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Old 09-02-2007, 08:43 PM   #1
slackass
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tar.gz to .tgz ??


Would some one please walk me through converting a .tar.gz to .tgz ?
I'm trying to install guarddog on Slack 12 using installpkg.
I'm a Slack newbi and have a very low skill level with Slack.

Thanks.

Last edited by slackass; 09-02-2007 at 08:46 PM.
 
Old 09-02-2007, 09:00 PM   #2
acummings
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.tar.gz likely (often) is source code

In the case of Slackware (to make a pkg for Slackware), in a nutshell, that source gets compiled and installed into a folder tree and Slackware's 'makepkg' utility is used in the process.

A Slackware build script is like a wrapper that "does it all in one" so to speak.

http://slackbuilds.org/repository/12...work/guarddog/

howto on same web site tells how using source code to build a Slackware package.

Or you could look for a Slackware package of guarddog.

I build lots of my own. It's not too hard. Plenty of support out there.

--
Alan.
 
Old 09-02-2007, 09:19 PM   #3
dxqcanada
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Code:
# mv xxx.tar.gz xxx.tgz
The file extension means nothing special to Linux (unlike Windows).

If a file is a gzipped tar ball then the common file extension can be either of the two. The extensions used in Linux are just to help a user figure out what the file may be ... file extensions are not required in Linux ... it is just considered part of the file name.
 
Old 09-02-2007, 09:35 PM   #4
slackass
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Thank Alan, I'll take a shot at it.
I've got Slack on my extra box to play with trying to learn new tricks.
I've done the hose/re-install thing several times already and learn a little bit more each time.
 
Old 09-03-2007, 04:47 AM   #5
Tux-Slack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxqcanada View Post
Code:
# mv xxx.tar.gz xxx.tgz
The file extension means nothing special to Linux (unlike Windows).

If a file is a gzipped tar ball then the common file extension can be either of the two. The extensions used in Linux are just to help a user figure out what the file may be ... file extensions are not required in Linux ... it is just considered part of the file name.
Yes, and then he'll install source code instead of the binaries with installpkg...

Making a slackware package just for you is useless, unless you intend to share it with the rest of us. You could just normally compile the sources and then use checkinstall to install the application or whatever is that you are installing.
Checkinstall will as well put the software in the pkgtool package list.
 
Old 09-03-2007, 06:17 AM   #6
Alien Bob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tux-Slack View Post
Making a slackware package just for you is useless, unless you intend to share it with the rest of us.
Well, I don't agree on that. Creating packages for your own use will teach you how to build proper software, and how to properly build software. Plus, you can consider a well-commented SlackBuild script a way of documenting what you did to create your binaries.

Quote:
You could just normally compile the sources and then use checkinstall to install the application or whatever is that you are installing.
Checkinstall will as well put the software in the pkgtool package list.
It's just that checkinstall is not part of Slackware 12.0 so that makes it a little more difficult. And checkinstall does not create 100% correct package in all cases, although it does a good job. Never blindly trust a checkinstall-ed package. Always look at the package contents before installing it (look at file/directory attributes, ownership, missing docs, stuff like that).

Eric
 
Old 09-03-2007, 06:22 AM   #7
Tux-Slack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
Well, I don't agree on that. Creating packages for your own use will teach you how to build proper software, and how to properly build software. Plus, you can consider a well-commented SlackBuild script a way of documenting what you did to create your binaries.
Well for a low-end user this isn't that much important.

With the second part I agree 100%.
 
Old 09-03-2007, 06:28 AM   #8
gnashley
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Try using and (recommending) src2pkg instead of checkinstall. It will figure out if the package is an installable binary tarball or a source tarball and do the appropriate thing in either case. Do follow the advice of checking the resulting package for usability, but src2pkg is much less likely to leave 'orphaned' files on your system than checkinstall or from just running 'make install'. Most packages will not need any extra options in order to compile and install correctly.
If you use the scripting abilities of src2pkg you will always have a way to reproduce the package as well as having any unusual options concisely documented.
 
Old 09-03-2007, 08:51 PM   #9
acummings
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As reported, depends on what's inside the .tar.gz

If you use KDE, in the Konqueror file browser you can right click the .tar.gz then choose "preview in archiver"

which lets you see inside. I'm sure there also are other ways to see the inside contents of the .tar.gz

Whenever a SlackBuild script is available, I tend to use this/same.

src2pkg works excellently. I've used it upwards of ten to fifteen times or more. More than that because I used older versions of it before version 1.5 came out.

Code:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/showthread.php?t=560844
The first post of that thread discloses where src2pkg is available at.

--
Alan.
 
Old 09-03-2007, 09:35 PM   #10
hitest
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I use src2pkg and like it a lot:

You can download src2pkg here: http://distro.ibiblio.org/pub/linux/...nload/src2pkg/
 
Old 09-04-2007, 12:22 AM   #11
slackass
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SOLVED!!
Thanks so much everybody!
The src2pkg worked perfect and now I have a Guarddog firewall.
I began reading the Slack book today so hopefully I'll be able to expand my knowledge and not get hung up of stuff like this.

I was able to fumble through Suse and Debian but Slack has me reading the book.

Thanks to all, I've learned a lot today.
 
  


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