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-   -   cd/dvd not found!! (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-installation-40/cd-dvd-not-found-584582/)

a1ora0 09-14-2007 12:57 AM

cd/dvd not found!!
 
hi..
i got a new system.
core 2 duo (2ghz)
intel g33(mobo)
1gb ram,160 hdisk
liteon dvd rw


i partitioned my harddisk properly..
then wrote it..
then addswap
i formatted the remainin space..

then comes the trouble!!!
in the source media selection
i selected for scan for cd or dvd

then autoscan option ,i chose...

"no IDE/SCSI drive found...."

here i get stuck and i am not able to go ahead with my installation..
can anyone help me out here??

H_TeXMeX_H 09-14-2007 02:38 AM

What Slackware version are you trying to install ? what kernel ?

a1ora0 09-14-2007 05:15 AM

slackware 11..

and the kernel i've no idea!!

i think its the default kernel sata.i!!
i really dont know how do we name kernels and how to look for the name..

H_TeXMeX_H 09-14-2007 05:50 AM

try booting huge26.s just type that in at the boot prompt and it will boot it, for example:
Code:

boot: huge26.s <press Enter>

MQMan 09-14-2007 01:03 PM

Is the DVD connected to IDE or SATA.

I found that Slack 11 will boot from a SATA DVD/CD, but then can't find it. Slack 12 works.

Cheers.

H_TeXMeX_H 09-14-2007 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MQMan (Post 2891920)
Is the DVD connected to IDE or SATA.

I found that Slack 11 will boot from a SATA DVD/CD, but then can't find it. Slack 12 works.

Cheers.

Yeah, that's probably because 2.6.x kernels have much better SCSI support. That's why I recommend the huge26.s kernel on Slack 11.0, and I guess if neither that nor the test26.s work (which I'm reasonable sure one of them will), then go for Slack 12.0.

a1ora0 09-14-2007 09:58 PM

well neither of them worked!!guess i've to go for slack 12..
but how do get to know ,which of the kernels support which combination of hardware? is it just by trying out different kernels on differrent computers?

H_TeXMeX_H 09-15-2007 03:07 AM

Typically newer kernels have better hardware support, and in the case of slackware, choose the huge kernels, because they have most things complied in.

a1ora0 09-17-2007 12:24 PM

wat do you actually mean by huge kernels?

MQMan 09-17-2007 12:42 PM

These are extra kernels on the CDs that have all the device drives built-in, instead of loading them as modules.

But, I don't think that you can get Slack 11 to boot one of these, when booting from the CD itself, as it's 2.4 based.

Cheers.

H_TeXMeX_H 09-17-2007 04:08 PM

both slack 11.0 and 12.0 have the so-called huge kernels ... because they are huge 2.6.x kernels with nearly everything compiled in. 'huge26.s' for slack 11.0 and just 'huge.s' for slack 12.0.

onebuck 09-17-2007 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a1ora0 (Post 2892276)
well neither of them worked!!guess i've to go for slack 12..
but how do get to know ,which of the kernels support which combination of hardware? is it just by trying out different kernels on differrent computers?

Hi,

Welcome to Slackware!

'PV' provides .txt files to give us the desired information. You can read the Slackware 12.0 CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT, UPGRADE.TXT and RELEASE_NOTES to get the background information.

You could also reference 'Slackware-Links' which was compiled from 'Slackware LQ Suggestions Links!' other information.

A good way to know what you should be looking for is to boot the install with a generic-smp kernel and do a 'lspci -vv'. This give you the machine information that you can match to the kernel. This information necessary when you want to custom a kernel to suit your hardware.

a1ora0 09-18-2007 11:44 PM

i am not able to run huge.s nor hugesmp.s!!!

onebuck 09-19-2007 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a1ora0 (Post 2896468)
i am not able to run huge.s nor hugesmp.s!!!


Hi,

Quote:

excerpt from Slackware 12.0 CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT;

It is recommended that you use one of the generic kernels (either the plain
kernel-generic or kernel-generic-smp) for daily use. For most systems,
you should use the generic SMP kernel if it will run, even if your system
is not SMP-capable. Some newer hardware needs the local APIC enabled in
the SMP kernel, and theoretically there should not be a performance penalty
with using the SMP-capable kernel on a uniprocessor machine, as the SMP
kernel tests for this and makes necessary adjustments. Furthermore, the
kernel sources shipped with Slackware 12.0 are configured for SMP usage,
so you won't have to modify those to build external out-of-tree modules
(such as NVidia or ATI proprietary drivers) if you use the SMP kernel.

If you are using one of the non-SMP kernels (huge.s or generic.s) and need
to compile third-party modules (such as the proprietary NVidia driver),
have a look in /extra/linux-2.6.21.5-nosmp-sdk/ for information on what
is needed to build them.

As stated earlier, it is recommended that you use one of the generic kernels
rather than the huge kernels; the huge kernel is primarily intended as
an "installer" and "emergency" kernel in case you forget to make an initrd.
However, if you do use one of the huge kernels, you will likely encounter
errors like this:
kobject_add failed for uhci_hcd with -EEXIST, don't try to register
These occur because the respective drivers are compiled statically into the
huge kernels but udev tries to load them anyway. These errors should be safe
to ignore, but if you really don't want them to appear, you can blacklist the
modules that try to load in /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist. However, make sure you
remove them from the blacklist if you ever decide to use the (recommended)
generic kernels.

As 'PV' states you should be using kernel-generic or kernel-generic-smp for daily use for the reasons given. Preferably the kernel-generic-smp.

What errors are you getting when you try the huge kernels? I'm not sitting nor standing behind you. My crystal ball is cracked and everything is fuzzy or blurry. You will have too give the information that you see from the system.

simcox1 09-19-2007 07:56 AM

So you're now using Slackware 12.0, and when you get to the installation, it can't find your drive? And you've tried both kernels. You could try making a copy of the dvd/cd into a directory, mounting it, and then choosing the option 'Install from a pre-mounted directory'. This would mean installing another distro first. I'm sure there must be another way though.


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