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Old 03-09-2007, 09:37 PM   #91
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcmiller
I think Slackware is perfect for a rank beginner if that person has a willingness to learn and is willing to move forward knowing that every issue has a answer and a helpful slacker willing to lend a hand.
If the rank beginner has the willingness to learn and is not easily frustrated then Slackware is a good first choice.
We Slackers are a bit different from other computer users, we thrive on a challenge, we know how to solve problems. When we can't solve a problem we will tenaciously search for an answer or experiment until we are victorious.
Not all computer users have the Slackware mentality. Slackware is a fantastic learning experience, imho.
After using many distros over the years I am of the opinion that Slackware is the best OS out there.............period.
 
Old 03-10-2007, 06:31 AM   #92
gargamel
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*lol* Regarding the name, the comparisons with cars and fashion and diseases are TOO good! I visited the thread an hour ago, but can only reply now, that I can breathe again... 8-)

So.

Why do I like Slackware?

1. Main reason: It's very, very well maintained.

2. Continuity: The basic system and the locations where configuration files etc. are kept, remain stable over years. Upgrades go smooth, nothing breaks, and config files that should be checked for changes are tagged.
Once you know where to do something for an older Slackware version your chance is very high that you can do the same thing in a new version, without learning everything anew.
This is a major difference when compared to distros like Red Hat or SuSE! They re-organized the file structures many times; it's a bit more stable now, thanks to LSB.

3. No vendor patches: Although the distribution isn't packed with as many applications as other distributions, and although the known repositories contain less stuff than their Debian or SuSE equivalents, it is in principle possible to get more stuff running on Slackware than on other distributions. Because you can compile just about everything from the original source (if it is available). On other distributions many packages must be patched by the vendor in order to fit into their philosophy. This creates dependencies. Occasionally it happens that you cannot compile or install a piece of software without the appropriate vendor patch. So you'll have to wait until it is available.

4. Consistency: The collection of software included with Slackware is thoroughly selected to make a productive mulit-purpose system that can be used for servers and desktops alike.

5. Ease of administration: Although there is now fancy GUI tool for administration, like YaST or so, the administration and configuration of Slackware is usually pretty straightforward. This is, however, partly because Pat V. decided to follow the BSD approach instead of System V. One consequence is that if you install server programs you'll usually have to fiddle around a bit with automatic startup scripts for selected run-levels, as most daemon programs for Linux are programmed with System V and LSB in mind. This isn't a big deal, usually, however.

Although off-topic/not asked, I like to add two points why I haven't given up using SuSE, side by side with Slackware.

Continuity: Upgrades modify configuration files appropriately, automatically.
Example use case: Web server. Some years ago I ran an Apache web server on one of my machines. It was Apache HTTPD 1.3. Then a new SuSE version came out, with Apache 2.0 as the default. After the fully automatic upgrade the webserver ran smoothly with the new version. I didn't have to change anything (and I wasn't angry about that, because the config files of Apache 1.3 and 2.0 are pretty different in some parts, and I had no motivation to go through all the hassle of setting it all up again...). That was comfortable. Migration from older to newer versions of programs are very simple with SuSE, and often work totally unattended.
This a completely different philosophy than in Slackware, but for my use case it was just the right thing at that time.

X configuration: Some people here said that X can be configured automatically using the tools that come with X.org. My experience is: This has never really worked. With SuSE's X configuration tool SaX2, however, I always got a fully functional and highly optimised X configuration. Although Slackware has become my preferred system, I still use SuSE to generate an X configuration, that I copy over to Slackware, then. The result just works, while the X.org tools just produce garbage. No better, than what I can achieve myself with Vim. ;-)

So my point is: A good distribution is one that is well maintained over a long time, inherently consistent and well supported. This is where SuSE is good, and Slackware excels.
It's up to you to choose among the distributions that are well-maintained the one that will fulfill your needs best. In principle you can get every distro to suit just about every need, but with more or less effort. I'd not use Slackware for a web server, because I wouldn't want to miss the comfort of SuSE for upgrades here. For just about everything else Slackware has become my favourite.

gargamel
 
Old 03-10-2007, 08:11 AM   #93
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gargamel


X configuration: Some people here said that X can be configured automatically using the tools that come with X.org. My experience is: This has never really worked. With SuSE's X configuration tool SaX2, however, I always got a fully functional and highly optimised X configuration. Although Slackware has become my preferred system, I still use SuSE to generate an X configuration, that I copy over to Slackware, then. The result just works, while the X.org tools just produce garbage. No better, than what I can achieve myself with Vim. ;-)
I must respectfully disagree with you on this one. xorgconfig has never failed for me in Slackware, I find it a lot easier to switch monitors in Slackware than other distros. Why use Suse to do what Slackware can accomplish easily?
 
Old 03-10-2007, 08:50 AM   #94
gargamel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest
I must respectfully disagree with you on this one. xorgconfig has never failed for me in Slackware, I find it a lot easier to switch monitors in Slackware than other distros. Why use Suse to do what Slackware can accomplish easily?
The success of xorgconfig, xorgsetup etc. heavily depends on your hardware. No wheelmouse or trackball has ever worked in my systems without manual tweaking after using these "tools". While I am not afraid of config files, Xorg is a science in itself (ok: nothing compares to Sendmail...).

So, as you suggest, I don't use SuSE for something Slackware can accomplish easily. I use it for things that Slackware doesn't do, at all, at the moment. And I don't actually blame this on Slackware, but on X.org. AFAIK they are finally working on that, it seems. They promise better tools and hardware detection for forthcoming versions.
Learning Linux: Ok. Learning the concepts behind X11: Ok. But learning, how to optimize the configuration for exactly one graphics adapter? No. I don't want that. That's why I like SaX2, and none of the tools packaged with X.org comes even close to it.

But I think I made it clear, that these are minor shortcomings, given the many advantages of our favourite distro.

And: What's wrong to use the best tool for a given task available? Isn't that what *nix is all about?

gargamel
 
Old 03-10-2007, 09:14 AM   #95
hitest
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by gargamel

But I think I made it clear, that these are minor shortcomings, given the many advantages of our favourite distro.

And: What's wrong to use the best tool for a given task available? Isn't that what *nix is all about?

gargamel
Interesting post. Thanks for the reply. I guess I've been lucky so far with xorgconfig and Slackware (I run slack on older PCs, not cutting edge units).
Point well-taken, given your experience with your hardware, yes, it makes perfect sense to use the *nix tools available to accomplish a task that needs to be done.
 
Old 03-10-2007, 11:22 AM   #96
manwichmakesameal
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Slacker for life

Quote:
honestly, when i first tried slackware (coming from mandrake and red hat) i didn't really expect to get sucked into it like i did, i think i just installed it "to see if i could" because i had been fed the "slackware is difficult" myth over and over again and wanted to see what all the fuss was about... at first it was a horrible experience but eventually i "got slack" and i never went back to red hat or mandrake again...
That is the same exact thing that happened to me. I always heard people say "Slackware is for crazy people", so I tried it. Still slackin'.
 
Old 03-10-2007, 11:46 AM   #97
coldbeer
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Because it doesn't do anything I don't tell it to do!

(and its not Microsoft Windows)

 
Old 03-10-2007, 04:13 PM   #98
daBittweiler
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My reply to: Why do you like Slackware?

Thou I haven't used it in awhile, consistency is still in there.
I've used many iso in the last couple of months trying the other linux distro's saving Slack as a last option. To me Slackware doesn't have all the bloat that's bundled into alot of the other Linux OSes. I love any of the *BSD's and Slackware fits into that mode of thinking.

I like to just install the base system with x11 then add whatever I really plan to use I hate to have to uninstall apps that I don't want. That and I remember Slackware 3.1 release as the best Linux back in the day. Basically it just works.

A word of wisdom:
You must know the ledge of wise and dome,
to understand your culture of freedom ;-)

Last edited by daBittweiler; 03-10-2007 at 04:20 PM.
 
Old 03-10-2007, 06:13 PM   #99
bgeddy
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Why I hate Slackware and Love XP - an analogy.

(Anyone with children should understand this (and hopefully the sarcasm)).

I think installing an OS is a lot like bringing up children, ( I know this is weird but hear me out), and so I will set out to compare Slackware with XP - as Slackware is my main source of experience of a linux distro I will use it for my example - perhaps other distros would equally fit this scenario but I doubt it.

Modern day parenting is a lot different from how it used to be. From the outset, why should we put in any effort in installing a suitable partner or even knowing what is going on in their minds ? Simply load it and don't worry, all will be well. Then - magically - an offspring is produced without us having to worry about where it really came from or what happened in the process. We really had no control over this - it just happened.

Next there is the period of development of our child. Why bother getting involved with this - it takes effort - better to just leave it to someone else and again - all will be well. Do not be concerned about getting to know our sibling or what is really going on - these things are not important. As long as we don't have to put in any effort - thats the main thing. Everyone else is doing things this way so it must be OK.

Unfortunately an important part of this ongoing process is the never ending series of protections that we should apply to the child to protect it from threats but this is unavoidable and, although a pain, should be accepted and paid for because the world is a scary place.

Do not be concerned with unexplainable noises and manic behavior, even when our youngster is at rest, as this is just the way things are. Again - do not be concerned with the inner workings of these things - you have no control over them and so they are not worth worrying about. We can always just choose to ignore this stage and start again from scratch.

Through the following years sudden changes will happen and what little we were allowed to know about our child will suddenly be in a completely different place. This need not concern us as things just are this way - this is known as an "upgrade" and all the smart people do it.

By no means expect any kind of control over the child as this just will not be allowed - so it's not worth worrying about.
(It should be expected that there will be unforeseen expenses - sometimes large - associated with this.)

There will become a time when the child will be difficult to rouse in the mornings and wont want to go to sleep - this is OK - just grin and bear it - this is normal. In fact, as time goes by, expect a noticeable lack of response - this is nothing to worry about.

When the time comes for our little one to become less dependant on us do not ever worry about where they are or what they are doing - this is wasted effort - and everyone else goes through this so why worry?

Errant behavior may develop when the child has to interact with others and we may be asked to sign error reports from the controller. My advice would be to simply tick "Don't send" as an option and again - don't worry.

It may at times seem like everything is beyond our control and we are not being told what is really going on. Again - do not give this any concern - such effort is wasted and fruitless. These feelings of alienation and lack of control are completely normal - just go with it.

If this advice is followed life will be simple - thats why I hate Slackware and love Windows....

Regards,

Mr.Tongue in cheek..
 
Old 03-11-2007, 09:21 AM   #100
hitest
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I love the fact that everything just works in Slackware. The change over to DST went without a hitch. I also greatly appreciate the fact that I never have maintenance issues with my three Slackware boxes; they function perfectly:-)
 
Old 05-21-2007, 05:12 AM   #101
morghanphoenix
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Only one thing I miss.

For the most part I love Slackware. Runs much faster than any other distro I've tried. I can actually compile something from source on a fresh install. It comes with a good variety of window managers/desktop environments out of the box. There are packages for everything you absolutely must have and they tend to be more stable overall. It doesn't get in your way trying to guess what you want it to do. It defaults to command line. And many many more reasons.
The only thing I really miss is dropping a CD or DVD in the drive and having it mount automatically. Don't ask me why, I keep terminals open all over the place, not that hard to mount it manually, but for some reason it really bothers me that I have to do that.
 
Old 05-21-2007, 09:28 AM   #102
jets0n
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Because it's easy to set up once you know how, makes you learn things and everything works (until you break something ). I also like the fact that packages are mostly vanilla and that there is no branding.
 
  


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