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-   -   why slackbuilds? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/why-slackbuilds-801346/)

icecubeflower 04-11-2010 07:49 AM

why slackbuilds?
 
Slackbuilds are really easy but what is the point? I mean it just builds a package and sticks it in /tmp. Why not just have the packages for download? I don't get it.

pixellany 04-11-2010 08:08 AM

Some software needs to be compiled for your specific machine/kernel (or -as a minimum- works better if it is.)

bgeddy 04-11-2010 08:29 AM

Nearly all software depends on other software - dependencies. Often these are not present or there but incorrect versions. Building locally will more often than not check for appropriate dependencies which is very useful. The other alternative is to include dependencies with all packages which is not practical (possibly not even possible) and may still cause version conflicts. There are other localisations which need to be accounted for not to mention customisation options - making software accommodate what you want.

In general building things locally is much safer and more reliable than installing packages from elsewhere - not ignoring the "trust" factor.

Alien Bob 04-11-2010 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by icecubeflower (Post 3931686)
Slackbuilds are really easy but what is the point? I mean it just builds a package and sticks it in /tmp. Why not just have the packages for download? I don't get it.

I assume you are talking about http://slackbuilds.org ? As the name implies, our goal is to have a large repository of build scripts that are well-tested and which you should be able to use with ease on your local system. We are explicitly not interested in creating or hosting the resulting packages.

We host the build scripts which does not require a lot of bandwidth if a lot of users download them. If we were to host the packages that would cost us a lot more in terms of bandwidth and money.

However, we do not mind if others want to host the packages they created with the use of our SlackBuild scripts.

As for other sites than slackbuilds.org - there are several which supply packages along with the build scripts. My own repository, and that of Robby Workman, but also http://slacky.eu and http://gnomeslackbuild.org are examples of that.

Eric

allend 04-11-2010 09:21 AM

Slackbuilds can be customised for local installs (e.g. internationalisation in OpenOffice).
Also Slackbuilds can usually be easily modified to compile new versions of software.

Alvin Chey 04-11-2010 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by icecubeflower (Post 3931686)
Slackbuilds are really easy but what is the point? I mean it just builds a package and sticks it in /tmp. Why not just have the packages for download? I don't get it.

Personally, I find Slackware package system really shine in the context where high-speed, high-quality Internet connection is not available (for example suburban or rural areas that might not have such services).

All I have to have is 1) Slackware Installation CD, 2) Portable harddisk or CD containing all the packages I have prepared using Slackbuild, Slackbuild scripts and source codes.

All I need to do is setup up a computer and install the packages ... all done without Internet access!


With Slackbuild, I could achieve the equivalent of "configure; make install" process and at the same time having the bonus of easily tracking what compile options I've used or what I've installed (by looking at /var/log/packages). And I could easily remove or upgrade the package.

With some software (like OpenOffice.org), Slackbuild scripts actually repackages the binary instead of compiling. But I still get a package at the end. I could just simply install the package like any other packages.


In conclusion, Slackbuild scripts make sense to me because:
1. Helps me make packages and be less dependent of high-speed internet connection. Can easily share packages across computers too.
2. Install, upgrade or remove any software packages the same way (regardless or how the software is distributed or packaged upstream)
3. Document compile time options. Track what software was installed and what file was added (via /var/log/packages)

brianL 04-11-2010 09:55 AM

Quote:

why slackbuilds?

Because it's fun, and better than TV, watching things compile. Sitting with eyes glued to the terminal, trying to read all that stuff about "dereferencing type-punned wotsits breaking aliassed thingies". :)

icecubeflower 04-11-2010 10:11 AM

Thx everybody. Hey just so everybody knows I was assuming there were really good reasons for it and I just didn't know anything about it so I asked. I wasn't suggesting they get rid of slackbuild scripts and go with packages like no one ever thought of it before.

So scripts are cheaper to host than packages and it can work better if it's compiled to my specific kernel and the versions of the dependencies I have. Got it.

igadoter 04-11-2010 10:55 AM

Hi,

If we forget of all about that rather mysterious 'sources'
'binaries' using slackbuild scripts is an installation procedure, nothing else.

I'm thinking about making a script, some a kind of 'pkgtool' but
aimed at working with slackbuild.org and other
slackbuild script's repositories. Any idea?


Also I read somewhere that there are apps which should be compiled with disabled ACPI function (in BIOS). Know why? I can only guess.

Alien Bob 04-11-2010 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by igadoter (Post 3931830)
I'm thinking about making a script, some a kind of 'pkgtool' but aimed at working with slackbuild.org and other slackbuild script's repositories. Any idea?

Yes, look at http://sbopkg.org/ - Chess Griffin already implemented that idea.

Eric

ponce 04-11-2010 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brianL (Post 3931777)
Because it's fun, and better than TV, watching things compile. Sitting with eyes glued to the terminal, trying to read all that stuff about "dereferencing type-punned wotsits breaking aliassed thingies". :)

+1 :D

MannyNix 04-11-2010 12:11 PM

Now that the OP solved his question...

Quote:

Originally Posted by brianL (Post 3931777)
Because it's fun, and better than TV, watching things compile. Sitting with eyes glued to the terminal, trying to read all that stuff about "dereferencing type-punned wotsits breaking aliassed thingies". :)

I find that watching things compile is similar to watching an aquarium (assuming no errors and -minus the boredom to death of fishes). Gentoo and FreeBSD are also good for this type of entertainment.
Cheers!

damgar 04-11-2010 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MannyNix (Post 3931907)
Now that the OP solved his question...



I find that watching things compile is similar to watching an aquarium (assuming no errors). Gentoo and FreeBSD are also good for this type of entertainment.
Cheers!

I agree, but I'm not sure that's not an indicator of something being wrong with me! :)


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