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View Poll Results: Most stable: Debian Stable or Current Slackware
Slackware 106 80.92%
Debian 17 12.98%
Other... 8 6.11%
Voters: 131. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-29-2010, 09:52 AM   #16
tommcd
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I have been using Slackware since version 11. I have been using Debian since Sarge. I would say that Slackware and Debian-stable are the 2 most rock solid stable distros in the linux universe.
However, Debian typically goes much longer than Slackware between stable releases. So Slackware stable is always much more up to date than Debian stable in my experience.
Also, since Slackware's package manager does not resolve dependencies, if you want the latest (and hopefully greatest!!!) version of a package then you just install it. There is no need to mess with the complexities of managing a mixed stable + testing +/- sid system as in Debian, if you want newer packages.
Using the slackbuild scripts at slackbuilds.org and sbopkg at sobopkg.org for extra Slackware packages makes installing extra packages on Slackware very easy.
Plus, the Salix repos have binary packages that are fully compatible with Slackware.
So Slackware stable has the best of both worlds: Slackware is both rock solid stable, and it can be as up to date as you want it to be.

Last edited by tommcd; 08-29-2010 at 09:56 AM.
 
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Old 08-29-2010, 01:56 PM   #17
mcnalu
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Well, to answer this question I burned a debian lenny DVD and also a slackware 13.1 (64 bit) DVD.

Both were extremely stable on my first test.

Then I rotated the disks by 90 degrees and tried to balance them on their edges and I have to say that both became incredibly unstable, even my beloved slackware.
 
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Old 08-29-2010, 05:17 PM   #18
spoovy
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CentOS
 
Old 08-29-2010, 05:58 PM   #19
jjthomas
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Solaris?
 
Old 08-29-2010, 10:15 PM   #20
FredGSanford
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnalu View Post
Well, to answer this question I burned a debian lenny DVD and also a slackware 13.1 (64 bit) DVD.

Both were extremely stable on my first test.

Then I rotated the disks by 90 degrees and tried to balance them on their edges and I have to say that both became incredibly unstable, even my beloved slackware.
Very good answer...
 
Old 08-30-2010, 04:42 PM   #21
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnalu View Post
.
Then I rotated the disks by 90 degrees and tried to balance them on their edges and I have to say that both became incredibly unstable, even my beloved slackware.
Well then, it seems that even Slackware can not defy the laws of gravity and physics, at least not yet anyway.
I bet that Pat Volkerding is working on fixing this "bug" even as I write this
 
Old 08-30-2010, 07:42 PM   #22
fancylad
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Maybe Slackware does win but to be fair Slackware's official package base is tiny compared to Debian's. Considering how large the official package base is for Debian I would say that Debian's stability is more impressive than Slackware's.
 
Old 08-30-2010, 08:43 PM   #23
bnguyen
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Both are extremely stable but I vote for Slackware because of its more up-to-date packages and simplicity in managing packages.
 
Old 09-19-2010, 09:17 AM   #24
saopedrodaserra
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I've already use all the distros and who tries slack stops on it.
 
Old 09-19-2010, 09:31 AM   #25
saopedrodaserra
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slack is more stable cause patrick doesn't change anything on programs code = kiss(keep it simple stupid)
 
Old 09-19-2010, 01:24 PM   #26
rob.rice
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I tired installing debian once but the packmanager chocked on "no libc installed"
while installing libc
when I tired to force the package manager to install libc it
just kept reporting no libc installed
 
Old 09-19-2010, 08:32 PM   #27
disturbed1
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Debian has a very stable bare bones server setup. It's once you begin to install most of the GUI apps, a person is bound to run into trouble. For some odd reason Debian tends to believe they can write better code than upstream, and their ideas must be imposed upon the user. Occasionally (not always ) these patches have been known to cause a few stability issues, notably with multimedia packages.

Another issue with these Debianified packages, is that if there is an upstream bug with a trivial upstream patch released to fix the issue - it is not a simple method to build, patch, and package an official Debian package. You're at the whim of one of the 10,000's Debian packagers. Then you need to hope this fix gets back ported, or try your luck running mixed repos and play with apt-pinning, worry about the dependency tracker stating somelib1.2.2-debian3 is different than somelib1.2.2-debian2 even though the source is exactly the same, and the Debian diff only reads +somelib1.2.2-debian3 -somelib1.2.2-debian2, which causes apt to tell you to update 550 packages only to get the bug fix for mousepad's find function

There's another issue with Debian stable. Once Debian Stable is released, a great deal of the software is outdated, and will become antiquated (in software terms) before the next Stable release.

Slackware also has an extremely stable bare bones server setup. Due to Pat and the team's critical evaluation and testing of other packages - only those which they choose make it through to current, then onto stable. Slackware's nature is to patch only if absolutely necessary. This greatly limits the ratio of packager caused bugs, and adds the ability to directly track upstream. Should a released package have an upstream bug, in which upstream does release a patch for, it's extremely simple to add the patch command to the SlackBuild, and build an official proper Slackware package. Slackware also has the pleasure of some what new and current packages, with a release just about twice a year.

So, on the onset, both Slackware and Debian are each extremely stable. It's the maintainer-ship, longevity, and ability to self administer in which Slackware whoops up on Debian
System stability is more than getting a login prompt 2 minutes after installation.
 
Old 09-19-2010, 09:57 PM   #28
dc_eros
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I voted Slackware anyway
 
Old 09-19-2010, 10:08 PM   #29
damgar
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This is like asking which is bluer, the sea or the sky. It depends on what you consider "stable". Debian stable hasn't had a new release in years, that's definitely stable. My Slackware -current box only gets rebooted when I upgrade my kernel or need to unplug the machine for the most part. That's also stable, but definitely not the same. I'd like to vote for Slackware because it's my personal favorite, but it would be like telling the prettiest girl in high school how pretty she is......it's already been said.
 
Old 09-20-2010, 11:07 AM   #30
Squall90
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Last times I installed Debian stable it broke within hours since it has only ancient software that probably don't work properly (e.g. Pidgin/GAIM with ICQ).
Slackware just runs and it's software isn't that old so you can do your day-to-day work.

So I vote for Slackware.
 
  


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