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Old 02-24-2013, 05:43 AM   #1
average_user
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What boot time can I expect with SSD?


I am building a new computer and I am going to get a SSD disk for system installation. I was thinking about Samsung SSD 840 Pro 128 GB, reportedly one of the fastest SSD disks out there. What increase in boot time can I expect on Slackware with current BSD-style startup scripts? I count on your personal experience.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 07:16 AM   #2
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"What increase in boot time can I expect?" I guess you really mean 'decrease'. I wouldn't expect much of a difference from using a regular SATA disk. I imagine that under 5 seconds difference, if that.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:00 AM   #3
TobiSGD
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I use a Corsair Force 3 120GB on my main system, from Lilo to login prompt (runlevel 3) with the standard generic kernel, NFS network mounts and starting some daemons the system needs 17 seconds.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:16 AM   #4
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I heard that SSD disks can give you a huge boost in performance. 17 seconds is still quite slow. Do you think it has something to do with Slackware specific boot procedure?
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:17 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnashley View Post
"What increase in boot time can I expect?" I guess you really mean 'decrease'. I wouldn't expect much of a difference from using a regular SATA disk. I imagine that under 5 seconds difference, if that.
From memory, that is about the speedup I got when moving my workstation to SSD. Currently it takes about 12 s from boot loader to logon. I remember seeing a slightly more noticable difference on a laptop.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:21 AM   #6
gnashley
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"Do you think it has something to do with Slackware specific boot procedure?" Yes, I do. Slackware init process does some things that other distros don't do during bootup. And the general procedure is not optimized for sanity, not speed.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:34 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
I heard that SSD disks can give you a huge boost in performance. 17 seconds is still quite slow. Do you think it has something to do with Slackware specific boot procedure?
With Debian on the slower SSD (Intel X40-V) in my laptop I was able to boot from Grub prompt to an (autologged in) Openbox WM in less than ten seconds. I never bothered with speeding up the boot time, since I rarely boot, but AFAIK Slackware's init system leaves much room to optimize, so that you can get far better boot times than I do.
I just don't care about boot times, so I never tried it.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:45 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnashley View Post
Slackware init process does some things that other distros don't do during bootup. And the general procedure is not optimized for sanity, not speed.
Yes, I know that and I am aware of that. Apart from boot time, I hope SSD disk will enhance my productivity in other areas such as searching for files, copying files, indexing a few thousands of e-mails and starting big programs. Can someone confirm the difference?


Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
I just don't care about boot times, so I never tried it.
I am quite impatient and don't want to wait for my computer - it should wait for me. I consider installing coreboot on my motherboard to save some time on initial POST phase without resigning from current Slackware startup style.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 09:47 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
Yes, I know that and I am aware of that. Apart from boot time, I hope SSD disk will enhance my productivity in other areas such as searching for files, copying files, indexing a few thousands of e-mails and starting big programs. Can someone confirm the difference?
I can confirm that working on a SSD is faster than on a mechanical disk, especially with tasks involving access to many files due to significantly shorter seek times.

Quote:
I am quite impatient and don't want to wait for my computer - it should wait for me. I consider installing coreboot on my motherboard to save some time on initial POST phase without resigning from current Slackware startup style.
Then the first thing I would do is to simply not boot. Use standby and you will have almost instant startup.
 
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Old 02-24-2013, 12:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
Apart from boot time, I hope SSD disk will enhance my productivity in other areas such as searching for files, copying files, indexing a few thousands of e-mails and starting big programs. Can someone confirm the difference?
The speed improvement for certain operations when I moved from a standard SATA drive to a Intel SSD on my laptop was staggering. For example, extracting the Linux kernel source went from several minutes to under ten seconds. Likewise, deleting the extracted kernel source directory showed similar decreases in time. Obviously there are other factors that come in to play with these tasks, such as processing power, filesystem, etc. Starting times for certain programs, such as LibreOffice and Eclipse, have also improved, but I don't think the difference is all that huge.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 01:00 PM   #11
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10-15 sec in my case
 
Old 02-24-2013, 05:50 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
Yes, I know that and I am aware of that. Apart from boot time, I hope SSD disk will enhance my productivity in other areas such as searching for files, copying files, indexing a few thousands of e-mails and starting big programs. Can someone confirm the difference?
Typically, an SSD will improve on those things in a first-access scenario. Due to the block buffer of the OS, the second access will be served from RAM anyway (assuming you have enough RAM).

Performancewise I was a bit underwhelmed with the improvement after moving my systems to SSDs. However, since you get used to every little bit, I don't want to move back either.

PS: one very good reason for an SSD in a laptop ist the high shock resistance.
 
Old 02-24-2013, 06:14 PM   #13
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I wouldn't buy an SSD to expect much gain in boot times. The current systems seem to take longer than the old IBM AT systems. You can expect some things to be faster when booted and that should be the reason you buy a good one. I don't think my boot time all together is improved much with an ssd on a new i7 system. Still have to wait for the system to access the disk.
 
  


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