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madcowtricks 10-28-2010 11:30 PM

Where in the source code do I find the source for the Cisco FCoE HBA Drvr?
 
I have an old Dell Inspiron 2600 my son gave me. I've gotten 12.2 to install on it, but when I go to install 13.1, halfway through the booting from the iso disk, it hangs at

Loading iSCSI transport class v2.0-870
fnic: Cisco FCoE HBA Driver, ver 1.0.0.1121

I googled around and didn't find anything pertinent. A reference to how the Open-FCoE code is now in the 13.1 kernel and how it would have been better to be a module. So I read through the Slackware forum posts here and couldn't find anything. Since I'm not going to be using FCoE I figured I could just go into the source code, and rebuild a new kernel without that. Problem is. I can't find the source code for it. I figured the actual string "Cisco" had to be somewhere in the source tree in order for it to display the status line, but a massive, recursive, ignore the case, grep couldn't find it.

Any ideas?
Mark

jovanoti 10-29-2010 03:59 AM

Try this way
Code:

grep -Ri cisco /usr/src/linux/| grep -i FCoE || grep -i HBA
. If you can't find anything you should install kernel source package or get the kernel source from kernel.org.

udaman 10-29-2010 08:38 AM

It may be that there is no source code available for that driver. Cisco may supply a binary file instead. Often proprietary software is released by private companies, as is the case with Nvidia video drivers.

madcowtricks 10-29-2010 03:18 PM

I did think of that. But wouldn't there have to be some sort of plain text directive identifying their binary needed to be included? I know that may very well be something cryptic that's not an obvious thing to grep but most of the source and build files have fairly descriptive identifiers.

fbsduser 10-30-2010 02:06 AM

it could easily be either in the initrd or somewhere in the /etc/rc.d stuff.

udaman 10-30-2010 09:21 AM

I may have misread your original post. Are you asking about the source code for the kernel? I read it that you were looking for the source code for the Cisco driver, sorry.

I'm not on my Slackware distro at the moment, but I think you could grab the source code with this command, if you have a repository defined in /etc/slackpkg/slackpkg.conf:

Code:

slackpkg search kernel
slackpkg install kernel-source

I haven't built a kernel in years, so I can't help you with that part, but it shouldn't be too difficult, as long as you include everything that you DO need.

Cheers.

madcowtricks 01-27-2011 03:00 PM

found
 
To make a long story short. The only pre-compiled kernels in the installation disk are the huge and hugesmp builds. both containing the Cisco drivers. The final solution I went with was to install Slack 13.1 on a handy white-box I built. Then use the k series to build a custom kernel for the Dell Inspiron 2600 that is tailored to the particular hardware in the laptop. Make sure during the make menuconfig stage you go into the SCSI drive support and turnoff the Cisco FNIC driver, and iSCSI and the Fibre Channel driver in the network drive support portions. Then build. Since I want to install on a blank disk on my Dell laptop. I then copy the contents of the Slack 13.1 install disk 1 to my disk. But the custom kernel under kernels on the Disk and build a new iso image. Voila the first disk gives me the option to use my custom kernel to boot and everything is hunky-dory.

Thanks for to the people who took the time to read and respond to my initial question

Mark


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