LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-06-2006, 04:04 PM   #16
Penguin of Wonder
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: West Virginia
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 1,249

Rep: Reputation: 45

Quote:
Originally Posted by byte weaver
Do any people here have experience with customizing their system with the latest and greatest stuff?

Is that even possible?
Sounds like somebody wishes thier distro was source based. Your a bad slacker
 
Old 09-06-2006, 06:12 PM   #17
MannyNix
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: ~
Distribution: Slackware -current, OpenBSD
Posts: 449

Rep: Reputation: 41
Thanks jong357, i really apreciate your help, no pressure on uploading your files, do it when you can, take your time. I got a crappy website at http://members.freewebs.com/ at least it's free
Thanks for sharing your custom work/knowledge, it seems an original and fun way to enjoy our fav distro and learning at the same time
 
Old 09-06-2006, 06:29 PM   #18
MannyNix
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: ~
Distribution: Slackware -current, OpenBSD
Posts: 449

Rep: Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penguin of Wonder
Sounds like somebody wishes thier distro was source based. Your a bad slacker
heh, you're kidding right? or trolling (no offense) but i don't see how wanting to customize their system with "the latest and greatest stuff" means they have to run a source based distro
and btw, some ports in gentoo are kinda old, so they are not the latest (as an example)
Quote:
Gentoo tends to be lag a bit behind in what they consider "stable", so its a good idea to first add..
from amarok website
well... nevermind, who cares anyway
 
Old 09-06-2006, 06:57 PM   #19
jong357
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: Columbus, OH
Distribution: DIYSlackware
Posts: 1,914

Rep: Reputation: 52
I've uploaded just the scripts for "base". I'm uploading a scripts/source tarball in a few minutes. That site only allows 25MB uploads, so I'll have to segment it..

You can get as bleeding edge as you want. I've updated the README on the previous page concerning this. I don't think it's a good idea to go hard core with gcc/glibc/binutils... Other than that. you can build the latest versions of everything pretty much...

I've removed the source from:

kernel
glibc
binutils
gcc

Sorry for hijacking the thread too. :-) I asumed the OP got his/her answer already.

Last edited by jong357; 09-06-2006 at 07:47 PM.
 
Old 09-07-2006, 04:22 AM   #20
MannyNix
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: ~
Distribution: Slackware -current, OpenBSD
Posts: 449

Rep: Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jong357
Sorry for hijacking the thread too. :-) I asumed the OP got his/her answer already.
I'm sorry too, but i also agree about the answer.

jong357, thanks so much for taking the time to upload your work and share your skills, i've been curious about it since i saw your profile about a DIY-Slacky.
Now that you've been kind enough to fulfill my request i feel overwhelmed about how much work it is, how much time it takes and mostly how little i know!
As you say, it needs some time but i'll definitely give it a try.
Got all the files, thanks again!
You guys should check again http://www.4shared.com/dir/722630/9c4d1565/sharing.html
It's full of goodies!

ps. Just wiped out FreeBSD to try Crux some of you may like it
 
Old 09-08-2006, 12:57 AM   #21
Penguin of Wonder
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: West Virginia
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 1,249

Rep: Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyslack
heh, you're kidding right? or trolling (no offense) but i don't see how wanting to customize their system with "the latest and greatest stuff" means they have to run a source based distro
and btw, some ports in gentoo are kinda old, so they are not the latest (as an example) from amarok website
well... nevermind, who cares anyway
No, I was joking. Trolling pisses me off, so I always try to keep things in good humor. As far as Gentoo goes I never suggested you try Gentoo, though it is source based. There are others out there too.

I will have to apoligize though, upon second glance I realized I have quoted the wrong part of your message, which is probably where you came up with most of your responce (which had me confused till now). Its late so I'll skip quoting you again but you mentioned compiling your whole system after upgrading GCC, thats where I got what I said. The latest and greatest part had nothing to do with my comment.

Just as a p.s. though, I've noticed after hanging around Gentoo for a time, that most Gentoo-ers actually keep thier systems fairly far from the latest and greatest. They tend upgrade what they want and forget the rest exists, commands like "emerge --update --newuse --deep world" are the kind you hear people bragging about never running. (Which I can't blame them, it has a tendency to break your system if It's been a while)

Last edited by Penguin of Wonder; 09-08-2006 at 12:58 AM.
 
Old 09-09-2006, 04:21 AM   #22
byte weaver
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
Posts: 27

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyslack
heh, you're kidding right? or trolling (no offense) but i don't see how wanting to customize their system with "the latest and greatest stuff" means they have to run a source based distro
I had no clue that Slackware was a binary-only distro, and that it's considered "trolling" if you'd like to keep your system up-to-date.

Frankly, after 2 years of Linux, I got fed up with the whole thing, especially the attitude that some Linux folk have towards users. Like, in this here thread, I expected to get serious answers on which GCC to use to have the least trouble. Now I learn that I'm not supposed to do that, along with the allegation that I'm a troll. Nice!

Recently, I deleted Slackware and installed FreeBSD instead, to try a different type of Unix. At least the BSD community seems more friendly, so I'll give it a go.
 
Old 09-09-2006, 10:43 AM   #23
jong357
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: Columbus, OH
Distribution: DIYSlackware
Posts: 1,914

Rep: Reputation: 52
Oh.... Come on guys... This is getting a little out of hand... No one really insulted anyone... Peguin of Wonder apologized and mannyslack was defending you. He was implying that POW was a troll, not you. I think you've misunderstood entirely.

And ALL distro's are SOURCE BASED. These binary packages just don't automagically appear out of thin air. In order to make a binary package, you compile from source. You can update Slackware in anyway you see fit. Once it hit's your box, it's your distro.

And you'll get attitudes from any NIX forum be it BSD or Linux. Actually, Some BSD'ers tend to have a superority complex IMO when it comes to Linux and it's users. You can't escape it no matter where you go...

To answer your question directly, you can use whatever version of GCC you want. The only strike against using the latest is that your going to have to start patching some source code eventually. There have been alot of API changes in general with GCC-4.x... I like to give developers atleast a year to play catch up before I start using a new MAJ version compiler. If you don't mind patching, then by all means, use gcc-4.1.1.... I prefer 3.4.6 myself. It's a rock solid compiler.

If you are using glibc-2.4 then you will probably most defenately want to use gcc-4.1.x.... Take some of the new features for example in gcc-4.1.x... -fstack-protector and -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2.. Glibc-2.4 supports these new features whereas 2.3.6 has minimal to no support.

Last edited by jong357; 09-09-2006 at 11:03 AM.
 
Old 09-09-2006, 02:03 PM   #24
Southpaw76
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Distribution: Slackware-13
Posts: 146

Rep: Reputation: 15
I have to agreee with you Dr.Jong (heh,heh), no matter whether your using *BSD or Linux, you will always at some point run into people who seem to think "how dare you ask that question". However, after having used Gentoo, Slackware, and FreeBSD for quite some time I have to say that although FreeBSD is a rock solid distro, and it most definitely makes a great server, it isn't quite as ready for the desktop as Linux is...

On the other hand I kind of like the configuration process on a FreeBSD kernel as opposed to a Linux kernel sometimes. Lastly, so that this post is relevant to this thread, I have to agree with you on GCC versions. Although I haven't had extensive use with the GCC-4xx, and although most distro's including GNU themselves have marked GCC-4 stable, I've been pretty happy with with using GCC-3.4, whether it's FreeBSD, Gentoo, or Slackware
 
Old 09-09-2006, 09:55 PM   #25
byte weaver
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
Posts: 27

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
GCC 4.1.1 definitely works much better than 4.0.3 for instance; much code that wouldn't compile with 4.0.3 compiles fine with 4.1.1.

Slackware is by far the easiest distro to handle; however, the whole dependency handling problems of Linux are still there. Package-based distros with built-in update mechanism like SuSE Linux don't work too well. SuSE could be great if its packages were actually tested; this is a great plus of Slackware; which just works out of the box. But when you run into problems on any Linux, things can get really complicated. And some packages on linuxpackages.net for Slackware aren't clean; the next time I use Slackware, I won't install any of the bigger ones, and instead compile them from source. There should be a system to install the whole dependency tree of an application (like with the ports system on FreeBSD), this could make things a lot easier.

After using FreeBSD now for a couple of days, I see that their package system is in principle well thought out (i.e. the ports system), but it can happen often that things aren't available on servers, versions have been updated without correcting the ports information, or that some security concern prevents the installation of an application. But the ports collection is huge, so many things do install fine.

FreeBSD interests me more architecture-wise, b/c it's not a Linux!
Like, the driver system is very interesting: you just need to edit one file, and boom, you can load a different set of drivers at startup. My impression from Linux was that it's always necessary to make a custom kernel when you need a new driver. In FreeBSD, it's just editing a file. Some things like services are a little more complicated than on Linux.

So everything has its advantages and disadvantages, I guess.

But no matter which kind of these modern UNIXes you use, you always crash into problems left and right, and that's not good for users. My profession is software development, and not a single one of our customers would accept if we made only a single of the mistakes mentioned; that's because our company is small. Our company uses Windows, because it's much easier to use and maintain than any of these UNIXes. Thank god I know AIX and Solaris as well, and know that there are indeed UNIXes which come with no problems that cannot be overcome.

One of my previous employers used SuSE Linux always unpatched, because he feared to break it, but he failed to see that it just doesn't work right out of the box. Developing with broken compilers isn't fun ...

(BTW, there I can mention right away that I had only problems with GCC 3.x, those just don't work; try enabling the optimizer for i686 on some code and these compilers crash)

But I'm optimistic that overall quality of the free systems will still grow, with time.

If I were to decide which OS to use in some company, they wouldn't have gotten past the evaluation stage.

(I say this only because I want free UNIXes for home users! So that the home user doesn't have to buy any of the cash cows, be it Windows or any other system like that; or just think about small businesses or low budget opportunities. This all must be tackled sometime; it's not good that the big industry is trying to take away power from the users and sparetime developers (just look at the TCPA efforts and what big corporations could do with it).)
 
Old 11-14-2006, 11:22 AM   #26
dvpqew
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
install gcc-4.1.1 in gentoo ?

So greate.
I am currently install gentoo 2006.1 and trying to install gnome in my machine. But the installation always fails in emerge gcc-4.1.1, and report internal compiler error.
Inspired by this thread, can I first install gcc-4.1.1 in my gentoo kernel and then emerge gnome without encountering that error again? So I mean after I install gcc-4.1.1. in my machine, the emerge gnome will not compile gcc-4.1.1 and stops at gcc failure? Thanks for any advice.

BTW. My cpu is Athlon-xp 1800 (old one), is this processor supported by gcc-4.1.1?


Quote:
Originally Posted by byte weaver
OK, so here goes:
1. Download the full "gcc-4.1.1" source package from gcc.gnu.org (ca. 38 MB).
2. As a normal user (not root), enter the untarred directory (e.g. "gcc-4.1.1")
3. Run the command:
Code:
configure --prefix=/usr
4. Run make:
Code:
make
5. After a couple of hours -- after make is done, become root, enter the directory, and type
Code:
make install
6. Et voila!

I just compiled a bunch of stuff with 4.1.1, and things are looking very good indeed!! My kernel 2.6.16 compiled with 4.1.1 runs about 5-10 times faster than the old version that was compiled with 3.3.5 (subjective impression).

I built the dependencies for KDE 3.5.4 (from linuxpackages.net) and installed everything, and now I'm running KDE 3.5.4! (btw, I have to tell the maintainer of that package that is package list is incomplete).

The reason for me to upgrade to GCC 4.1.1 was that compiling "liboil" caused a GCC 3.3.5 crash with internal compiler error while compiling optimized SSE2 code. With GCC 4.1.1, no problem!!
 
  


Reply

Tags
best, build, collection, compile, compiler, compiz, crash, customizing, dependencies, faster, gcc, gnome, incomplete, kde, kernel, latest, slackware, xfce, xgl


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
building gcc slackware jakiel Linux - Newbie 5 01-30-2007 08:19 PM
Upgrade from gcc 3.X to gcc 4.0 in Slackware Bob_H Linux - Software 2 06-01-2006 09:51 PM
Slackware gcc not working? bulzbb Slackware 3 03-20-2004 01:09 AM
slackware 8.1 and gcc adi Linux - Software 2 02-04-2003 12:27 PM
gcc/slackware xlord Slackware 1 01-18-2003 10:12 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:58 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration