LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-04-2007, 08:53 PM   #1
geomatt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: PA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 315

Rep: Reputation: 30
tuning wireless configuration Slackware 12.0


Just wondering what advice the Slackware gurus out there can give me on wireless configuration. I switch often between different wireless networks -- some with WEP encryption, some without, and am looking for some help making switching easier. A this point I find myself having to constantly re-edit /etc/rc.d/rc.wireless.conf in order to get an internet connection. I typically re-edit rc.wireless.conf with WEP key #1 or #2 or no key, then restart /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1, then openup wifi-ranger and connect from there. If I leave out one of those steps I can't seem to get a connection, unless I happen to be booting up in the place with the WEP key already listed in wireless.conf. There's got to be a better way to do this kind of thing, right?

Thanks,
-geomatt
 
Old 09-04-2007, 09:25 PM   #2
witz
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: 15
You could take a look at Wireless Assistant : http://www.kde-apps.org/content/show...095d4011ef985f

Or WiFi Radar : http://wifi-radar.systemimager.org/
 
Old 09-04-2007, 10:28 PM   #3
perry
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: USA & Canada
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 978

Rep: Reputation: 30
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by geomatt View Post
Just wondering what advice the Slackware gurus out there can give me on wireless configuration. I switch often between different wireless networks -- some with WEP encryption, some without, and am looking for some help making switching easier. A this point I find myself having to constantly re-edit /etc/rc.d/rc.wireless.conf in order to get an internet connection. I typically re-edit rc.wireless.conf with WEP key #1 or #2 or no key, then restart /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1, then openup wifi-ranger and connect from there. If I leave out one of those steps I can't seem to get a connection, unless I happen to be booting up in the place with the WEP key already listed in wireless.conf. There's got to be a better way to do this kind of thing, right?

Thanks,
-geomatt
I got a rather simple 20 line script that does the whole sha-bang for me, take a look at my signature, go to that page and look up wireless and then let me know how you made out.

- Perry

Last edited by perry; 09-04-2007 at 10:36 PM.
 
Old 09-04-2007, 10:30 PM   #4
geomatt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: PA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 315

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
You could take a look at Wireless Assistant : http://www.kde-apps.org/content/show...095d4011ef985f

Or WiFi Radar : http://wifi-radar.systemimager.org/
Thanks for the suggestions. I am already using wifi-radar (sorry, that was a typo in the original post where I said "wifi-ranger"). What I am after is a way of using it more effectively in combination with the native Slackware configuration scripts. It can be run in daemon mode right? How can that be setup to play nicely with the Slackware scripts? Or is it possible to use wifi-radar instead of rc.inet1?

-geomatt
 
Old 09-04-2007, 10:38 PM   #5
perry
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: USA & Canada
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 978

Rep: Reputation: 30
Well...

In light of how much trouble (i thought) it take for me to setup wireless on my system, not having to fool around with rc.wireless or rc.wireless.conf is like a breath of fresh air. I'm using ndiswrapper, and ndiswrapper is handling all the details for me. If your wireless comes with an .inf file, seriously look into what I'm suggesting. I'm not sure what your looking for other than that.

I got it easy,
Code:
1. download, make & install ndiswrapper
2. install the .inf file
3. modprobe ndiswrapper
4. run the script to start or stop
5. attach the script to the startup sequence (rc.M/rc.6)
Doesn't get any simpler... if it does, let me know!

Cheers

- Perry

ps.
as far as wep is concerned, /sbin/iwconfig can help you with that. perhaps you can elaborate on a version of rc.wlan0 that would take two parameters with the 2nd specifying the type of encryption to use..!

Last edited by perry; 09-04-2007 at 10:44 PM.
 
Old 09-04-2007, 11:28 PM   #6
geomatt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: PA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 315

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Perry,
Thanks! Didn't see your post -- I must've been responding to was responding to witz while you were writing. I'll look through your info on setting up wireless config stuff tomorrow when I am more awake than now... My NIC is an Intel 3945 mini pci card and I have a driver that seems to work fine. Isn't ndiswrapper a tool for using windows drivers under linux?

Cheers and good night!
-geo
 
Old 09-05-2007, 02:28 AM   #7
Alien Bob
Slackware Contributor
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 5,258

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by perry View Post
In light of how much trouble (i thought) it take for me to setup wireless on my system, not having to fool around with rc.wireless or rc.wireless.conf is like a breath of fresh air. I'm using ndiswrapper, and ndiswrapper is handling all the details for me. If your wireless comes with an .inf file, seriously look into what I'm suggesting. I'm not sure what your looking for other than that.

I got it easy,
Code:
1. download, make & install ndiswrapper
2. install the .inf file
3. modprobe ndiswrapper
4. run the script to start or stop
5. attach the script to the startup sequence (rc.M/rc.6)
Doesn't get any simpler... if it does, let me know!

Cheers

- Perry

ps.
as far as wep is concerned, /sbin/iwconfig can help you with that. perhaps you can elaborate on a version of rc.wlan0 that would take two parameters with the 2nd specifying the type of encryption to use..!
You don't want to edit the network configuration files (rc.inet1.conf or rc.wireless.conf) yet you advise people to edit the Slackware init scripts themselves (rc.M and rc.6)?
That way, every time you upgrade parts of Slackware you run the risk that your modified rc.M and rc.6 are overwritten and you loose your wireless access. Plus you indicate that your home-made script only allows for unencrypted networks, WEP and WPA envryption are not supported by your script.

And yet it is so simple to add wireless configuration to rc.inet1.conf ... without having to write additional scripts, or hack the Slackware init scripts.

An example:
Suppose you have a wireless card. Either it gets detected by UDEV and a driver for it is loaded automatically, or (in the case of ndiswrapper) you need to load the driver yourself.
If you need to load the wireless driver, you add a single line to the end of the file /etc/rc.d/rc.modules like this (example is for ndiswrapper):
Code:
/sbin/modprobe ndiswrapper
This guarantees that your card is properly working by the time the wireless/network configuration script kicks in.
Now for that configuration; suppose the wireless card is known as wlan0, it uses DHCP, the Access Point has an ESSID name of "any" which means any Access Point will do, the encryption is off, then an entry in rc.inet1.conf will look like:
Code:
IFNAME[4]="wlan0"
IPADDR[4]=""
NETMASK[4]=""
USE_DHCP[4]="yes"
DHCP_HOSTNAME[4]=""
WLAN_ESSID[4]="any"
WLAN_MODE[4]=Managed
I picked 'slot' number 4 but any unused one is OK for you to use usually, only 'slot' 0 is being used for eth0)
Now, add WEP encryption with a passphrase of "mysecret" for an access point called "wolfram" and the above will look like:
Code:
IFNAME[4]="wlan0"
IPADDR[4]=""
NETMASK[4]=""
USE_DHCP[4]="yes"
DHCP_HOSTNAME[4]=""
WLAN_ESSID[4]="wolfram"
WLAN_MODE[4]=Managed
WLAN_KEY[4]="s:mysecret"
And if instead this Access Point uses WPA encryption, the section will look like:
Code:
IFNAME[4]="wlan0"
IPADDR[4]=""
NETMASK[4]=""
USE_DHCP[4]="yes"
DHCP_HOSTNAME[4]=""
WLAN_ESSID[4]="wolfram"
WLAN_MODE[4]=Managed
WLAN_WPA[4]="wpa_supplicant"
and you have to add your ESSID and Pre-Shared Key (the WPA key) to the file /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf

If you configured WPA on your Access Point using a passphrase, then it is simple to calculate the WPA PSK using wpa_passphrase: this command will generate a few lines of output which you can directly paste into /etc/wpa_Supplicant.conf. Example:
Code:
# wpa_passphrase
usage: wpa_passphrase <ssid> [passphrase]

# wpa_passphrase wolfram mysecret
network={
        ssid="wolfram"
        #psk="mysecret"
        psk=9556e5aca35bb51207832a39ca23330952b739ade4a2bd551b97c1ff10eb3d91
}
Some more information about configuring your wireless network in my Wiki.

Eric
 
Old 09-05-2007, 06:35 AM   #8
geomatt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: PA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 315

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Eric,
Thanks for the suggestions as well. How would you handle the multiple access points issue (some encrypted, some not) with a minimum amount of reconfiguring things?

-geo
 
Old 09-05-2007, 07:17 AM   #9
merer
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Vilnius,Lithuania
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 20

Rep: Reputation: 1
Alien Bob already gave you your answer:
Use wpa_supplicant to configure network settings (both encrypted and unencrypted) and use the third version of rc.inet1.conf (the one with wpa encryption - with the line WLAN_WPA[4]="wpa_supplicant" ).
 
Old 09-05-2007, 07:46 AM   #10
geomatt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: PA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 315

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
OK. I'm new to wpa_supplicant. Guess I should do my homework on it.
-geo
 
Old 09-05-2007, 11:01 AM   #11
perry
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: USA & Canada
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 978

Rep: Reputation: 30
Thumbs up Your being a little unfair...!

We are talking about wireless communications here not Internet, not Network.

When I went out and asked the Internet how to setup wireless communications on my system all I got was volumns and volumns of information and one fireworks show after another on how to setup wireless!

Sitting back and shooting at me because (as an option) you would make an addition to rc.M & rc.6 is only manditory and a major part of using the Linux kernel the way it was meant to be used. To simple additions as outlined are all thats required and then you never have to look back.

Further as far as using Windows drivers are concerned, I have been told that under ndiswrapper they are far more reliable that native wireless support provided for Linux to date. Further, the developers of those drivers could only wish that they had something as reliable as Linux to write their drivers for. Writing software for hardware is an exact discipline that requires skill. So using Windows drivers by way of ndiswrapper is simply a matter of rescuing the efforts of a lot of skill, hardworking engineers (with or without the ring).

My advice is simpler and by way of iwconfig, wep encryption can be configured to the users descretion. Given the flaky nature of wireless encryption there is not much point in providing much of a standard way to do that do the issues involved.

For a new user to Linux, my way is simpler and therefore superior!

Cheers

- Perry
 
Old 09-05-2007, 12:27 PM   #12
Alien Bob
Slackware Contributor
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 5,258

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Well you asked for it... I am going to answer you here, and further discussion should take place on Freenode's ##slackware IRC channel as far as I am concerned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by perry View Post
We are talking about wireless communications here not Internet, not Network.

When I went out and asked the Internet how to setup wireless communications on my system all I got was volumns and volumns of information and one fireworks show after another on how to setup wireless!
Well then instead of asking The Internet you could have asked here, and I would have given the same advice as I just did in this thread...

I think you need to realize that 'wireless' equals 'networking' and on a Linux box, Internetworking and LAN networking is essentially the same thing. This is also the reason that you can use rc.inet1.conf as the single source of all your network configuration... wireless and non-wireless; encrypted as well as non-encrypted.

Quote:
Sitting back and shooting at me because (as an option) you would make an addition to rc.M & rc.6 is only manditory and a major part of using the Linux kernel the way it was meant to be used. To simple additions as outlined are all thats required and then you never have to look back.
On the contrary - you propose a hack to Slackware system files which run the risk of being overwritten by the next package upgrade, whereas I show how to use the Slackware way of configuring your wireless card - and by doing it like this you do not have to write a single line of shell script to support it. Now that is a one-time edit and then never look back!
And um, pardon me... "using the Linux kernel the way it was meant to be used", what does that have to do with it?

Quote:
Further as far as using Windows drivers are concerned, I have been told that under ndiswrapper they are far more reliable that native wireless support provided for Linux to date. Further, the developers of those drivers could only wish that they had something as reliable as Linux to write their drivers for.

Writing software for hardware is an exact discipline that requires skill. So using Windows drivers by way of ndiswrapper is simply a matter of rescuing the efforts of a lot of skill, hardworking engineers (with or without the ring).
Whoever told you that wireless networking under ndiswrapper is far more reliable and stable than the native drivers may now bow his head in shame. The ndiswrapper is a hack so that a Linux box can use a wireless card even if the manufacturer refuses to release the hardware specs, and is arrogant enough that only Windows drivers are offered. Ndiswrapper is well-known for kernel stacksize problems where the kernel crashes in the wireless driver because the Linux kernel was never meant to co-operate with Windows code - the Windows driver needs a much larger stacksize for some cards (some run in 32K) than the 8K of the Slackware kernel and under high network load you will experience crashes.
A native Linux driver is almost always the preferable. Almost: because some native drivers need time to mature and get equipped with enough features to make them useable.
I respect the authors of open source wireless drivers much more than any company refusing to support anything but the MS Windows platform.

Quote:
My advice is simpler and by way of iwconfig, wep encryption can be configured to the users descretion. Given the flaky nature of wireless encryption there is not much point in providing much of a standard way to do that do the issues involved.

For a new user to Linux, my way is simpler and therefore superior!
You're a new user to Slackware Linux and try to find your own solutions to the problems you encounter. I think that is good. You will learn a lot.
But your solutions are not always the proper, or the best, or the most elegant, or the simplest. Your other thread in this forum shows that several times - you should not tell people to use Vector Linux as a Slackware rescue disk when the Slackware boot disk can do all the rescuing you need.

In this case of the wireless support, you wrote a script, and hacked two system files, when all that was needed was editing the configuration files Slackware offers you on a plate. I've just shown you how simple it is. Both ways work equally well, let that much be clear, but your way lacks encryption support and is targeted at your specific machine.

Eric
 
Old 09-05-2007, 01:17 PM   #13
Lufbery
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Distribution: Slackware 64 14.0
Posts: 1,142
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 119Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by geomatt View Post
Eric,
Thanks for the suggestions as well. How would you handle the multiple access points issue (some encrypted, some not) with a minimum amount of reconfiguring things?

-geo
Quote:
Originally Posted by merer
Alien Bob already gave you your answer:
Use wpa_supplicant to configure network settings (both encrypted and unencrypted) and use the third version of rc.inet1.conf (the one with wpa encryption - with the line WLAN_WPA[4]="wpa_supplicant" ).
Hi all,

I'm new to this too, and I'm wondering if I'm missing something fundamental. So here is a very basic question:

Is it possible to log onto open networks like at my local pizza shop or Borders book store without knowing the details of how their wireless access point is configured and/or editing configuration files on my hard drive?

Regards,

-Drew
 
Old 09-05-2007, 01:37 PM   #14
dennisk
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Southwestern USA
Distribution: CentOS
Posts: 279

Rep: Reputation: 30
Two comments

After you have your wifi card working, checkout kwifimanager to manage it for you.

And if you've tried everything to get your BroadCom miniPCI laptop wifi card to work and it still won't, go on eBay and purchase for under $25 an Intel IWP2200 card. The Intel driver comes with Slackware and all you need to do is install (actually just copy to /lib/firmware) the firmware then reboot the laptop or restart the network.

Dennisk
 
Old 09-05-2007, 01:52 PM   #15
geomatt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: PA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 315

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Two comments
RE: #1 -- I'd rather avoid using kwifimanager, since I find KDE apps a bit clunky. But that's an aesthetic judgment, not a functional one. I have been using wifi-radar and the results have been unreliable.

RE: #2 -- The wifi card is in fact an Intel IPW3945 card. I am using the iwl3945 driver and am thinking of switching to the slackbuild version of the ipw3945 driver to see if it makes a difference. I'd rather wait a bit before ripping open my new laptop and sticking a used piece of hardware in it, though I am not averse to that in general.

The problem has been that I find myself having to re-edit too many config files, and restart too many services too often, and I was just looking for a more trimmed down way.

-geo
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
slackware intel wireless configuration jommy Linux - Wireless Networking 1 06-13-2006 03:31 AM
3com Wireless PCI adapter configuration problems on Slackware 10.2 tux31337 Linux - Wireless Networking 2 02-13-2006 11:36 AM
Tuning a Slackware 10 and kernel 2.6.10 mikz Slackware 2 02-11-2005 12:49 PM
Slackware 9 & Wireless configuration hecresper Slackware 4 03-27-2004 11:37 AM
--> :) slackware running, but still need help in tuning, thanks! pumpuli Linux - Newbie 3 01-08-2004 05:50 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:13 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration