LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Slackware (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/)
-   -   Working as system adminstrator (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/working-as-system-adminstrator-433580/)

Zmyrgel 04-10-2006 01:47 AM

Working as system adminstrator
 
I'm establishing a limited company with my friend and I'm going to be working as system adminstrator there. It's nothing big but still I'd have enough in my hands on there. I probably have one server machine in my hands which holds the firm's webpages (I need to make these too) and stores the customer info of the firm so obviously I need to work on the security issues on that. Then there will be a computer for office use. I'm leaning heavily to install Slackware on the server machine. I'm still thinking what to put on the "office" machine. Not so important, that one.

So my question is what kind of computer should the server be? Will something like basic 750 Mhz Celeron do the job with 256mb memory? Does even smaller suffice?

And, we probably register a domain name so can I make a secure e-mail addresses which reside on the server and is accessable from anywhere?

What services should be in the server? I'm new to server usage but it will work atleast to store files, publish webpages and offering the e-mail. Should it grant anything else?

I can do the file storing and webpages with samba and apache but how can I do the E-mail?

Then I heard something about MIB:s. There like some daemons who monitor the system and could be made to send me a e-mail when, for example, server shut's down. How they work exactly?

Is there any server specific things I would need to put on cron?


There's a lot of quetions but I'd hope to have answers. If there's something I missed in there, do notify me. :)

Thank you

Zmyrgel

Alien_Hominid 04-10-2006 02:32 AM

For email use sendmail (others will tell you to use qmail, postfix and so on, so you can look at these too), imap and pop3. They are defaults in Slackware so no additional job is required. As well you need database server like mysql (postgresql, firebirdsql) if you plan to make webpages with client data. There was a script in this Slackware forum called like smth similar to good for newbies which would setup mail service, apache with ssl (you will need to generate proper sertificates, however)and mysql in several seconds. Search for it. For web mail access there is squirrelmail, imp in horde framework.

Zmyrgel 04-10-2006 02:49 AM

Ok, thanks.

I tried to put sendmail with sasl2-support on my new homeserver but never got it to work. Gotta keep working on it.


I'll search for that script...

mdarby 04-10-2006 06:06 AM

DO NOT put your customer data on your public webserver. This could lead to Bad Things.



Other than that, if you're only going to have one box running many services, I'd bump up the specs a tad.
Services you'd likely want include email (I prefer Postifx / Courier IMAP), Apache (along with MySQL/PHP or some variant), BIND DNS, SSH, FTP (vsftpd is nice), DHCPd, etc.

Zmyrgel 04-10-2006 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mdarby
DO NOT put your customer data on your public webserver. This could lead to Bad Things.

Yes, I thought that one a little. Not feeling too secure on adding customer data on same thing as network server. But then again we would need to get a extra machine to store the files.



Quote:

Other than that, if you're only going to have one box running many services, I'd bump up the specs a tad.
Services you'd likely want include email (I prefer Postifx / Courier IMAP), Apache (along with MySQL/PHP or some variant), BIND DNS, SSH, FTP (vsftpd is nice), DHCPd, etc.
What's BIND? DNS is other thing I should check. If I register a domain from, for example DynDNS, Do I need a DNS service running?

I'm pretty confused about those domain names.

What setting should I put on my machine as I have now a server at home where I train my linux skills. I use router to forward all the ports which by-pass my firewall into it.

Let's say I registered zmyrgel.kicks-ass.net from DynDNS. Where do I need to put in on my Slackware server to get it to work correctly. I can access my webpage using the domain but how about the sendmail? My machine is called slackbox currently, should it be changed to kicks-ass.net or what?

Could someone give few pointers on the hostname localhost.localdomain things?

Alien_Hominid 04-10-2006 11:41 AM

Change domain to zmyrgel.kicks-ass.net, leave machine name slackbox.

mdarby 04-10-2006 11:51 AM

BIND is the defacto DNS server. You will definately need to run this in order to have a domain name running off of your server. Setting up DNS is pretty tricky; I'd recommend getting O'Reilly's book on BIND. It's configuration can vary widely based on what you want to do.

You won't have to rename your machine to run a domain.

Alien_Hominid 04-10-2006 12:47 PM

Maybe where he buys his domain, he will also get domain name resolving support .

win32sux 04-10-2006 12:56 PM

about the customer data on the same box as the webserver (which i do agree is a very bad idea): if you get yourself a box that's a little more powerful you could use Xen (or another VM) to put customer data and the web server on separate installs, while still on the same box... it's just a thought, though... the ideal would be to have two separate servers, but when you don't have the financial resources for that, a virtual machine can make your day IMHO...

krizzz 04-10-2006 05:13 PM

MIBs don't monitor the systems themselves. MIBs are a the entities that describe the systems for snmp protocol. SNMP is an actual minitoring engine. MIB for the particular system defines what values can be a subject of monitoring (like Interface parameters, cpu usage etc). In fact is not that easy in a practise as all MIBs in the world are organized in huge tree... Monitoring can be pased on periodically polling the device for particular values but also the monitored machine can talk to the server using so called traps.
When using SNMP you must remember that monitored machine has to keep UDP port 161 open which opens a potential hole in your system. Read about Net-SNMP.

vamp 04-10-2006 06:54 PM

The specs of the server are going to totally depend on the number of users this server is going to serve, both internally and externally. my experience is that you'll want to have more ram than just 256. You'll be running your mysql, bind, imap, samba, sendmail, pop3, apache... sometime several instances of these services simultaneously. With the prices of RAM these days dropping, get at least 512, if not more.

Another thing you might want to consider is having an internal server with lower specs that you can use to develop your webpages, keep your customer data, etc, then after enough proofreading/debugging, cvs these changes to your server.

Finally, something else you might want to consider is whether it would be more cost effective to have your webpages hosted externally. Unless you have some serious bandwidth and have some redundancy, you don't want your customers to experience any downtime or lag.

Just some thoughts...


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:44 AM.