
else is fine.
 
Old 07-05-2005, 01:10 AM   #3
Bruce Hill
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additional remarks....

If you got that information from this guide > http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/answers/408 then I see why you're having problems. That guide has several errors. I would not use it...
 
Old 07-07-2005, 04:28 PM   #4
uselpa
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chinaman
If you want to use Pat's kernel config as a starting point, you're wasting your time compiling
with it. Just install his kernel and be done with it.
When I compiled a kernel 2.6.11.12, I also built on Pat's config file for 2.6.10, and it worked perfectly. As long as you use an existing kernel config file from the same series (i.e. 2.6, don't mix 2.4 and 2.6) and from a lesser version (2.6.10 < 2.6.11.12), I can't see why that wouldn't work.
 
Old 07-07-2005, 07:53 PM   #5
Bruce Hill
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Quote:
Originally posted by uselpa
When I compiled a kernel 2.6.11.12, I also built on Pat's config file for 2.6.10, and it worked perfectly. As long as you use an existing kernel config file from the same series (i.e. 2.6, don't mix 2.4 and 2.6) and from a lesser version (2.6.10 < 2.6.11.12), I can't see why that wouldn't work.
Then I'll explain to you why it might not work.

Pat's config file for 2.6.10 has support for ext2 built in, but all others as modules. Who is running a non-journalized filesystem on a Slackware-10.1 box these days? Especially on the / partition. That's just not a good choice.

Most people choose ext3 or reiserfs, especially since ReiserFS is the default when you install Slackware. (Patrick himself even uses reiserfs for his / filesystem.) So if this guy (or anyone else) doesn't know enough to compile his own kernel, he's more than likely not going to know to look through those file systems and change (at least) his / partition's file system from a module to built in, nor to read and learn how to make an initrd. And if he doesn't, and there's no reason to say that he will, and he doesn't make and install an initrd.img, the kernel isn't going to boot unless he has ext2 as his / filesystem. (At least the .config generated by the sources from Kernel.org has reiserfs bulit in.) You can browse LQ and see how many kernel panic threads were created as the result of not having support for the / filesystem built into the kernel.

Another reason not to use that config of Pat's is that it is loaded with modules for hardware that your box doesn't have. If you don't know your own hardware enough to compile your own kernel, starting with that config isn't going to help you learn anymore than starting with a pristine set of sources from Kernel.org. You still have to make the choice on everything, which means you need to read the help on it all. So if you're going to use Pat's module laden kernel config, you might as well just install his packages for it, including making the initrd.img according to his instructions.

Just my opinion, feel free to disagree. And that guide he used has some incorrect instructions. There are many better ones on the internet ... the one I recommended earlier is for someone who understands how to build and configure a kernel, but is new to the proper way to compile and install a 2.6 kernel. Kwan Lowe has a very good Kernel Rebuild Guide that I usually recommend to newbies. I haven't seen a better one yet.
 
Old 07-08-2005, 01:35 AM   #6
uselpa
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I see your point, but I still disagree.

I believe it's a good starting point to use Pat's config file because it fits well into Slackware. Of course you'll have to do some research, like using the rc.modules-2.6.10 he provides and reading the README about initrd. Or build reiserfs and mouse support directly into the kernel. It'll still be "module laden" as you put it, but not more so that Pat's kernel, and it will work. And it's obviously a better choice than starting with an non-existent .config file, _especially_ for a newbie.

Furthermore, when Slackware will provide the next 2.6 kernel it is likely to be based on Pat's previous config files for 2.6, making the transition easy.

This way, you get a quick start at compiling kernels and you can improve your configuration from there if you want to. I think this approach is more newbie-friendly that to say "don't do it unless you _exactly_ know what you are doing and you are able to do it perfectly".
 
Old 07-08-2005, 01:39 AM   #7
Bruce Hill
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From post #2:
Quote:
It's a whole lot easier to just learn how to compile a kernel with a good guide and do it yourself. If you save your old kernel, you can boot back into it until you get a new good kernel.
That's how you learn. Using someone else's config doesn't teach you about your hardware.
 
Old 07-08-2005, 03:22 AM   #8
uselpa
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Maybe you should make the difference between

1- doing a necessary change to your kernel to activate support for some hardware or tweak a specific option
2- building an ideal kernel, 100% optimized for your machine and without any unneeded parts.

It's easier to start with 1 and to gradually move up to 2. You cannot expect somebody who wants to make a minor change to his kernel to learn and understand all the kernel options before doing anything that is required.
 
Old 07-08-2005, 04:02 AM   #9
Bruce Hill
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I'm hardcore...and you're right...sorry.

So, JustinCoyan, to help with your original question: If you're going to use someone else's config file, it's best to put it with your sources and issue "make oldconfig". If you want to change anything in it, then you would issue "make xconfig" (or gconfig or menuconfig) and make your changes, then continue with compiling and installing the kernel.

Last edited by Bruce Hill; 07-08-2005 at 04:39 AM.
 
  


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