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Old 05-02-2014, 07:07 PM   #106
jtsn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
What steps did you take when installing Slackware, to enable and configure your network? You can use NetworkManager, but then you have to make its startup script executable (by default is it not)
When you run netconfig (either during setup or manually) and choose the option NetworkManager, then it makes rc.networkmanager executable for you. Should be quite foolproof.
 
Old 05-03-2014, 10:20 PM   #107
Sumguy
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Whoa-ho-o-o-o!!!! I think I'm getting the hang of this, guys! I successfully switched to a generic kernel, just minutes ago- and it boots up with no problem! Onward and upward!



Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
When you run netconfig (either during setup or manually) and choose the option NetworkManager, then it makes rc.networkmanager executable for you. Should be quite foolproof.
My wired DSL connection is working fine now.....

In the future, I want to also set up Slack to be able to switch to the built-in 56K modem (for when the electricity goes out- that way I can still get online, when the DSL modem will not be working)....

If anyone wants to point me in the right direction on that one....only if you care to, 'cause I'm sure I can find the info by googling.....
 
Old 05-04-2014, 02:22 AM   #108
Didier Spaier
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Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
In the future, I want to also set up Slack to be able to switch to the built-in 56K modem
The main problem will probably be to get the proper driver, especially if it's a win or soft modem.

If actually you suffer of electricity shortages in the rural Kentucky, you could get yourself an USB modem instead (of course, fisrt make sure it has Linux support).

However:
  • Without knowing precisely the exact model of your internal modem we won't be able to help you.
  • Using such a modem could quickly drain your battery.
  • Don't expect to watch TV with that
  • You could consider opening a new thread for this new topic, maybe in the Linux Hardware sub-forum.

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 05-04-2014 at 02:25 AM.
 
Old 05-04-2014, 10:24 AM   #109
Sumguy
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Ah! Great points, Didier.

No...I wouldn't be watching TV on the laptop (I never watch TV...period! )

I just thought that since it has the built-in modem, maybe I could put it to use. The electricity only goes out maybe once or twice a year- usually when we have bad storms. It'd be nice to be able to keep an eye on the weather radar...and maybe check business and be able to email, if it's out for a long time (Once it was out for 24 hours- but that was just once in 13 years...).

I'll check and see what kind of modem it is...then Google to see if drivers are available. I never thought of a USB DSL modem! Sure...it gets it's power from the USB....

And I guess it is time, ifwhen I have other issues/questions...to start seperate threads, eh? (So far, so good. I'm getting such confidence, I may try installing Slack on the desktop computer again!)
 
Old 05-04-2014, 02:39 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
In the future, I want to also set up Slack to be able to switch to the built-in 56K modem (for when the electricity goes out- that way I can still get online, when the DSL modem will not be working)....
I would recommend using an Android smartphone for this purpose. Either configure it as a portable Wi-Fi hotspot or connect it by USB to get your notebook "tethered". Slackware supports both methods.
 
Old 05-04-2014, 04:01 PM   #111
Sumguy
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Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
I would recommend using an Android smartphone for this purpose. Either configure it as a portable Wi-Fi hotspot or connect it by USB to get your notebook "tethered". Slackware supports both methods.
Negatory! Not gonna be doing that! (I keep a Tracfone in my glove compartment, just-in-case....and that's the extent of my involvement with cell phones. I hate the darn things!)

Thanks for the suggestion though. For most people these days, that would probably be the logical choice.

The USB modem is probably the best bet for me...if I can find one that both works with Linux, AND is compatible with my phone company's DSL.....or maybe just see what voltage my regular modem takes...and find/make a battery-powered power supply for it......
 
Old 05-04-2014, 04:46 PM   #112
Didier Spaier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
AND is compatible with my phone company's DSL
Not relevant for an USB modem. I have in mind a device like this one. No ADSL, it's a dial up modem/fax. This one can be used on Linux.

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 05-04-2014 at 04:52 PM.
 
Old 05-04-2014, 09:29 PM   #113
jtsn
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Quote:
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Thanks for the suggestion though. For most people these days, that would probably be the logical choice.
For most people it's the only fallback choice. Landlines supporting POTS modems become scarce nowadays.
 
Old 05-04-2014, 11:17 PM   #114
Sumguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Didier Spaier View Post
Not relevant for an USB modem. I have in mind a device like this one. No ADSL, it's a dial up modem/fax. This one can be used on Linux.
That is awesome! I never knew such a thing existed. $23 on Amazon! Just to keep in for the rare occasion I may need it, how could ya beat it?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
For most people it's the only fallback choice. Landlines supporting POTS modems become scarce nowadays.
Better make sure the phone company still supports dial-up, eh? It seems like a great thing to have for a back-up, considering the reliability of landlines- but then I guess they'd figure it's not worth it for the occasional person who'd use it just on a rare occasion.
 
Old 05-05-2014, 12:14 AM   #115
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Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
Better make sure the phone company still supports dial-up, eh? It seems like a great thing to have for a back-up, considering the reliability of landlines- but then I guess they'd figure it's not worth it for the occasional person who'd use it just on a rare occasion.
Some Telcos/ISPs already removed the POTS equipment from their landlines and transitioned to VoIPoADSL. This is also called All Digital mode (splitter-less) ADSL (Annex I/J), because there is no "dialing up" involved anymore.
 
Old 05-09-2014, 01:28 PM   #116
Sumguy
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Hey guys, how come in Slackware, I have to switch to root in order to poweroff? (sudo, which I enabled for my regular user account, doesn't even work for that). Am I doing something wrong? (I click "exit" from the Fluxbox menu; that dumps me out to the console; then I have to su to root, to finally poweroff...otherwise, i just get the "command not found".....)

Also: Today I had to copy a DVD (public domain) and since I just realized that Crunchbang doesn't have a DVD-burning utility, I turned-on my laptop, and did it in Slack, with k3b. (Slackware to the rescue!). I knew K3b was in there, because I know Slack comes with KDE. The K utiolities aren't listed in the Fluxbox menus..... My question is: How do I know what programs I have in Slackware? (i.e., I mean, say I want to convert some mp3s or make a graphic? How do I know what programs already included in the Slackware installation will do what I want?

I am very satisfied with both the performance of Slackware and of my used laptop! That combination actually works better (and much quieter!) than my 3GHZ desktop, which is of the same vintage. I really have to try Crunchbang on the other partition of the laptop, just to see how it works there, too....as methinks my desktop (purchased new in '07) is a POS- and has been since day one. It's been noisy, regardless of what OS I've used (except it was extremely noisy with the Vista, with which it came)...and it's always lagged and had hesitations and blackouts.
 
Old 05-09-2014, 01:39 PM   #117
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
Hey guys, how come in Slackware, I have to switch to root in order to poweroff? (sudo, which I enabled for my regular user account, doesn't even work for that). Am I doing something wrong? (I click "exit" from the Fluxbox menu; that dumps me out to the console; then I have to su to root, to finally poweroff...otherwise, i just get the "command not found".....)

Also: Today I had to copy a DVD (public domain) and since I just realized that Crunchbang doesn't have a DVD-burning utility, I turned-on my laptop, and did it in Slack, with k3b. (Slackware to the rescue!). I knew K3b was in there, because I know Slack comes with KDE. The K utiolities aren't listed in the Fluxbox menus..... My question is: How do I know what programs I have in Slackware? (i.e., I mean, say I want to convert some mp3s or make a graphic? How do I know what programs already included in the Slackware installation will do what I want?
If you want to know which applications are installed, you can browse KDE's menus (or Xfce's). Still you have to find out which package does what by either trial and error methods or you'd have to know what you're looking for. Mind you CLI applications are not listed in menus by default.

Sometimes it's useful to use the 'apropos' command to give you an idea:

Code:
$ apropos mp3
mpg321 []            (1)  - Free clone of mpg123, a command - line mp3 player
normalize []         (1)  - mp3 - adjust levels of mp3 or ogg files by running normalize(1), then re - encoding
If you want to check if a package is installed you can issue:

Code:
ls /var/log/packages | grep name_of_the_package

For the power down question, see:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ckware-699263/

Last edited by sycamorex; 05-09-2014 at 01:40 PM.
 
Old 05-09-2014, 02:07 PM   #118
Sumguy
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Thanks, Sycamore! The "apropos" command is a new one for me! That'll be very useful. I'm not just picking on Slackware either...what I said pretty much pertains to all distros. I don't think I've yet seen one which comes with a list and description of packages. Browsing the menus of the various included DEs/WMs of my distros is pretty much the first thing i do when I install a distro (Heck, that's how I learned to use a computer! )...you would think there'd be something a little more formal. It's these little issues, I think, that makes it hard for newbs coming from Windows. The actual use of Linux is a breeze. Trying to figure out what exactly you have...and what does what- that can be tricky sometimes, for a new user. (Bear in mind, if they did somewthing to address that issue, I'd probably then say that it was "too dumbed-down" !@ )
 
Old 05-09-2014, 02:10 PM   #119
Sumguy
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Oh, and I bookmarked a bunch of great links last night- like Slackbook; etc. I'll be doing a little reading....
 
Old 05-09-2014, 02:11 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
Thanks, Sycamore! The "apropos" command is a new one for me! That'll be very useful. I'm not just picking on Slackware either...what I said pretty much pertains to all distros. I don't think I've yet seen one which comes with a list and description of packages. Browsing the menus of the various included DEs/WMs of my distros is pretty much the first thing i do when I install a distro (Heck, that's how I learned to use a computer! )...you would think there'd be something a little more formal. It's these little issues, I think, that makes it hard for newbs coming from Windows. The actual use of Linux is a breeze. Trying to figure out what exactly you have...and what does what- that can be tricky sometimes, for a new user. (Bear in mind, if they did somewthing to address that issue, I'd probably then say that it was "too dumbed-down" !@ )
Very soon, you'll know which program to use to do what. If you want to do something specific, just google for it, eg. how to edit a video in linux. It's the same with Windows or any other OS. Windows does not come with it either.
 
  


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