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Old 11-27-2003, 08:32 PM   #1
cozye
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Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Louisville, KY
Distribution: Slackware
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user permissions, superuser possible ?


I seem to run into permissions problems a lot, since I try to do everything from a normal user account. I know that I can modify permissions on devices etc. individually, but I was wondering what others do to overcome things like mplayer not having access to /dev/cdrom, gnome sound device access, mounting network shares, etc... from a normal user account. Some things such as mplayer will not run from an su terminal window. I could just always login as root, but I would rather not, unless i fix X to allow screensavers to run etc...

What does everyone else do about this ? Just add my user account to the root, and adm groups? chown everything that gets in the way ? Is there a correct way to have a "superuser" ?
 
Old 11-27-2003, 08:43 PM   #2
Azmeen
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Registered: May 2003
Location: Malaysia
Distribution: Slackware, LFS, CentOS
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Things like cdrom, I usually just edit my fstab to allow normal users to access it. Never had problems with mplayer accessing it at all.
 
Old 11-27-2003, 08:46 PM   #3
Tinkster
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The clean way would be to
chgrp <group> /dev/<specific device>

to a group, like
chgrp audio /dev/dsp* /dev/mix* /dev/mid*
chgrp cdrom /dev/hdc
...
and
chmod g+w /dev/<for the lot of above>

and then make yourself (or other users) member
of those respectively ... as for the output of X
programs (like mplayer) to the users desktop:

You could always
ssh -X root@localhost mplayer

Or, quicker, but not necessarily safe:
as user:
xhost +localhost
as root:
export DISPLAY=localhost:0.0


Cheers,
Tink

P.S.: Hey Azmeen, thanks for the affero! :}

Last edited by Tinkster; 11-27-2003 at 08:47 PM.
 
Old 11-27-2003, 08:57 PM   #4
Azmeen
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Registered: May 2003
Location: Malaysia
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Listen to Tinkster, his method is "the proper way" (TM). My simple hack was for what's essentially a single-user system I'm the only person using it... it's faster, but not recommended for a multi-user environment.

Quote:
Originally posted by Tinkster
P.S.: Hey Azmeen, thanks for the affero! :}
No prob man... you deserve it
 
Old 03-11-2005, 11:56 AM   #5
dufferin
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Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Mt Dufferin
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 72

Rep: Reputation: 15
Unhappy pulled out the root

Just UpGraded to Slack 10.1, VERY nice . . . Thank-You PV!

This time I decided to use a separate account, I'm told it's safer.
But, every time I try to do something as a user I don't have permission.

So, I logout/login as root, make the permission changes, then
logout/login as user and go on to do something else and find that
I don't have premission to do that either, so I do the above allover again.
Then on top of that, some changes I make with Kuser don't stick.
gggggrrrrrrr!

I know the drives I want access to are mounted rw.
As root, I have total power.

How can I allow a user to have access to everything root does
without allowing the user ability to damage the system?

What does everyone else do about this?
Should I stick to being root?
I'm the only one in the house really using Linux.

Many tanks
 
Old 03-11-2005, 12:19 PM   #6
perfect_circle
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Athens, Greece
Distribution: Slackware, arch
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how did you make the account?
Use useradd instead of adduser.
I did not have many permission problems. I just added my user to some groups, altered fstab a little bit, and changed the permissions in 2-3 device files, and everything worked fine.

Last edited by perfect_circle; 03-11-2005 at 12:41 PM.
 
Old 03-11-2005, 12:40 PM   #7
keefaz
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Registered: Mar 2004
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Linux as an Unix system is designed to be multiuser system, you have to set permissions to use it.
 
Old 03-11-2005, 10:19 PM   #8
dufferin
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Location: Mt Dufferin
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 72

Rep: Reputation: 15
How did you alter fstab?

Thanks
 
  


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