LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-21-2008, 10:45 AM   #16
trickykid
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2001
Posts: 24,133

Rep: Reputation: 199Reputation: 199

I use neither. I only download packages when I'm emailed about security risks from the slackware mailing lists. I then read if they affect my machines or users, if they do, I test on a machine before applying to others. The time it takes to install a few packages per month on average is basically near to nothing.

I'm not the latest and greatest tinker with every package type of person. I install what works and what I've been using for years. I can do most everything from the command line so all those fancy GUI packages/programs I rarely bother with anyways.
 
Old 08-21-2008, 11:55 AM   #17
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,273

Rep: Reputation: 587Reputation: 587Reputation: 587Reputation: 587Reputation: 587Reputation: 587
Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by trickykid View Post
I use neither. I only download packages when I'm emailed about security risks from the slackware mailing lists. I then read if they affect my machines or users, if they do, I test on a machine before applying to others. The time it takes to install a few packages per month on average is basically near to nothing.

I'm not the latest and greatest tinker with every package type of person. I install what works and what I've been using for years. I can do most everything from the command line so all those fancy GUI packages/programs I rarely bother with anyways.
That's what I do. The security mailing list and the CLI keep my Slackware boxes secure and up to date. It isn't hard or time consuming to download several security patches and type: # upgradepkg *.tgz
 
Old 08-21-2008, 02:45 PM   #18
saulgoode
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 255

Rep: Reputation: 120Reputation: 120
I use installpkg. What are these slapt-get and slackpkg of which you speak?
 
Old 08-21-2008, 03:58 PM   #19
oldfolio
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
glore2002 asks:

Quote:
How do you keep a local mirror of .../patches/packages? How is that done?
and GazL mentioned an rsync script for doing this, but couldn't remember where it could be found.

Eric Hameleers (Alien BOB) maintains a script that does this. It is his rsync_slackware_patches.sh script that can be found in the tools directory of his wiki. (Alien BOB's scripts have proved invaluable to me on numerous occasions.)
 
Old 08-21-2008, 05:54 PM   #20
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 3,482

Rep: Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534
I do not use either package.

I am uncomfortable with automatic updates and installations. I disliked that option in Windows and I dislike the option in Slackware too. Even within individual apps, such as Firefox, I disable all such automatation.

I maintain my own local mirror of the Slackware tree. I use my own modified rsync script originally written by Eric. (Thank you Eric!). Refer to oldfolio's post for a link to the original script.

I run the rsync script daily through cron.

I receive email notifications when patches are issued.

I use a shell script that compares the patches list with what I have installed. I used the script posted by urka58 here at LQ to expand upon and create my own cross-check script:

[http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...0#post3005790]

My shell script provides me an additional message of whether the original stock package is installed. That is, if the patch is not installed but I do not have the original stock package installed, then I need not worry about installing the patched package.

I always manually install packages and patches.

The Slackware mirrors do not maintain previous versions of patched packages. I modified Eric's original rsync script such that when I synchronize and download patches, I do not delete any previous versions of patches. This allows me to revert to a previous known good package when unexpected regressions appear. I recall having to do this at least once with samba. A new samba patch was released a few weeks later.

I maintain a text file listing all non-stock Slackware packages I have compiled and installed. T3slider posted a shell script to provide this feature and is discussed at:

[https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...kages-642787/]

I run this shell script hourly through cron. My modified version of the script maintains the file in two different locations, once each on each internal hard drive in my box. I run the script hourly only because I tend to move in spurts when I compile and install new packages.

I once used kslackcheck but that program is no longer maintained. I liked that little program because I was provided a nice list of what was not installed. However, my shell scripts all do this for me now.

Writing this response took more time that what I actually devote toward maintaining patches and updates. The scripts and cron automate most of the process. Although I manually update patches, only a few are issued at any one time.
 
Old 08-22-2008, 04:28 AM   #21
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,134
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I wouldn't call using slackpkg "automatic updating and installation". When you run slackpkg update, it checks the changelogs. When you run slackpkg upgrade-all, it pops up a ncurses or whatever box showing what's available, and you can select or deselect whatever you want. It's convenient and seems reliable, but not automatic. You still have control.
 
Old 08-22-2008, 10:43 PM   #22
shadowsnipes
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,442

Rep: Reputation: 70
I like slackpkg. It has a lot of uses other than keeping up with updates, such as generating a list of non-slackware packages.

By the way, glore2002, once you have a local mirror setup using Eric's script, you can easily configure slackpkg to use it as your source if desired. I show how to do this and other things with slackpkg in my Slackware Upgrade HowTo.
 
Old 08-23-2008, 11:07 AM   #23
glore2002
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Distribution: Debian Lenny AMD64
Posts: 506

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 32
Thank you!

Thank you friends!

Very clear explanation.

I really appreciate your help!
Glore2002.-
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slackpkg: missing something in /usr/libexec/slackpkg/functions.d/dialog-functions.sh michelino Slackware 4 03-20-2007 01:22 PM
slackpkg moob8 Slackware 1 10-01-2006 04:46 AM
Slackpkg? vharishankar Slackware 13 08-04-2006 10:10 PM
/etc/slapt-getrc modification fails to influence slapt-get timsch75 Slackware 1 04-07-2004 09:48 AM
slapt-get, swaret, or SlackPkg ??? GloVe Slackware 2 10-05-2003 01:11 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:31 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration