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-   -   System unusable after trying to add multilib to Slackware64 (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/system-unusable-after-trying-to-add-multilib-to-slackware64-4175479510/)

jhdalben 10-03-2013 03:31 PM

System unusable after trying to add multilib to Slackware64
 
Hey, I just reinstalled Slackware64 14.0 and wanted to turn it multilib, but things didn't go well and it seems to have messed up my path or binaries on it. Here's what I did:

Code:

lftp -c 'open http://slackware.com/~alien/multilib/ ; mirror 14.0'
It downloaded a folder called '14.0', I cd'ed into it, then ran (as root)

Code:

upgradepkg --reinstall --install-new *.t?z
But after that, my system became unusable, and any command I type returns, for example:

Code:

bash-4.2$ ls
bash: /bin/ls: No such file or directory

What did I do wrong, and how to recover from this state?

Thanks in advance.

cmiles 10-03-2013 03:37 PM

You did not complete all of it
Follow these instructions http://connie.slackware.com/~alien/multilib/

Craig

jhdalben 10-03-2013 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmiles (Post 5039561)
You did not complete all of it
Follow these instructions http://connie.slackware.com/~alien/multilib/

Craig

The next step would be:

Code:

* You are now going to install 32-bit compatibility packages to support all
  the 32-bit programs you may want to run (roughly 60 MB of packages, not all
  that much really!).  To do so, change to the subdirectory called
  "slackware64-compat32" which you also downloaded with the "lftp" command
  shown above.  Run this command:
  "upgradepkg --install-new *-compat32/*.t?z"

But my system can't even find upgradepkg anymore so that I can procceed into this step...

Alien Bob 10-03-2013 04:42 PM

When you re-installed, did you install Slackware 64-bit or perhaps the 32-bit Slackware?
You can boot from the Slackware install CD/DVD/USB and use that as a rescue system. Check the names of packages that were installed (use the system's /var/log/packages directory to determine what has been installed).

Eric

kikinovak 10-03-2013 05:02 PM

I vaguely remember something similar had happened when I tried to install multilib on 32-bit Slackware. Had used the wrong side of the double-sided DVD (32-bit instead of 64-bit), and the whole operation ended in shallows and in miseries.

jhdalben 10-03-2013 09:55 PM

Oops, in fact I used the wrong DVD and installed the 32 bit version! Sorry and thanks guys.

Btw Eric, I'm a big fan of yours. How did you become such a Slackware enthusiast? Do you have any advices for an amateur like me? :p

Skaperen 10-04-2013 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhdalben (Post 5039729)
Oops, in fact I used the wrong DVD and installed the 32 bit version! Sorry and thanks guys.

Btw Eric, I'm a big fan of yours. How did you become such a Slackware enthusiast? Do you have any advices for an amateur like me? :p

Just keep at it. Do more. You learn. We've all made mistakes and we learn from them. Eventually we find ways to contribute.

Alien Bob 10-04-2013 05:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhdalben (Post 5039729)
Btw Eric, I'm a big fan of yours. How did you become such a Slackware enthusiast? Do you have any advices for an amateur like me? :p

I started using Slackware in a professional environment; our developers used Slackware as programming and cross-compiling environment because we could not afford an expensive SUN workstation - the customer's target platform - for everyone. I then used Slackware as the basis for setting up an Intranet for our company (that was in 1995-1996 I think).
I started using Slackware for myself really after we were acquired by IBM and everyone received a ThinkPad laptop. I installed Slackware on it, kept getting annoyed at the lack of TokenRing (IBM did not have Ethernet at the time) support in Slackware's network configuration, kept bugging Pat V. about accepting my patches to rc.inet1 and when he did, I got so excited that all sorts of balls started rolling and never stopped.

Bottomline is, that you need to define some goals for using Slackware, and work on achieving those. You will learn things that way which you will never learn if you just use Slackware like you would Windows (i.e. as a common enduser).

Eric

willysr 10-04-2013 05:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 5039909)
Bottomline is, that you need to define some goals for using Slackware, and work on achieving those. You will learn things that way which you will never learn if you just use Slackware like you would Windows (i.e. as a common enduser).
Eric

I like this quote. Might want to add it as my signature as well :)
I do shared almost the same experience as Eric and ended in Slackware since 2005 and since then, i keep using Slackware as my main OS on all of my machines


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