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Old 10-05-2006, 12:36 PM   #16
anakin
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Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Tirnaveni, Romania
Distribution: Slackware 12.2 (current)
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I don't think that the "Slackware vs other linux distros" discutions are good...people are different all over the world...what I think it's best, someone else thinks it's crap...the same is with linux distro's...I find Slackware the best fit for me..it's not perfect but it's the best for me...instead of this maybe some slacker would tell me why the hell can't I install subfs file system on my fresh Slackware 11 with 2.6.17.13 kernel..PS: I tried all kernels and I cant install it..and it worked perfectly in my Slack 10.2...
 
Old 10-05-2006, 12:37 PM   #17
folkenfanel
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Location: formerly Fanelia and Zaibach
Distribution: Slackware-current with KDE 4.8.5
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Cool high resistance

I forgot to add that Slackware is (and probably all Linux distros are) very good for all the people watching (legal) XXX stuff. No viruses, that's like going out having intercourse whitout protection being pretty much immune to anything! (except of course running out of memory)

Go XXX!
 
Old 10-05-2006, 12:47 PM   #18
hrp2171
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Registered: Aug 2004
Location: California, USA
Distribution: Ubuntu
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I have been using Slackware since 8.0 and liked it and would not try any other distribution. However, just recently a Debian-based distribution piqued my interest: Ubuntu. So I ordered the CD, played with in LiveCD mode, but didn't quite like it. Kubuntu came along, so I gave it a try. Now Kubuntu is my main distribution on my laptop. I have the "distro scars" to show that I'm experienced with Linux and now it's time for me to actually use and not worry about configuring it at all.

I'll probably go back to Slackware once the 2.6 kernel and KDE4 are made defaults and not extras or test.
 
Old 10-05-2006, 01:23 PM   #19
simcox1
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Here are two examples of what I like about slackware, compared to the only other distro I have used a lot. Mandriva.

1. Once you get it running, it's easier to use. Example of installing software.

Mandriva: Go to Mandriva control centre -> sign in as root -> go to packages -> go to install software -> search for package -> select package -> install package -. go back to control centre -> exit.

Slackware: Download package -> installpkg *.tgz (as root).

You can of course use urpmi from the command line, but I never learnt how to do that as it wasn't necessary.

Which brings me nicely to my second point.

2. Dependency checking. Example - installing hplip for printer. If using Mandriva urpmi, it would automatically download and install all dependencies. For the hp-toolbox gui, QT and some kde packages are required. They are absolutely unnecessary, but as they are listed in the mandriva rpm package they will be added. They are solely for the toolbox which tells you how much ink you've got among other things. If you don't have kde on your system, this would involve a massive download including qt, kdelibs and kdebase. With Slackware you just installpkg hplip.

There are two good reasons why I prefer Slackware to Mandriva (Mandrake).
 
Old 10-05-2006, 01:44 PM   #20
ciotog
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Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harishankar
I've said it before and I'll say it again...

What's with this "learning" thing? Doing routine system maintenance is not learning unless you plan to be a full-time system administrator or a Linux specialist.

Equating learning = installing some drivers + making your sound work + configuring xorg and video + compiling applications is just stupid.

Learning has more to do with doing something actually productive on your computer and not just routine maintenance.

I get tired of this argument after a while.
That's because you don't understand the argument - the argument is that Slackware helps you learn linux. It's not saying it helps you learn algebra, learn how to tie your shoes, or anything else - it helps you learn how Linux operates under the hood.

It's like someone who buys a certain car because it's easy to do routine maintenance on it, whereas someone else buys the same car because they like the seats. The first person could very well say that this car helps one learn how cars work, whereas the second person takes it to a shop for every oil change. The second person could say the first is wasting their time learning something that they don't care about, but it doesn't change the argument that the car is good for learning.

Anyway, if you don't like these types of threads why do you always seem to read them and respond?
 
Old 10-05-2006, 07:57 PM   #21
frodo
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Registered: May 2005
Location: Indiana, U.S.A.
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, CentOS, and RedHat
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The appeal of Slackware

It allows me to run Dropline Gnome.
 
Old 10-05-2006, 09:06 PM   #22
LiNuCe
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Registered: Apr 2004
Location: France
Distribution: Slackware Linux 10.2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbeer
I think this should have been Slackware 10.3 not 11.0.
100% true. I do NOT understand why it is called Slackware 11.0 ...
 
Old 10-05-2006, 09:16 PM   #23
Celeborn
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Registered: Dec 2005
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I'd like to say, I'm glad this is causing at least some discussion, which is what I was hoping for Thank you for all the replies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
I see where you're coming from. The truth is, the Slackware system "just works." I know it sounds incredible, but I can honestly say that dependancies have never been an issue for me in over 7 years of using Slackware.
Could you tell me how you generally install packages on Slackware? I've run into dependency issues almost solely on Slackware, and I'd like to know how to avoid them. My usual process was to first look through linuxpackages.net first, then if I can't find it there, I'd download the source, untar, ./configure , make, and then use checkinstall to make it into a .tgz, then installpkg. I'd do this down the line with dependencies as well. Then, when something doesn't work, even when I think I have all of the dependencies covered, that's where it gets confusing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
That's a fair-sized generalisation you've made there, and (if I may ) in all honesty it's a bit rich coming from a Debian user.
I apologize for that remark, and I knew it was a very big generalization, it was just my bitter experiences creeping up on me and through the keyboard. It wasn't meant as an attack, there are certainly friendly and unfriendly users in any distribution. To judge them solely on one part of the group wouldn't be fair.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
I don't know what you're trying to achieve with statements like these. If you don't like it, go back to a distro that you do like. It ain't rocket science. Slackware isn't for everybody. If it was there wouldn't be any other distros.
I didn't have a goal with statements like those other than explaining my current mindset. It's certainly not fact, and should be taken with a grain of salt. Just explaining myself and why I'm confused(as part of leading up to my questioning )

Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
I've tried, but you don't seem the 'persuadeable' type.
On the contrary, I'm quite light-hearted, and this post was (supposed) to be made in that manner, though I'm sorry it came off quite differently to you. I very much appreciate your response


Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
I don't know. Originally I switched to Slackware from RedHat-6.0, which still holds the record as the most frustrating OS I've ever used. Upon installing Slackware, I was gobsmacked and awestruck that Linux could be so good. It instantly struck a chord with me. I gave up trying other distros, because I'd use them for a week and always end up deleting them. Slackware is my home. It doesn't second-guess me. It stays out of my way. It makes my computer do as it's told when I tell it. Unlike many other distros (and Windows even) I've never found myself staring at the HDD led wondering what it's doing, because I know what it's doing all the time.
This is a good example, because I too wonder sometimes when my computer is making noise, and I'm not doing anything, what it's doing on it's own


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilgar
So it's only natural that you see pro-Slackware responses here. This has nothing to do with being a fanboy etc. Nobody told Celeborn that he must use Slackware. Like everyone, he has a taste of his own and can of course go with his choice of distribution. Upon his request, we're explaining why Slackware is our choice, that's all.
Thank you! My goal wasn't to say "X distro is better than Slack", instead, I tried to explain my thoughts about it, and then asked what the "Appeal" of Slackware was, to you. I realized it was a request, and I tried to present it as such, after posting my current thoughts and feelings, to give a general sense of how I felt about it. I ask that if any one doesn't like my question, to please just not respond in a negative manner. It's only opinion, and I was of course expecting more pro-Slackware responses than "my frustrations with Slackware" type responses in the Slackware user forum I do, however, like to read both about what people like, and dislike, about something Also, thank you for the links, I'll be looking through them

b0uncer, I apologize for making a topic you don't like - and the reason I'm asking from others is that I'm interested in reading about people's views, experiences, and thoughts about Slackware. I have used Slackware before, and I have formed opinions about it, but I want to know what the appeal is to other people who use Slackware daily(which I don't do) and are experienced and knowledgeable about it.

To everyone else, I appreciate your sharing. I hope this topic remains a civil discussion
 
Old 10-05-2006, 09:40 PM   #24
LiNuCe
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Registered: Apr 2004
Location: France
Distribution: Slackware Linux 10.2
Posts: 119

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeborn
I can't find an appealing aspect of Slackware. It has a large userbase, and people seem to love it, yet I can't figure out why. This makes me think it's something I'm missing, something dealing with me, not Slackware.
If you can not figure out why Slackware is good for you, that's simply because it does not fit your needs. So you can use another Linux distribution without worrying about Slackware.

Quote:
To me, dependency checking is one of the key points of package management.
If you think so, that's simply because Slackware does not fit your need of a package management with dependency checking. So you can use another Linux distribution without worrying about Slackware.

Quote:
The only thing Slackware might be able to say, is that it forces users to do things the "hard way" and learn a method they might not be familiar with. I don't feel this is valid though.
If you think so, that's simply because Slackware does not fit your needs by requiring you to do things the hard way where other Linux distributions do all the hard work for you. So you can use another Linux distribution without worrying about Slackware.

Quote:
Again, I'm going to say, I don't hate Slackware. I'm just confused by it. I know there's something good about it, something maybe I'm missing, but to me it just seems like the most basic, unnecessary form of an operating system ever conceived.
You get a point ! Slackware is a base Linux distribution which each user customises accordingly to his/her needs. So you did not miss anything about Slackware : it simply does not fit your needs to get a ready-to-use Linux system without much configuration. So you can use another Linux distribution without worrying about Slackware.

Quote:
I've read other topics similar to what I've just posted about, and none of them seem to have any valid points whatsoever.
The only valid points about Slackware are those that each user gives it accordingly to her/his needs. Everything else is nonsense. And that's true for every software in the world. So, for example, you can spend hours explaining why Debian is better than Slackware, for me it will be "why Debian is better than Slackware for you", because your needs are not mine.

Quote:
I would really like to believe Slackware is a great distribution that I could use daily over all of the other distributions out there.
Slackware is not a great distribution : it simply fits my needs.

Quote:
Tell me what you appreciate about Slackware, why you choose to use it over other distributions
It simply fits my needs because it is so reasonably bare and simple that I can customise it the way I want it to fit my needs.

Quote:
(...) and the frustrations you face with it.
GNOME removal is my main frustration about Slackware.

Quote:
Tell me anything about Slackware you think I should hear.
Slackware is definitely not for you ;o) However, your message was an interesting one (at least for me).

Last edited by LiNuCe; 10-05-2006 at 09:42 PM.
 
Old 10-05-2006, 09:52 PM   #25
Celeborn
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Registered: Dec 2005
Posts: 9

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiNuCe
...YOUR...
Touché good sir

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiNuCe
It simply fits my needs because it is so reasonably bare and simple that I can customise it the way I want it to fit my needs.
That is good, and I actually like my systems more bare to let me set them up how I like them. It would seem Slackware would actually be a good system for me - but as I explained, I felt Slackware actually came with quite a bit, and wasn't sure how to slim it down. I suppose this could be remedied by using "pkgtool" and manually removing unneeded packages after the install? Perhaps a prompted package-by-package install as well. Hmm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiNuCe
...your message was an interesting one (at least for me).
I'm glad you found it so
 
Old 10-05-2006, 10:03 PM   #26
Z038
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Registered: Jan 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 804

Rep: Reputation: 157Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilgar
Here's my collection of topics from this forum (I'm using it for propaganda purposes elsewhere ). You'll find hundreds of comments on why people like Slack so much:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=423693
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=288054
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=400397
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=382941
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=419546
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=420829
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=388016
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=398078
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=394396
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=116051
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=345616
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=386562
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=420829
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=443288
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=446177
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=439498
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=456022
You forgot this one

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=453528

Celeborn, see my two posts in the above thread, especially my Ford pickup truck analogy.

Last edited by Z038; 10-05-2006 at 10:06 PM.
 
Old 10-05-2006, 10:17 PM   #27
Franklin
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Registered: Oct 2002
Distribution: Slackware, WinXP, Windows 7
Posts: 1,253

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Well put LiNuCe.

I can't really figure out why Slackware users are so often asked to defend their choice of distro. Then when you try to explain why, they tell you you're wrong. Then when you get irritated they say you are full of yourself.

Please, anyone else who wants to ask this question again, just go try Slackware yourself. If you like it, great. If you hate it, that's fine too. What ever you decide, just keep it to yourself.

Please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiNuCe
GNOME removal is my main frustration about Slackware.
Are you planning on creating a minimal Gnome install like you did with Slackware 10.1? It was one of my favorite Gnome options at the time.
 
Old 10-05-2006, 10:22 PM   #28
regis_n_bits
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In response to the OP:
Quote:
I want to start this post by saying: I don't hate Slackware, and this is not intended to be an attack on it. This is just my personal experience and wonder in action.(Note: this will probably be interpreted as "I hate Slackware, and this is my attack on it." )

I can't find an appealing aspect of Slackware. It has a large userbase, and people seem to love it, yet I can't figure out why. This makes me think it's something I'm missing, something dealing with me, not Slackware. It also seems like a lot of things I hear about being the "pros" of Slackware are contradictory to the actual system, but again, I'm thinking it's probably just me, and I'm asking for someone to shed some light onto my confused perspective.
You don't hate Slackware, but you can't find anything appealing about it? If you can't even think of just one aspect about Slackware that you like, then you obviously don't like it. Just say that. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions (even wrong ones).
Quote:
1.First and foremost, I hear about Slackware being a "quick, basic" install, giving you only what you need, and letting you build your system from there. This is what I generally like to do with a Debian Net Install, so that was immediately appealing to me. When I boot the install cd, however, an install is "3+GB", and recommended. I imagine there's a way to slim down the install incredibly, but I'm really unsure about what's necessary and what's not, and there's one other thing that makes me think a small install with Slackware would be a horrid thing(read next point).
Slackware's approach to installation is very straight forward and open to the user (this is one of the good points about Slackware). You can either install all packages, or use the menu installation to pick the ones you want. Required packages get installed automatically. Check out the 'tagfile' in each install subdirectory to see which packages are required or optional.
Quote:
2.I have heard Slackware is "free from dependency hell" many times, yet in the handbook alone even it says that Slackware's package management tool doesn't check dependencies.
Well no OS is ever free from dependency checking. But Slackware has chosen a simple and sensible approach. A package will either already include all of the required files needed, or else the package documentation should identify its dependencies. The Sysadmin has full control over what is installed, with no hidden package installs in the background.
Quote:
3.On the topic of attitude. People on these forums are generally very nice, but sometimes you wish for a more active, immdiately communicative environment, and that for me usually results in irc. I don't know why, but generally #slackware on freenode.net, to me, is full of the most cocky and non-informing type. Usually I wonder why some of them are in there. To type "RTFM" many times, while not even reading the fact that you've already read the manuals and are still confused about something?
Rude people on IRC? Well I have never heard of such a thing.
Quote:
4."If you learn Slackware, you learn Linux." This statement makes no sense to me whatsoever. Slackware is different from every distribution I have used, just like every distribution is different from every other distribution. "Installpkg" to a .tgz file won't work in anything else, "xwmconfig" won't set up my window manager in any other distro. The only thing Slackware might be able to say, is that it forces users to do things the "hard way" and learn a method they might not be familiar with. I don't feel this is valid though.
Yeah, this quote is a little bit presumptuous. I think a better quote would be "Slackware lets you learn the basics of a Linux system from the start." The FAQs and man pages provide lots of helpful information to the user about configuring Slackware. And the configuration files are filled with lots of helpful comments and examples for any user. This lets users learn the basics of Slackware as they are using it.
And knowledge that someone gains from configuring and administering a Slackware system should help them understand any Linux distribution a little better. Is there any better way to learn about any OS than from the basics?
 
Old 10-05-2006, 10:23 PM   #29
LiNuCe
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Registered: Apr 2004
Location: France
Distribution: Slackware Linux 10.2
Posts: 119

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeborn
It would seem Slackware would actually be a good system for me - but as I explained, I felt Slackware actually came with quite a bit, and wasn't sure how to slim it down. I suppose this could be remedied by using "pkgtool" and manually removing unneeded packages after the install? Perhaps a prompted package-by-package install as well. Hmm.
If you really want a very minimal Slackware system which can at least boot, you should install only required packages of the A serie in expert mode. You can also read this section of the Getting a Slackware root filesystem documentation : it lists the packages you need to get a very minimal Slackware system which can boot. It is so minimal that the only work you can do with it is editing text file with elvis
 
Old 10-05-2006, 10:24 PM   #30
Celeborn
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Registered: Dec 2005
Posts: 9

Original Poster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franklin
Well put LiNuCe.

I can't really figure out why Slackware users are so often asked to defend their choice of distro. Then when you try to explain why, they tell you you're wrong. Then when you get irritated they say you are full of yourself.

Please, anyone else who wants to ask this question again, just go try Slackware yourself. If you like it, great. If you hate it, that's fine too. What ever you decide, just keep it to yourself.

Please.

I apologize, I'm not asking for anyone to defend their choice of Slackware. I'm simply asking more experienced Slackware users to share with me(and others) their Slackware experiences - what makes it appealing to them, what difficulties they've found with it, how they compare it to other distributions, and what they'd like to be different about it. It's all simply a matter of opinion, and a request made by me, so do not feel obliged to reply, or read it, if you don't want to. As I said, I just appreciate the replies because I think it makes for interesting discussion


Quote:
Originally Posted by Z038
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=453528

Celeborn, see my two posts in the above thread, especially my Ford pickup truck analogy.
Both of your posts in that thread were very insightful, thank you


Quote:
Originally Posted by regis_n_bits
Slackware's approach to installation is very straight forward and open to the user (this is one of the good points about Slackware). You can either install all packages, or use the menu installation to pick the ones you want. Required packages get installed automatically. Check out the 'tagfile' in each install subdirectory to see which packages are required or optional.
I will most certainly go back through the install. I recognized, while doing the full install, the "Optional" and "Required" tags at the bottom of the screen, but I didn't know there was a way to view them all before hand to check which are required and not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by regis_n_bits
Rude people on IRC? Well I have never heard of such a thing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by regis_n_bits
Is there any better way to learn about any OS than from the basics?
That's a very good point. To learn anything in the world, it's always a good method to start with the basics, and then work your way up from there. I suppose the part I was struggling with was the thought of: "Why, after learning the basics, would people stay with such a method, when newer ones are available?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiNuCe
If you really want a very minimal Slackware system which can at least boot, you should install only required packages of the A serie in expert mode. You can also read this section of the Getting a Slackware root filesystem documentation : it lists the packages you need to get a very minimal Slackware system which can boot. It is so minimal that the only work you can do with it is editing text file with elvis
Well, maybe not that minimal

Last edited by Celeborn; 10-05-2006 at 10:48 PM.
 
  


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