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-   -   Updating packages-slack-9.0 question (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/updating-packages-slack-9-0-question-66276/)

BearClaw 06-17-2003 10:08 PM

Updating packages-slack-9.0 question
 
I installed slack-9.0 last night and I have a cd with all the slack-9 updates on it.

I did not do a "full" install(a few programs not needed).

What I was wanting to know is...what do I need to do to update the packages that I have installed?

All suggestions/input is appreciated very much(grin).

Please, be specific if you don't mind :) .

TIA, BC ;)

jvannucci 06-17-2003 10:17 PM

I don't have my slack system booted right now, so no details, but start with:

# man pkgtool
# man installpkg
# man updatepkg

I think the last one is called updatepkg...

J.W. 06-18-2003 02:18 AM

I have 3 suggestions that I hope may turn out to be worthwhile. First, to find the latest versions of just about any package for Slack, go to: www.linuxpackages.net That site is a gold mine for Slackers. Second, assuming you are using KDE, I have found the KPackage tool to be a really clean method for installing and/or upgrading any new packages. Once you've downloaded the .tgz files, about all you need to do is to launch KPackage, navigate to the directory you've put the file into, click on the install button, enter the root PW when it prompts you, and then it takes care of the rest. Personally, as a Linux newcomer, I think KPackage is a pretty useful tool. Third, consider installing Dropline. Dropline automates the downloading and installation of many common packages. It totally rocks, and it can eliminate a lot of the typical dependency conflicts that you can easily run into (as in, you install one package only to find out that you first need to install another, etc) Note that Dropline does not itself analyze the dependencies, but rather that it will install a suite of the latest versions of many (>160) common useful packages which in my experience has precluded a lot of those sorts of conflicts. Seriously, Dropline is great. To get it, go to: www.dropline.net/gnome/download.php and follow the instructions on that page. That will launch Dropline, and then all you need to do is make your menu selections. (Reboot after it finishes to play it safe) Finally, be aware that Dropline is built for Gnome and will default your window manager to Gnome. If you prefer another manager, you can change it back to your preference by running xwmconfig (in the /usr/X11R6/bin directory) Good luck with it. -- J.W.

Azmeen 06-18-2003 02:24 AM

To get the latest updated packages, I'd recommend using Swaret to stay current :)

DaOne 06-18-2003 06:44 AM

Quote:

To get the latest updated packages, I'd recommend using Swaret to stay current
Yes...Swaret has never failed me.

Also, just FYI...there should be a new release later this month which will add the dependancy fork into swaret-main. Although I don't usually care about checking for dependancies, I have to admit that it is sometimes handy.

BearClaw 06-18-2003 09:09 AM

I'll check out swaret and the other suggestions, but...I already have all the updates on a cd I ordered from discount-linux-cd's.

So, I need info on how to use commands or tools to update the packages that I have installed on my box.

btw: I do use KDE; I didn't even install gnome.

Thanks, again, BC

DaOne 06-18-2003 02:32 PM

Quote:

So, I need info on how to use commands or tools to update the packages that I have installed on my box
Swaret checks the package list from the ftp site (and you can specify which sites you like to use) and compares the available packages to what you have installed. Then you can tell it to upgrade whatever packages you want. It will download and upgrade the package for you. It is a very easy to use, and worthwhile tool.

http://swaret.xbone.be/

BearClaw 06-20-2003 06:19 PM

Update Complete!
 
Guy's, My slack-9 system is fully updated(grin)!

I just mounted the cd; #cd /mnt/cdrom/packages; then:
#upgradepkg --verbose <packagename> , for the needed packages.

I'm running the 2.4.21 kernel now. The CD only cost 99 cents! To me this was the only way to go, since downloading these updates would have took "forever" with a dialup connection.

The entire process was around 25 minutes.:)

Just wanted to post the results in case it might be an option for someone else.

Peace, BC


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