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Old 02-14-2005, 01:58 PM   #1
roAder
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Lightbulb very simple user question


I read all the time of ppl who uses user on their Linux systems, Im just wondering why bother?
I always just install Linux and login as Root.
No users needed for me..
Is there something wrong with that except for when its required to have a second user to install some programs?
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:11 PM   #2
keefaz
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Well, time will tell

I mean when you will get some experiences with Linux system, you will find by yourself the reason why most of the Linux/Unix users use the root user for administrative operations only.
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:13 PM   #3
Joubert79
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Indeed, time will tell.

Any application you run as root has root privileges, and consequently may romp freely all over your system. You should be certain you never run apps or scripts you don't trust well.

Doing everyday tasks as a normal user also prevents blunders like "rm -Rf *" in the root directory. NB Do NOT do this as root (or even as a user really).

One compromise people make between working as root and user is to use sudo to give root powers to users, but only for certain purposes. You might find it useful.

Last edited by Joubert79; 02-14-2005 at 02:15 PM.
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:16 PM   #4
mikieboy
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There are two very good reasons why you should NEVER run routinely as root.
Firstly, you can do something you didn't intend to and trash your system.
Second, if you get hacked, and if your security is less than watertight you could be, then the hacker has full file permissions on your system ie. he can do whatever he likes.
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:18 PM   #5
roAder
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ok, Im convinced.
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:19 PM   #6
IsaacKuo
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Here's one more reason, and perhaps the most important:

Because it's standard practice to log in as root only when necessary, practically all Linux documentation in books and on the Internet presumes this practice. It's easier to use help files and documentation when you're doing things in a similar way to what is presumed.
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:28 PM   #7
reddazz
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Some systems actually prevent direct logins as root using login managers or ssh because of the security implications. If your computer is connected to the web in some way, I would suggest creating a normal user account.
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:29 PM   #8
roAder
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Well is it possible to reconfigure the su so that it has limited user access or is su not even classed as a user?
verything is virtualy possible in C++
 
Old 02-14-2005, 02:58 PM   #9
keefaz
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su is a command, not an user, to give to an user some commands which require root privileges,
look at sudo command and its /etc/sudoers config file

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=289808
 
  


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