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alekoos 04-26-2004 01:39 PM

what is the difference between a daemon a client and a server?
 
I am really confused with those words.Let's say i have an ssh client and a server.What is the difference between the ssh client-server-daemon ??
I am giving an example to get the basic idea but i would like to read some documentation on that.
Any information appreciated :)

tank728 04-26-2004 01:51 PM

To my understand a server and a deamon are the same thing. For example if you have an ftp server running, then it is just some deamon (proftpd) running in the background. A client connects to the server/deamon. For example some ftp clients include: ftp, ncftp, gftp, and im sure there are others.

-tank

JimmyJ 04-26-2004 01:55 PM

I think it can go a little deeper than that too. From my understanding, a daemon is typically part of a system startup process. It's something that is configured to run on boot. For instance, you can setup apache to either run as a daemon (it will start when the system starts) or as a stand alone server (you need to start the server manually). A client is ... well, it's whoever is connecting to that computer. That's the way I've seen it in action ...

Shade 04-26-2004 02:00 PM

A daemon runs in the background doing something like monitoring files, connections, sounds, etc.
There are many types, as well -- typical "server" daemons, like proftpd, nfsd, httpd, and even things as nominal as sound servers, like esd and artsd. They simply run in the background, doing their thing for whatever their particular purpose is.
They don't have to be started at boot, though they are usually configured to do so.

Servers usually utilize daemons to run in the background.
There's also inetd, which is the internet superserver daemon -- it will start a server, (another daemon) on demand when a port is accessed by a client.

A client can be any program on any machine that accesses a server or daemon. Xmms is a client to artsd when you're running kde. Your browser is a client to httpd when you connect to a website.
Your machine and the mount program are clients when you connect to an NFS file server.
Your window manager is a client to the X-Server.

Clear things up a bit?

--Shade

alekoos 04-27-2004 02:14 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Shade
A daemon runs in the background doing something like monitoring files, connections, sounds, etc.
There are many types, as well -- typical "server" daemons, like proftpd, nfsd, httpd, and even things as nominal as sound servers, like esd and artsd. They simply run in the background, doing their thing for whatever their particular purpose is.
They don't have to be started at boot, though they are usually configured to do so.

Servers usually utilize daemons to run in the background.
There's also inetd, which is the internet superserver daemon -- it will start a server, (another daemon) on demand when a port is accessed by a client.

A client can be any program on any machine that accesses a server or daemon. Xmms is a client to artsd when you're running kde. Your browser is a client to httpd when you connect to a website.
Your machine and the mount program are clients when you connect to an NFS file server.
Your window manager is a client to the X-Server.

Clear things up a bit?

--Shade

Well the messy thing was to clear the difference between a daemon and a server.A daemon is a process that runs in the backround.
1)It may be a server or not ?
2)It does some work for the server or e.g. the X-daemon and the X-server is it the same thing ?? I mean when a daemon is also a server?

EDIT:
Beside my questions is there any paper that i can read the differences between server and daemon??
I search in google/linux but i find nothing :(


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