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Old 01-01-2004, 05:13 PM   #1
[GOD]Anck
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symlinking /opt to /usr/?


Hey, hopefully this will be my last question before I feel confident enough to reformat.

I want to go and reinstall Slackware 9.1 from the CD's. I want to keep a relatively small (256 MB) / partition, moving /boot, /home, /root, /usr, /usr/local, /var and /tmp out of the way into seperate partitions. But I'm kind of stuck on /opt. The Slack installer puts KDE and some other stuff in there. I feel KDE, and the rest of the stuff in /opt, should really be somewhere under /usr instead, /usr/opt for example.

So my question is: Is it possible to create a symlink /opt -> /usr/opt before the Slack installer actually starts installing any packages there? Or, if this is a bad idea, what could I do instead to get the stuff from /opt on the /usr partition?
 
Old 01-01-2004, 06:38 PM   #2
trickykid
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I don't think its possible to create the symlink but you could just move it after the install and create the link to the new location.
 
Old 01-01-2004, 06:45 PM   #3
poison
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this maybe not the exact answer you expected....but...
why would you like to create those extra partitions ?
the only ones that make sense are an extra partition for /etc and /home for easier recovering in a case that is _very_ unlikely to happen.
the less partitions you have the more flexible you are when it comes to installing new software and running out of space on one of your partitions...
and...
IMHO: kde belongs into /opt ...
...like every software that has a non-linux-standard confirm file layout...
 
Old 01-01-2004, 06:51 PM   #4
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by poison
this maybe not the exact answer you expected....but...
why would you like to create those extra partitions ?
the only ones that make sense are an extra partition for /etc and /home for easier recovering in a case that is _very_ unlikely to happen.
the less partitions you have the more flexible you are when it comes to installing new software and running out of space on one of your partitions...
and...
IMHO: kde belongs into /opt ...
...like every software that has a non-linux-standard confirm file layout...
Creating separate partitions is actually better.

Imagine something happens and your log files fill up your drive.. and you have them on the same partition as /. Oh no, now you can't boot your system cause there is no space left. Same goes for /tmp, etc. Also if you ever setup quotas for users, etc, it makes it much more effective and more control over your filesystem assigning quota's for different users and groups as well.

I always create separate partitions for the following directories:

/boot
/
/usr
/var
/tmp
/home

It is more effecient to have separate partitions than one big one, especially in a server environment. But you should always create the sizes you need precisely thinking about future expansion, etc.
 
Old 01-01-2004, 07:12 PM   #5
poison
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sorry trickykid...
I don't wanna start a pop war ^^
but assuming you wanna install program x and don't have enough space on one of your partitions, lets say /usr ...but enough space for that program in /etc....
what are you going to do. reformat your system ?
if your logs fill up your harddisk it's the same whether you got them on a extra partition or not, you can still boot from CD and delete them.
the only case I could think of extra partitions are usefull is ... reinstalling the OS...
and you only get extra performance if those partitions are on seperate physical media...
I'm only talking about what my experince is...
please give me a comment ^^
 
Old 01-01-2004, 07:22 PM   #6
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by poison
sorry trickykid...
I don't wanna start a pop war ^^
but assuming you wanna install program x and don't have enough space on one of your partitions, lets say /usr ...but enough space for that program in /etc....
what are you going to do. reformat your system ?
if your logs fill up your harddisk it's the same whether you got them on a extra partition or not, you can still boot from CD and delete them.
the only case I could think of extra partitions are usefull is ... reinstalling the OS...
and you only get extra performance if those partitions are on seperate physical media...
I'm only talking about what my experince is...
please give me a comment ^^
That's why I mentioned also to create your partitions for future expansion and such. I've never created a separate parititon for /etc, just doesn't take up that much space to tell you the truth.

Like explained above, if you have a separate /var/ partition where your logs are stored, if something crazy happens for your logs to just keep writing to fill up your drive, they will not exceed the amount of space assigned to the partition they are mounted on, thus enabling you or not requiring you to have to use a boot disk, etc to get your system up and running.

Also like mentioned above, gives you more control over setting up quota's as well.

I run my server with what I stated above. Without X installed, my / partition is only taking up 55 megs along with having about 900 megs left over with free space. I plan my partitions carefully. I create a 10Gb partition for /usr in which only about 800 megs is taken up currently. Plenty of space to work with down the road.

And regarding performance, there is no harm in separating to have separate paritions for your directories to mount to, so why not divide them up for all the extra benefits, instead of having them all on one big partition?

Also, I boink my system and only want to reinstall /usr with its packages, well, makes it alot easier to do if its on its own partition, instead of trying to install it with every other directory alongside with it, etc.

Trust me, the advantages of having seperate partitions to me outweigh just having one big one.

That's my two cents.

Last edited by trickykid; 01-01-2004 at 07:24 PM.
 
Old 01-01-2004, 11:03 PM   #7
reggie
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It will be fine, just make sure you have enough space (you should do that when you install your OS).

# cd /; mv opt /usr; ln -s usr/opt opt;

That will mv your /opt into /usr and create a symbolic link to usr/opt in /opt, or something. I did that and working good with no problems.

Make sure those files aren't in use, like KDE libs.

Hmm.. here is the output of my mount:

/dev/hdb3 on / type ext3 (rw)
/dev/hdb1 on /boot type ext3 (rw)
/dev/hdb10 on /bom type ext3 (rw)
/dev/hdb2 on /root type ext3 (rw)
/dev/hdb5 on /var type ext3 (rw)
/dev/hdb6 on /tmp type ext3 (rw)
/dev/hdb7 on /usr type reiserfs (rw)
/dev/hdb8 on /home type reiserfs (rw)
/dev/hda1 on /mnt/win_c type vfat (rw,dmask=750)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620)
proc on /proc type proc (rw)
 
  


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