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kikinovak 09-12-2012 10:09 AM

Xfce vs. disk partitions vs. CD-Rom
 
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Hi,

I'm running Slackware 13.37 with Robby Workman's Xfce 4.8, and I'm encountering a curious problem. Two curious problems in fact.

1) I have a multiboot PC with four (Slackware) Linux systems on it. It's partitioned from sda1 to sda10, every system has its own root and /boot partition, and they all share a common swap partition. (If you are wondering what this is good for: this is my dedicated build box.) Now what's very curious is that Thunar, Xfce's file manager, displays all these partitions in the side pane as well as on the desktop. See attached screenshot.

2) What's even more curious: when I edit /etc/fstab and define the static mount point /mnt/cdrom for /dev/cdrom (with the relevant options), I reboot the PC, launch Xfce, insert a CD-Rom or a DVD and... nothing happens. the CD-Rom or the DVD does not appear in Thunar's side pane.

Now is there any way I can switch these two behaviors to something more usable, e. g. show the CD-Rom, but not the whole load of disk partitions?

kikinovak 09-12-2012 10:41 AM

OK, after some more googling and experimenting around, I found the answer to the first of the two problems. I created the file /etc/udev/rules.d/hide-partitions.rules and edited it like this:

Code:

KERNEL=="sda5",ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"
KERNEL=="sda6",ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"
KERNEL=="sda7",ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"
KERNEL=="sda8",ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"
KERNEL=="sda9",ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"
KERNEL=="sda10",ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"

Rebooted and... worked like a charm. Thunar now only displays the actual "system partition" /dev/sda3, and that's it.


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