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Old 04-30-2008, 09:13 PM   #1
okos
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Which set of runlevel scripts does slackware use at boot?


Hi
Im just learning about runlevel scripts and noticed two sets of them.
One set is in /etc and the second in /etc/rc.d


Quote:
ls /etc | grep rc
4.0K dialogrc
8.0K imrc
4.0K inputrc
4.0K minirc.dfl
4.0K nail.rc
1.5K rc.d
0 rc0.d
0 rc1.d
0 rc2.d
0 rc3.d
0 rc4.d
0 rc5.d
0 rc6.d
4.0K screenrc
24K slrn.rc
4.0K slsh.rc
8.0K wgetrc
4.0K xpdfrc
4.0K ytalkrc
And the /etc/rc.d directory
Quote:
~$ ls /etc/rc.d | grep d
0 rc0.d
0 rc1.d
0 rc2.d
0 rc3.d
0 rc4.d
0 rc5.d
0 rc6.d
Why two sets? And which ones are in use at boot?
 
Old 04-30-2008, 09:17 PM   #2
Bruce Hill
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The file which starts the initialization process is /sbin/init,
which takes it's orders from /etc/inittab
 
Old 04-30-2008, 09:20 PM   #3
jailbait
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The runlevel scripts are in /etc/rc.d. The other things that you list are not runlevel scripts. They are configuration files for various pieces of software.

---------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 05-01-2008, 01:28 AM   #4
okos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jailbait View Post
The runlevel scripts are in /etc/rc.d. The other things that you list are not runlevel scripts. They are configuration files for various pieces of software.

---------------
Steve Stites
The only thing is that both /etc/rc3.d and /etc/rc.d/rc3.d have the same symlinks.

So, what is the easiest way to keep vmware server from starting at boot? Should I break the symlinks? I also have vmware in rc2, and I think also in rc1
Quote:
ls /etc/rc.d/rc3.d
total 0
0 K08vmware 0 S09hsf 0 S90vmware
How would you recommend to setup vmware server on demand?

Thanks
okos
 
Old 05-01-2008, 02:23 AM   #5
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okos View Post
So, what is the easiest way to keep vmware server from starting at boot? Should I break the symlinks? I also have vmware in rc2, and I think also in rc1
Don't break the symlinks.

The best way is to remove the executable attribute on the script that the symlinks point to.

Eg:

# chmod -x /etc/rc.d/init.d/rc.vmware

This is the best way, because you don't have to go back and recreate the symlinks when you want to use it again.
 
Old 05-01-2008, 02:26 AM   #6
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okos View Post
How would you recommend to setup vmware server on demand?
Copy the script from /etc/rc.d/init.d to /usr/local/bin. That way, you can call it whenever you like and still have the ability to run it on bootup if you wish.
 
Old 05-01-2008, 11:33 PM   #7
okos
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Lightbulb I see the light!

Alright I got it!
I don't know why but rc(0-6).d is in both /etc and /etc/rc.d as I said previously. In addition, init.d is also in both /etc and /etc/rc.d. I changed mode -x vmware in /etc/init.d and vmware still booted. So I just changed vmware to stop execution.
I guess ill find out next boot.
See my symlinks:
Quote:
/etc/rc.d/rc3.d$ ls -la
total 1.5K
0 drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 136 2008-04-26 14:26 .
1.5K drwxr-xr-x 10 root root 1.8K 2008-04-27 16:22 ..
0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 23 2008-04-26 14:26 K08vmware -> /etc/rc.d/init.d/vmware
0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 15 2008-04-20 21:42 S09hsf -> /etc/init.d/hsf
0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 23 2008-04-26 14:26 S90vmware -> /etc/rc.d/init.d/vmware
Ill let you know what happens.

Why are there duplicates in /etc and /etc/rc.d ? I know jailbait stated,"The other things that you list are not runlevel scripts. They are configuration files for various pieces of software." But the files look identical to me.

Thanks a bunch.
okos
 
Old 05-01-2008, 11:54 PM   #8
Bruce Hill
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Slackware does not use SysV style init scripts, so those
must be created and symlinked ... here's an explanation.
 
Old 05-02-2008, 12:31 AM   #9
okos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Hill View Post
Slackware does not use SysV style init scripts, so those
must be created and symlinked ... here's an explanation.
Thanks Bruce for your input.

IC So the /etc/init.d was not originally part of the system on a fresh install.

I installed the hsf modem driver long before installing vmware. Since there are only three symlinks, perhaps the linuxant installer created the directories including the /etc/rc(0-6).d and /etc/init.d ?

Thanks a bunch

okos
 
Old 05-02-2008, 01:07 AM   #10
Bruce Hill
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Have you read this?
Code:
less /etc/init.d/README.functions

If you're reading this in /etc/init.d/, Slackware's real init directory is
/etc/rc.d/.  Maybe you already knew this, but it never hurts to say.  :-)

This script was taken from Fedora (and is presumably licensed under the GPL).
While I don't see Slackware init scripts making much use of it (but use it
if you wish), some third party init scripts (such as for commercial software
designed to run on Red Hat based systems) expect this script and use it in
their own init scripts, so it's a good idea to make it available here.

These functions are provided solely for commercial (or other) software that
expects to find "Red Hat-isms".  I wouldn't use them to write new init
scripts (personally), but if you've had experience with them in the past
and like them, by all means feel free.

It's planned to continue support for them.
 
Old 05-02-2008, 11:15 PM   #11
okos
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Bruce,
Thank you for your help!
I understand.
It is setup for the purpose of some software.
Thanks guys for the learning experience.
 
Old 05-03-2008, 12:39 AM   #12
Bruce Hill
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I think rkelsen's method of moving the script might work well, also.
Have you tried that?

Glad you got it working. I've never tried VMWare, just because of the
issues you've experienced with it. Seems that when I need Windows to
use Photoshop and InDesign, it's better just to boot into Windows;
even as much as I disdain Mickey$oft ... it's a criminal company.
 
Old 05-03-2008, 02:06 AM   #13
okos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Hill View Post
I think rkelsen's method of moving the script might work well, also.
Have you tried that?
This worked
chmod -x /etc/rc.d/init.d/vmware
vmware did also install in /usr/bin

Quote:
Glad you got it working. I've never tried VMWare, just because of the
issues you've experienced with it. Seems that when I need Windows to
use Photoshop and InDesign, it's better just to boot into Windows;
even as much as I disdain Mickey$oft ... it's a criminal company.
I was able to get vmware to work with the 2.6.25 kernel at Lenrek's blog

I have not tried it yet, but now I want to get vmware to boot my xp partition.
I do not like going back and forth and rebooting my system when I need something from xp. However now that Ive used Linux for about a year, I do not go back to windows so often.

On the other hand, something that is memory intensive such as photo etiting, it is probably better reboot.

Thanks again.

Last edited by okos; 05-03-2008 at 02:09 AM.
 
Old 05-03-2008, 02:19 AM   #14
Bruce Hill
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I thought the purpose of installing VMWare was to install
Windows in it so you didn't have to 'boot into Windows'.
 
Old 05-03-2008, 09:20 PM   #15
okos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Hill View Post
I thought the purpose of installing VMWare was to install
Windows in it so you didn't have to 'boot into Windows'.
vmware will boot a live cd or you can set it up to boot the windows partition while still in linux. I used to run different linux live cd's while in xp long before actually installing linux on my system.

There are several advantages to using vmware.
1. I have not gotten that far yet because it takes some time to configure but, you will not have to log out of linux and reboot your system to go into windows. The windows partition will boot directly in the vmware window.

2. It is good for checking, editing, or running a live cd without burning it on a cd. You can save, edit, delete files just as in any normal os.

3. With dhcp it will have its own ip address on the lan. You can test your firewall for security purposes.

4. You can run the operating system with out having any effect on your system other then its usage of memory and I assume take up some of your cpu processing. The os on vmware is completely isolated from the os on your computer.

5. I guess you could play against yourself on a lan game

I hope this is informative.
okos
 
  


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